Thread: Deus Ex 3: Putting Things Perfectly

Deus Ex 3: Putting Things Perfectly

  1. #1
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    Deus Ex 3: Putting Things Perfectly

    Somebody commented on my Flashing Image Analysis. He sums it up flawlessly.


    Trynka (21 hours ago)

    Deus Ex has the same problem as a bad movie series. The first was an idea that generated a game. The second was a demand for a game which tried to generate an idea. That direction tends to create bad results. According to wiki, deus ex 3 is being created the same way deus ex 2 was. In other words, the company demands a game, and now hope someone comes up with an idea. The product is more likely to be of poor quality like DX2, than the amazing breakthrough of DX1. I won't hold my breath.

  2. #2
    This is pure speculation. It's not because you have a demand you won't come with great ideas.

    You have many high quality video games' and movies' franchises which where created because there was a demand. They where anticipated yet they managed to surprise and astonish.

    Besides "The first was an idea that generated a game" this is all... useless.

  3. #3
    "Hope is...Hope is not lost."-Trivium

    Nuff Said.

  4. #4
    Originally Posted by jordan_a
    This is pure speculation. It's not because you have a demand you won't come with great ideas.

    You have many high quality video games' and movies' franchises which where created because there was a demand. They where anticipated yet they managed to surprise and astonish.

    Besides "The first was an idea that generated a game" this is all... useless.
    I wouldn't dismiss the notion so quickly, Jordan. It seems you're approaching it from the wrong angle.

    The fact that these franchises managed to surprise and astonish somewhat proves the rule, doesn't it? What the OP wrote doesn't necessarily exclude the possibility of quality in successive episodes of a franchise, it simply states that inspiration (motivation) is of utmost importance in the creation of any art, whether game, movie, music, fiction, and so forth.

    The thing that motivated Ion Storm during the first DX was the creation of a spectacular game. And I'm certain that it's the same thing that motivates the folks in Montreal as well, but it's not as though the studio went to Eidos and begged to be permitted to make a Deus Ex game. Eidos created the studio, told them what to make, and they staffed accordingly. And as we all know, there's a difference between games born of passion and games born of some executive's desire increase the value of his stock options. Some can be good, yes, but most are simply meh. If we're lucky.

    This is not for a moment to say that Montreal won't do a great job. This is not to cast doubt on their abilities. But I think it's something of an insult to anyone who worked on the first DX to presume that DX3 could possibly be as good or better.

    "Deus Ex 3 is an incredible title to be working on, and will also help us attract talent. Real gamers, serious gamers. It’s a big mandate we have received - and we take it very seriously."- Stephane D'Astous

    Of course I hope DX3 will be spectacular, but hope alone should not occlude logic and deductive analysis.

  5. #5
    Originally Posted by OuttaZyme
    Eidos created the studio, told them what to make, and they staffed accordingly. And as we all know, there's a difference between games born of passion and games born of some executive's desire increase the value of his stock options
    I do agree.
    But I maintain this is speculation in the sens that it's useless to talk about that since the only thing that matters is the final product.
    I mean we can chat on many aspects of the game, but we shouldn't, as Trynka does, possibly think in absolute terms like it was ineluctable, destined. 1+1=2 you know what I mean? We can't affirm anything.

  6. #6
    After nearly 5 years of neglect, Deus Ex recently found it's way back onto my PC. At first I didn't think I would be able to play again, having totally abused it repeadedly in the past, testing and retesting all the different ways of keeping Paul Denton alive, searching and exploring every inch of air-vent and sewer line. Once loaded and running, the graphics looked absolutely archaic with it's blocky modeling and low-rez textures. Though after finishing up the first run through Hells Kitchen, when the MiBs handed me all that attitude at UNATCO HQ, I found myself hooked once again.

    It had been long enough that a great portion of the game was forgotten, yet the dialogue, story and atmosphere of the game had survived time. I found myself listening closer, playing more attention to the back-stories and in-game literature. After a few short hours of game-play I began to realize that this really is the greatest PC game ever created. Intelligent, sophisticated, deep and provacative, timely and very well written and researched.

    When I find something this well made, I have to accept that it's nothing less than brilliance. For one moment in time, the powers that be smiled down upon one small band of computer-dorks, and an artistic masterpiece was created. Like Guernica, David, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band, Deus Ex is the pinnacle masterpiece for the PC Game media, so it's not surprising to me that Invisible War, while entertaining, was a massive let down.

    Now we're talking about DX3, and I for one am a bit saddened by the prospect of another lengthy build up to a tragic disappointment. Personally I think the only way to really succeed is to just completely recreate the original with modernized updated graphics. Remodel the characters and settings, update the game engine and physics, find the original actors and re-record the original script. Add a few new scenes and goals, maybe embellish on some of the existing characters. Go back and update the original masterpiece the same way Frank Miller updated Bob Kane and Bill Finger's Batman. Adding new chapters, elements and mythologies to an already ideal distopia would only water down an exceptional creation.

    Finally, and most importantly, create Deus Ex 3 for the PC. I know that greed and money rule the world, that quality product is far less important than units sold, but Deus Ex was created for an open ended platform with limitless possibilites. Creating a Deus Ex title for a dumbed-down Mario market is like making gormet hot-dogs, it just doesn't work.

  7. #7
    Originally Posted by ambroseaz
    After nearly 5 years of neglect, Deus Ex recently found it's way back onto my PC. At first I didn't think I would be able to play again, having totally abused it repeadedly in the past, testing and retesting all the different ways of keeping Paul Denton alive, searching and exploring every inch of air-vent and sewer line. Once loaded and running, the graphics looked absolutely archaic with it's blocky modeling and low-rez textures. Though after finishing up the first run through Hells Kitchen, when the MiBs handed me all that attitude at UNATCO HQ, I found myself hooked once again.

    It had been long enough that a great portion of the game was forgotten, yet the dialogue, story and atmosphere of the game had survived time. I found myself listening closer, playing more attention to the back-stories and in-game literature. After a few short hours of game-play I began to realize that this really is the greatest PC game ever created. Intelligent, sophisticated, deep and provacative, timely and very well written and researched.

    When I find something this well made, I have to accept that it's nothing less than brilliance. For one moment in time, the powers that be smiled down upon one small band of computer-dorks, and an artistic masterpiece was created. Like Guernica, David, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band, Deus Ex is the pinnacle masterpiece for the PC Game media, so it's not surprising to me that Invisible War, while entertaining, was a massive let down.

    Now we're talking about DX3, and I for one am a bit saddened by the prospect of another lengthy build up to a tragic disappointment. Personally I think the only way to really succeed is to just completely recreate the original with modernized updated graphics. Remodel the characters and settings, update the game engine and physics, find the original actors and re-record the original script. Add a few new scenes and goals, maybe embellish on some of the existing characters. Go back and update the original masterpiece the same way Frank Miller updated Bob Kane and Bill Finger's Batman. Adding new chapters, elements and mythologies to an already ideal distopia would only water down an exceptional creation.

    Finally, and most importantly, create Deus Ex 3 for the PC. I know that greed and money rule the world, that quality product is far less important than units sold, but Deus Ex was created for an open ended platform with limitless possibilites. Creating a Deus Ex title for a dumbed-down Mario market is like making gormet hot-dogs, it just doesn't work.

    I understand. My 360 is off at the repair center, so I popped in Invisible War last night; it's just not the same.

    Gourmet hot-dogs are called sausage, and come in many varieties - Bratwurst, Knockwurst, Keilbasa. Modern PC gaming would be nigh impossible without the huge cultural influence of Mario. See the thread entitled "Consoles." Not trying to flame at all, I simply disagree with you.

  8. #8
    I agree with you, I have rarely seen a game that had a good sequel. But then again I liked DX2 very much so I just hope DX3 will be as good as the first, because it cannot be better.