Thread: Engine preview inside

Engine preview inside

  1. #1

    Engine preview inside

    I think there's been enough guesswork. Here is what I know the engine will be capable of. This is Tomb Raider: Legend which was released in 06. I suggest you pick it up as it will show you what you will see in Deus Ex 3 and Thief 4.

    Most exciting is the water and scalability of the engine itself. You can expect huge levels like in Deus Ex and Thief 1. Plus the next gen effects are incredible.

    You see the water run off of Lara's skin for example. Also the engine is capable of rendering in real time very realistic looking characters. The textures are good but really seeing the game in motion with all the bells and whistles should be experienced for yourself.









    Post your comments below. By the time Deus Ex 3 and Thief 4 hit retail stores the engine will be sublime. By the way these are jpegs. The game looks twice as good in real time.

  2. #2
    Deus Ex isn't using this Engine. I'd assume it was using the New Tomb Raider engine.

  3. #3
    It is using this engine because the new tomb raider engine is basically this engine but they keep adding things to it. (They being Crystal Dynamics)

    The effects I see in Tomb Raider: Legend I will most likely see in Deus Ex 3. (Like water running off a characters skin/wardrobe)

    http://www.joystiq.com/2007/12/03/to...wer-deus-ex-3/

    If you are talking about the engine for Tomb Raider: Underworld it's basically this engine but as stated above they add better things to it.

    You can call it new but I just call it the Tomb Raider engine and/or the Crystal Dynamics engine hehe .

  4. #4
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    Originally Posted by Unstoppable
    You see the water run off of Lara's skin for example.
    Everyone seems to think that was a great feature. It was stupid and useless.

  5. #5
    are you female, as I can't see many males agreeing with that sentiment

  6. #6
    Originally Posted by GlobalNode
    Everyone seems to think that was a great feature. It was stupid and useless.
    Actually, I liked that feature, when I saw a demo at a GameSpot outlet. While I am not sure how Tomb Raider gave any particular use to that feature, I definitely see some potential for it in a DX game. I think it will be cool if I can see the water running off an NPC's skin/wardrobe (I don't expect to be able to see too much of the effect on me, since I expect a first person game), thus giving me the tell-tale sign that the NPC had just come out of the water, and thus could have knowledge of what was in the water. Also, this NPC could have hidden something in the water, him/her-self. Also, if I see an enemy in a scuba suit, all dripping, then I will know that some trap might have been planted for me, under water, like an underwater mine. Alternatively, if I see an enemy in scuba gear (that is, dressed like the divers in OceanLabs, in DX1), but dry, it could mean that there would be a change of guard, soon, and that I had better get ready to get cold and soggy.

  7. #7
    I can understand you think it's useless but that won't be the case if they do Thief 4 with consequences. Like if you jump in the water and come out you might leave a trail of water and a guard might pass by and catch you.

    I like the ideas you have stated and I can't wait to see Deus Ex 3 in action.

  8. #8
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    Im just very glad that this engine can (apparantly) support massive maps. This will be the best part about it. Deus Ex 2 had tiny little hamster cages for maps and it felt as though you never had anywhere to go. So It will be great to see a return to the bigger, more explorable maps with multiple paths and goal points.

    As for the bells and whistles, such as dripping water, I see it being much more beneficial for Thief 4 (If they make it) in terms of how this water affects the stealth elements. I'm glad they are not going for the Unreal engine 3.0 because now they have an in-house engine with easily accessible support so we can expect it be run optimally and work well.

    The game just needs to be clean, simple and efficient in the way it feels and presents itself. And should, as stated repeatedly before, draw its inspiration from DX 1 and not DX2.

  9. #9
    Originally Posted by DXeXodus
    Im just very glad that this engine can (apparantly) support massive maps.
    There will be many more scripts on DX3 though.

    By the way there was an engine thread already.

  10. #10
    Water flowing off a character effect? Add the invisibility effect and theres some interesting potential there, if you've seen that remake of the invisible man (But insane) a few years back, theres a demonstration of its use in there.

    As for the game engine in that old game and as it is now? I'd suggest you take a look at the new lara renders in the TR sub forum, whilst its not a definite indication (Since the renders may not exactly be in-game/engine) of how good the game is going to look it definitely demonstrates the potential for more genuine characters.

    Been replaying DX-IW recently and one thing I kept noticing was the character models & animations, there was a horrible predisposition to an arms folded left-right torso twist during conversation sequences and the way the arms hung from the shoulders didn't feel or look quite right either.

  11. #11
    I only hope my computer can handle it. haha

  12. #12
    This game engine can be exploited by the DX gameplay
    some stuff are present in bioshock like the water effects on you ...

  13. #13
    Originally Posted by Aminevo
    I only hope my computer can handle it. haha
    Well the good news is that the engine is very scalable for a wide range of systems. (Tomb Raider) So odds are it will be able to run on Direct X 9 video cards and single core processors.

    That was a huge problem with Invisible War but that won't be a problem with Deus Ex 3 I am pretty sure.

  14. #14
    That was arguably the mistake made by the developers working on Crysis and even UT3, at least in the case of PC Gamers, assuming that people would have high powered rigs, certainly much more so than reality suggests yet the graphics engine built by Valve (Source) was partly built with scalability in mind. In anycase, I doubt Eidos Montreal will make the mistake of over-estimating the average PC Gamers rig for this, if only to maximise revenues to pay for the games development and such.

  15. #15
    Let's just hope DX3's UI look's nothing like that...

  16. #16
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    I dreamt about DX3 last night... It was awesome, and it had a DX1 health system, but it was slightly improved: when you got hit in your torso, it showed at the torso part that you were hit there, I think with some kind of red symbol. It worked perfectly.
    1,5 year to go...

  17. #17
    Originally Posted by SomaMech
    Let's just hope DX3's UI look's nothing like that...
    Why the hell would it?

  18. #18
    the graphics engine built by Valve (Source) was partly built with scalability in mind.
    Yeah, right now I´m (finally) playing HL2: Ep1 on 5 year old hardware. It runs fine, and I still think the game looks great.

  19. #19

    Post Query

    Does anyone know if Digital Molecular Mass is do-able on this engine? If it is, it HAS to be implemented, it being the cutting edge of gaming tech.

  20. #20
    Originally Posted by Voltaire
    Does anyone know if Digital Molecular Mass is do-able on this engine? If it is, it HAS to be implemented, it being the cutting edge of gaming tech.
    If the first few videos of TFU are accurate, then it might be cool. Looking at some newer footage and you can see they clearly lowered the bar and simplified it. I doubt it's cutting edge, and as it was with Crysis, I'm sure it'll be almost completely done away with in the final game. LA's in-house studio has never been one for gameplay innovation these past years. Other than DMM, Force Unleashed has simple Havok physics middleware.

    But don't you think you should wait till either TFU or Indiana Jones are released and you've played them to form an opinion? It's a little early to say DMM is the cutting edge of "gaming tech".

  21. #21

    Post

    Originally Posted by minus0ne
    If the first few videos of TFU are accurate, then it might be cool. Looking at some newer footage and you can see they clearly lowered the bar and simplified it. I doubt it's cutting edge, and as it was with Crysis, I'm sure it'll be almost completely done away with in the final game. LA's in-house studio has never been one for gameplay innovation these past years. Other than DMM, Force Unleashed has simple Havok physics middleware.

    But don't you think you should wait till either TFU or Indiana Jones are released and you've played them to form an opinion? It's a little early to say DMM is the cutting edge of "gaming tech".
    OK, maybe a little rash in my upfront terminology, but I think it's just about the coolest thing I've seen demonstrated on a video game in recent years. And if physical interaction and reaction is the name of the game then DMM would fit in with what Deus Ex is.

    Another cool tech demo for Alone In The Dark 5 (Infogrames) shows how this kind of developoment can transform a game:
    http://youtube.com/watch?v=PEjIHYKFpNg

  22. #22
    Originally Posted by minus0ne
    Why the hell would it?
    Because DX3 is being developed for next-gen consoles. And console game UI's tend to look like a disability setting on Windows.

  23. #23
    Originally Posted by Voltaire
    OK, maybe a little rash in my upfront terminology, but I think it's just about the coolest thing I've seen demonstrated on a video game in recent years. And if physical interaction and reaction is the name of the game then DMM would fit in with what Deus Ex is.

    Another cool tech demo for Alone In The Dark 5 (Infogrames) shows how this kind of developoment can transform a game:
    http://youtube.com/watch?v=PEjIHYKFpNg
    Well they are promising the moon as did Invisible War, let see if they deliver.

  24. #24
    Originally Posted by SomaMech
    Because DX3 is being developed for next-gen consoles. And console game UI's tend to look like a disability setting on Windows.
    I'd still like to think that's it's being developed first and foremost for PC. Also, it's typically not that hard to redesign a UI for the purpose of a console or PC. BioWare is redesigning the Mass Effect UI (and many other aspects) to make it work even better for PC than it did for consoles. Then again, they have a history of releasing stable betas on consoles first, then finish and polish the game for the PC (and I love BioWare for that). I seriously doubt Eidos Montreal would just knowingly implement one of the biggest flaws of IW in DX3, so that's not particularly one of my greatest worries.

    Originally Posted by Voltaire
    OK, maybe a little rash in my upfront terminology, but I think it's just about the coolest thing I've seen demonstrated on a video game in recent years. And if physical interaction and reaction is the name of the game then DMM would fit in with what Deus Ex is.

    Another cool tech demo for Alone In The Dark 5 (Infogrames) shows how this kind of developoment can transform a game:
    http://youtube.com/watch?v=PEjIHYKFpNg
    It definately looks cool in a video of a tech demo, but I'll judge it when I play it I've become very sceptical of these kinds of middleware. No one can argue with enhanced interaction with the environment, I've just not been convinced that DMM is just that and whether or not this is a 'gimmick' that suits DX3 (or even then, if DMM is the implementation they should go for, or create their own view of interaction), I'll see when I get my hands on it.