Thread: Your overall opinion

Your overall opinion

  1. #51

    I liked Final Fantasy XIII a lot. I loved how they showed Lightning and how she began to be nicer to the others through out the game. All of the characters were great. I love the music too

  2. #52

    I thought this was the best game ever made


    and the international trailer is the best game trailer ive ever seen

  3. #53

    I dont like FF13 in the gameplay system because hate the RPG in witch one i dont control all the caracters i a battle, i love the way of battle of FF10, thats the mark that make a FF a good game. The battle system of FF 13 its like if i was playing a god of war, heres is no strategy at all, to lay a FF i tha way i prefer to lay castlevania or ubcharted because i the end is the same way. Tis is the reason that F series are not popular like in the psx or ps2

  4. #54

    I liked the game but it's not my fav FF, not even close. I think the game should have had more open areas and some backtracking and towns. There was very little exploration in the game, mainly on Gran Pulse. I wish XV has a bigger world.

  5. #55

    I finally got around to playing Final Fantasy XIII after almost three years of waiting, because I never had enough money to afford a system to play it on. Well after buying a PS3, I have FINALLY been able to play this game!


    I came into playing FF XIII with very guarded feelings, knowing that many people had said horrible things about it, though I had also heard some praise for it as well. I really expected to hate it...


    But, in all honesty, I really like XIII. I can understand the reason that many fans don't like, with the linearity of the game and the completely different battle system than any other in the series, but I liked it for what it was! No, it is not my favorite game in the series at all, but I felt the game was done well enough to give it props for all the hard work that went into it! (Plus, I absolutely LOVE Vanillle, especially after being privy to a phone conversation with her voice actor and Fang's voice actor! ) I feel that the game has a quite a bit of charm, with the wonderful graphics, and yes, the new battle system. I think it fits the feel of the game very well. And, honestly, I didn't mind the linearity either. It felt so awkward once I got to Gran Pulse and I got to do what I wanted.


    Overall, FF XIII is not my favorite in the series, but I did like it enough to go through the whole game, and enjoyed it while I did! I will try to remember not to listen to others opinions before I jump into another video game from now on, considering peoples opinions will always differ!







  6. #56

    I'm really enjoying this game as well. I'm fairly new to Final Fantasy still, but have been captivated by it since first playing Crisis Core on a friend's PSP (Sadly could not finish it). FF XIII is a really good game with lots of story to it, and that's not all. It has interesting, bold, unique characters and settings that capture the player's attention.

  7. #57
    I finally played all the way through FF 13, and I have to say that it was a truly terrible game. This is a real shame because I really loved the Final Fantasy series, FF7 still rates as my favorite game ever. Clearly this was an attempt to recapture the magic of FF7, it even starts off the same way: Main protagonist on train, ex soldier, black sidekick who uses guns. Then you spend the next 40 hours running in a straight line through a hallway. The real sad part was it was clear that the game could have even been great, the story, while overly long and complicated to the point that you had to inclue hundreds of pages of reading just to clear up what the bloody hell everything was and what they were supposed to be doing, was compelling enough to keep my interest, and I loved the redesigned combat system, it was challenging enough to be interesting, and completely new. The best part of FF7 was getting to see the world though, which happens right out of Midgar. Here you run in a straight line right up to the end of the game with no side quests or exploring at all until the last area. I will not be purchasing any spin-offs of this series, not matter what reviews or news that is released about it. Truly, truly awful.

  8. #58
    Originally Posted by imported_Kyle
    I finally played all the way through FF 13, and I have to say that it was a truly terrible game. This is a real shame because I really loved the Final Fantasy series, FF7 still rates as my favorite game ever. Clearly this was an attempt to recapture the magic of FF7, it even starts off the same way: Main protagonist on train, ex soldier, black sidekick who uses guns. Then you spend the next 40 hours running in a straight line through a hallway. The real sad part was it was clear that the game could have even been great, the story, while overly long and complicated to the point that you had to inclue hundreds of pages of reading just to clear up what the bloody hell everything was and what they were supposed to be doing, was compelling enough to keep my interest, and I loved the redesigned combat system, it was challenging enough to be interesting, and completely new. The best part of FF7 was getting to see the world though, which happens right out of Midgar. Here you run in a straight line right up to the end of the game with no side quests or exploring at all until the last area. I will not be purchasing any spin-offs of this series, not matter what reviews or news that is released about it. Truly, truly awful.
    Yep feel the same, too. I love the FFVII game style and the others history before that, like FFI - FFVI. And i'm still waiting a game that we can play in scene that we can walktrough all the maps and fight the find encounter randomly..

  9. #59

    They made one, it's called Final Fantasy Dimensions.

  10. #60

    lol everyone crys about FFXIII, it's not a bad game, and yes it's linear but it's done this way to encourage non jrpg fans to play the game. If you want to go exploring just beat the game, and then grand pulse opens up and you can explore it's open beauty. Theres way more playtime in the after main game side quests than there is during the actual story. And yes everyone still yearns for FFVII remake, but I remember doing all those little side quests and by the time I got to the end I pretty much one shotted sephrioth and that gave me a huge feeling of lack of accomplishment, until in FFXIII where you're capped in your skills so the final boss is actually a challenge, even if he's not the hardest mob in the game.

  11. #61

    Why would you make a JRPG for non JRPG fans? All that does is annoy your main fan base. The reason people play FF is because they like JRPGs, so why make something unrecognizable? It makes no sense. If you would just call it something else and make a proper FF game then odds are the fans wouldn't have been as pissed about it.

  12. #62
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    Oh come on, play 13-2. The gameplay is a little different, and if you liked the battles you should enjoy 13-2 because the battles in 13-2 are like 13 on 'roids. The story doesn't get any less convoluted, and unfortunately to get the whole storyline you have to buy DLC. I like characters, and there isn't much new worth mentioning. Crap, on second thought, if the first one turned you off, might as well stay away now.

  13. #63

    Originally Posted by imported_Kyle


    Why would you make a JRPG for non JRPG fans? All that does is annoy your main fan base. The reason people play FF is because they like JRPGs, so why make something unrecognizable? It makes no sense. If you would just call it something else and make a proper FF game then odds are the fans wouldn't have been as pissed about it.



    It was made with most gamers in mind, but the ones who complained were the American players, not all of them mind you (I'm a NA player, and found it ok).





    In FF7, as much as you say you had "lots of freedom", you didn't. Get out of Midgar, then go to Kalm, then chocobo farm, then the cave, then Junon, and so on. You had the RTS-like Fort Condor and Gold Saucer on the way, but until you get the Highwind, you're stuck following a pre-planned path. Consider the Highwind like reaching Pulse in FF13. In FF8, you started having some freedom in Fisherman's Horizon, and more in Esthar. In FF9, once you get the first airship, then the one not needing Mist. In FF10, once you reach Zanarkand. They all have some linearity.

  14. #64
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    FINAL FANTASY XIII is, in my opinion, a fantastic game (only second to FINAL FANTASY VII in my personal ranking of main FINAL FANTASY titles). It perfectly suits my taste.


    However, anyone is free to think what they want. To each their own. If they like it, then they do. If they don't, then that's it. It's just a game anyway.




  15. #65
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    In my (and Square Enix’s) opinion: it had. Of course there are fans who disagree. But I for one, who don't have much time to spend on playing games, found it much more enjoyable this way. As I said, I am personally glad that they managed to create a game as amazing as FFXIII. (Besides, it sold pretty well, I must say.)

  16. #66


    I'm going to start by saying, final fantasy 13 -2 is the one that started my love for the final fantasy franchise! With that being said, along with ff 13's being my favorite of the ff games to date, this may be a little abyss. I'll do my best though.
    First ff 13. Love the story line! It starts out confusing but the beginning is one of my favorite parts since its bringing in most of the character conflict and goals. The game contains a few to many cinematics, to many for some people to bare. But I rather enjoy them. They continue to get more interesting as the game moves on. As you move along after the first 2 chapters, you quickly realize that the game gets very linear and straight forward by the end of chapter 3 and 4, and my advice is, you gone this far don't give up, cause it gets out of the gutter real soon. In about the middle of the game, a lot of story line conflicts are dealt with which is good, otherwise I would have been to bored to continue. And after that point, the game will stay permanently better throughout the rest of the story. So overall, the story itself, I give a high 8, or a 9. And as for character development, 7 or 8 on some characters, and a 9 on others.
    BATTLE MODE: I for one, really enjoy all the abillities available to use in battle. Had it just been a few moves for each role, for each character. yuck. But in this game techniques, items (never used these much) and other battle options are available. However, for some reason, after awhile, I have a hard time getting to attached to the battle system (after the extensive 131 hours I've played this game) for several reasons. 1. It always needs the opening view before a battle, which consumes a lot of total accumulated time. 2. Healing (though extremely useful) defeats the purpose of items and also, in a sense makes the game way to much easier. I mean all you do is send out a medic and you're covered for the most part. 3. With auto-battle, all you're really doing is pushing x over and over, with an occasional R1 and L1. There are a few positives I would like to mention. The paradigm system, puts a lot of strategy to use. Over the span of time I've played ff 13, I decided to play ff 13 with out ever using crystarium, I did useweapon upgrades, yes), and after having to actually spend a lot of time planning paradigms, I grew to really enjoy the concept. Another thing was all the abillities significant to each individuals roles. Which brings me to staggering, which I like cuase it gives an aim to a battle, to improve defeating opponents.
    Developing- enhancing characters: Rather difficult as far as crystarium goes. You sit there and attend ever battle that is available (until you get far enough into the game) so you can fill out all the crystals available for you in your current crystarim stage. But they do add a lot of abillities to make each role signifcantly useful in different situations. But boy oh boy. Gil... There could have been changes. It's just so time consuming to get a lot of it. All the best ways of farming just kill time. I think it would have been so much better if gil could also be obtained from defeating opponents.
    ...continued....

  17. #67


    So maybe obtaining gil isn't the greatest, but it's still really nice that there are so many different shops to put the money to use.
    The merchandise in the game is actually rather nice opposed to the whole gil fiasco. Its good that this game involves upgrading weapons, along with use of sol's as well. Weapon abilities and combination for added effects brings a whole different planning/strategy in play to this game!
    Missions in this game were kind of a bummer. They're only like mini boss battles, period. I think there could have been challenges outside of just battling...
    Everything leading up to the end of the game was great, including cinematics, the ending itself, and the battles. But once i beat it, i found nothing to do make a goal to max out all my characters crystarium and weapons. (haven't done either yet) but truly, once i beat the game, i had pretty much nothing to do... Which is a a disappointment. I think there could have been things added once you complete the game, but no, only a few more missions are available.
    If there was ever a remake (which there probably won't be, just saying...) the improvements i'd suggest are: Put puzzles that aren't straight forward, Instead of making areas so lengthy and pretty much all battles and walking, make them hard to complete shorter areas instead and include things you need to complete to move forward and such, Create an ATB design like is going to be in lightning returns, Make missions that don't all involve battling, And put in live cinematics, like in ff 13-2

  18. #68

    Originally Posted by Basho
    There is nothing "friendly tip"ish about this topic. All you've done is make an a** out of yourself by pointlessly flaming the best selling FF game yet. Yes, it is a Final Fantasy game. Saying it isn't is either displaying narrow-minded elitism or illiteracy. No, it is not the best game of the series. We all know that. It is strictly linear for 90% of the game, but that makes it so much more enjoyable when you finally reach CH11. It does a lot better job at invoking emotion that the majority of the other FFs and makes you empathize with the characters, which is the POINT of a RPG.If you're saying this "isn't a Final Fantasy game" because of the linearity and new gameplay aspects, they you should also be saying 3 (added the ability to change jobs), 7 (added 3D graphics), 8 (enemies leveled up with you), 10 (added voice acting), 11 (MMO), and 12 (took out the battle screen) "aren't Final Fantasies" because they innovated the technology and gameplay aspects of the game. Every series evolves, if we still got the turn-based system or 2D graphics of the games of old the FF series would flop because those games don't sell well anymore.Also, please work on your English and proofread your posts here. It took me five or six reads of that to understand what you were attempting to say.

    You should probably check your facts. XIII is not the best selling FF, VII is and probably always will be. Saying that was either the result of XIII fanboy white knighting, or just plain ignorance. I'll let the readers decide.

  19. #69

    I don't know why you felt the need to reply to a topic almost a year old, but yes Final Fantasy VII is the top selling Final Fantasy. The game is over 15 years old, and the sales numbers released to the public don't even include digital downloads for the PC or PS3/PSP. The game was wildly popular. As of this year, Final Fantasy XIII is the 4th top selling (After VII, X, and VIII in that order) globally with 6.89 million copies, and the 3rd top selling in North America (after VII and X in that order). I'll include the full numbers in a spoiler below.





    What this person probably got confused with best-selling is fastest-selling. Final Fantasy XIII sold over a million copies in the space of a few weeks, making it the fastest-selling release in the franchise to date.







  20. #70

    I wonder if they set a 'pre-order' record because, I think I had it pre-ordered for about 2 years. lol

  21. #71

    So I finally beat this game a few days ago after I purchased it since it's release here. I have to say I have rather mixed feelings about it; to be honest, I was a bit confused by the whole story of the game. I felt it wasn't that strong, you get branded by the Fal Cie, and then you become a L'Cie, the most hated enemy of Cocoon, therefore are fugitives. However what I didn't quite understand what was the deal with the Fal Cie, I don't understand why they wanted to wage war against each other, and why they wanted destruction so badly? I just felt slightly ripped off for understanding the reasons behind the Fal Cie's motives for destruction - almost like there wasn't any explainable cause, but the fact that it was in their Godly genetics to act out this way. The whole concept, "I'm sick of humans, they are imperfect, it would be entertaining to watch them suffer" is a bit cliche in my opinion.


    The game itself, I found it to be not that bad. I enjoyed it more than Final Fantasy XII, but then again the whole political aspect didn't envoke my interests. The gameplay was a bit boring, and way too linear. Final Fantasy X was linear, but I still had some room to work with (doing a few side things, such as exploration of the city, playing mini games - blitzball for a break to relax, etc.) but I literally felt so exhausted in XIII that I felt like it was way too long to sit. I wish it wouldn't have taken me about close to 2 hours to get through one chapter segment, because honestly I felt like I was going through random places. I guess if they introduced some towns to take a break at, it would have been okay, instead of constantly fighting monsters.


    The battle system, wasn't *that* bad. The auto-system has to go though -- it makes battles really thoughtless and more reliable on your reaction time to do paradigm shifts. I didn't find the actual paradigm shifts to be too bad though - I liked how each character had their own unique combinations of paradigm, and there was some flexibility involved. However, I wish there was more detail to some of the classes; instead of having one large path for the class, I would have had multiple pathways, where maybe for Ravager, I could have had a focus on pure magic, and the other pathway was more Magic-melee style with some strength bonuses involved. I just felt the Crystallurium system was a bit too linear for my tastes, and could have used a bit of tweaking.


    As for the characters themselves, the cast was decent. I still don't buy the whole "Wow, fate all brought us together", I wish there was more time to recruit characters rather than bring 80 % of the cast together at once. Also, maybe we could have had some guest characters or extra characters so the game would feel a bit less linear. I did like the characters though, Lightning is a pretty strong protagonist, and is likeable, but honestly after completing the game, the character who got most of my respect would have to be Vanille. She is a bit silly to begin with, but she really matured by the end of the game, and had a lot of courage to confront her fears, which really made me feel sad that she there at the end (due to an unmentionable circumstance) with the rest of the cast.


    If I were to rate this game myself, I would give it a final rating of being 7/10. It wasn't a bad Final Fantasy game, and I don't regret the entry in this series, but there were still some flaws that lessened the enjoyment value overall.

  22. #72

    Originally Posted by SOULEATERQUEEN


    So I finally beat this game a few days ago after I purchased it since it's release here. I have to say I have rather mixed feelings about it; to be honest, I was a bit confused by the whole story of the game.


    That's not too surprising. I rather enjoy the story, now that I understand it, but the presentation of the story leaves a lot to be desired. To pull it all together, you must scour the datalog, which includes unlocking all of the Analects by completing optional missions. It is also quite helpful to know about the overaching "Fabula Nova Crystalis" mythos that informs FFXIII and its sequels along with FF Type-0 and the (theoretical) FFvs.XIII.


    Fal'Cie are the creations of the divine being Bhunivelze (the Maker). Bhunivelze took full control of the mortal world by killing his mother Mwynn, who passed to the unseen world. Seeking to enter the unseen world without dying, Bhunivelze created the fal'Cie Pulse, Etro, and Lindzei. Pulse was charged with finding the door to the unseen world. Etro's unintentional resemblence to Mwynn disturbed Bhunivelze, and he granted her no power at all. Lindzei was charged with the protection of the world and Bhunivelze. Bhunivelze then entered a deep sleep, waiting until the entrance to the unseen was found.


    Pulse and Lindzei each created numerous lesser fal'Cie to assist them in their tasks. Etro, despairing because she had no purpose, killed herself, and her blood gave birth to humanity. Etro passed to the unseen world, where she found Mwynn being consumed by chaos. Etro charged by Mwynn to preserve the balance between the worlds. She did this by placing a bit of chaos within each human (granting them their "hearts").


    Fal'Cie by their nature are limited in scope and in power. They can only act in accordance with their purpose, or to defend themselves, and they only have as much power as was granted to them at creation. They are even more restricted than l'Cie are; a l'Cie still has a choice about whether or not to pursue their focus, even if the potential consequences are unpleasant. Fal'Cie are denied even that level of free will. They can't even commit suicide by inaction; if challenged, they must defend themselves.


    It is primarily the limitation on power that causes fal'Cie to use l'Cie as tools. Because of the chaos they harbor, humans are potentially unlimited in power; by turning humans into l'Cie, the fal'Cie can access potentially unlimited power.


    With that in mind, let's take a closer look at Barthandelus. Barthandelus is created by Lindzei to construct and maintain Cocoon. That is Barthandelus's purpose (one that he cannot directly act against), but it is not his primary motivation. His motivation--one possibly shared by most or all fal'Cie--is to bring back Bhunivelze, which can only happen if a door to the unseen world is found. It is unclear whether this motivation is inspired by Lindzei.


    Thus we come to the plot of the game: a convoluted, centuries-old plan conceived and orchestrated by Barthandelus, with the ultimate goal of opening a gate to the unseen world. Instead of searching for a physical door, as Pulse and his creations are doing (Atomos searches the earth, Dahaka searches the sky), Barthandelus saw that the death of a human opens a small and fleeting gate to the unseen world. He postulated that a sufficient quantity of simultaneous human death would force that gate wide open. An obvious way to arrange for that level of death is the destruction of Cocoon. However, he is bound by his purpose and unable to take any direct action that works against the preservation of Cocoon. This limitation extends to any l'Cie that he personally creates: he cannot grant a focus opposed to his purpose.


    Consequently, he fosters animosity among other fal'Cie upon the world of Pulse, in particular Anima, by abrogating the realms of those fal'Cie while creating Cocoon. These fal'Cie, unconnected to Cocoon, are able to create l'Cie who have the focus of destroying Cocoon. Over the centuries, he manipulates the lives of each l'Cie who is granted such a focus, trying to build up their power to the point where they are actually capable of fulfilling the focus. He eventually succeeds in this with the events in the game, but is thwarted in his ultimate goal by Fang and Vanille's unconventional use of Ragnarok.


    Does that help to make more sense of things?

  23. #73

    Originally Posted by tiornys


    Originally Posted by SOULEATERQUEEN


    So I finally beat this game a few days ago after I purchased it since it's release here. I have to say I have rather mixed feelings about it; to be honest, I was a bit confused by the whole story of the game.


    That's not too surprising. I rather enjoy the story, now that I understand it, but the presentation of the story leaves a lot to be desired. To pull it all together, you must scour the datalog, which includes unlocking all of the Analects by completing optional missions. It is also quite helpful to know about the overaching "Fabula Nova Crystalis" mythos that informs FFXIII and its sequels along with FF Type-0 and the (theoretical) FFvs.XIII.


    Fal'Cie are the creations of the divine being Bhunivelze (the Maker). Bhunivelze took full control of the mortal world by killing his mother Mwynn, who passed to the unseen world. Seeking to enter the unseen world without dying, Bhunivelze created the fal'Cie Pulse, Etro, and Lindzei. Pulse was charged with finding the door to the unseen world. Etro's unintentional resemblence to Mwynn disturbed Bhunivelze, and he granted her no power at all. Lindzei was charged with the protection of the world and Bhunivelze. Bhunivelze then entered a deep sleep, waiting until the entrance to the unseen was found.


    Pulse and Lindzei each created numerous lesser fal'Cie to assist them in their tasks. Etro, despairing because she had no purpose, killed herself, and her blood gave birth to humanity. Etro passed to the unseen world, where she found Mwynn being consumed by chaos. Etro charged by Mwynn to preserve the balance between the worlds. She did this by placing a bit of chaos within each human (granting them their "hearts").


    Fal'Cie by their nature are limited in scope and in power. They can only act in accordance with their purpose, or to defend themselves, and they only have as much power as was granted to them at creation. They are even more restricted than l'Cie are; a l'Cie still has a choice about whether or not to pursue their focus, even if the potential consequences are unpleasant. Fal'Cie are denied even that level of free will. They can't even commit suicide by inaction; if challenged, they must defend themselves.


    It is primarily the limitation on power that causes fal'Cie to use l'Cie as tools. Because of the chaos they harbor, humans are potentially unlimited in power; by turning humans into l'Cie, the fal'Cie can access potentially unlimited power.


    With that in mind, let's take a closer look at Barthandelus. Barthandelus is created by Lindzei to construct and maintain Cocoon. That is Barthandelus's purpose (one that he cannot directly act against), but it is not his primary motivation. His motivation--one possibly shared by most or all fal'Cie--is to bring back Bhunivelze, which can only happen if a door to the unseen world is found. It is unclear whether this motivation is inspired by Lindzei.


    Thus we come to the plot of the game: a convoluted, centuries-old plan conceived and orchestrated by Barthandelus, with the ultimate goal of opening a gate to the unseen world. Instead of searching for a physical door, as Pulse and his creations are doing (Atomos searches the earth, Dahaka searches the sky), Barthandelus saw that the death of a human opens a small and fleeting gate to the unseen world. He postulated that a sufficient quantity of simultaneous human death would force that gate wide open. An obvious way to arrange for that level of death is the destruction of Cocoon. However, he is bound by his purpose and unable to take any direct action that works against the preservation of Cocoon. This limitation extends to any l'Cie that he personally creates: he cannot grant a focus opposed to his purpose.


    Consequently, he fosters animosity among other fal'Cie upon the world of Pulse, in particular Anima, by abrogating the realms of those fal'Cie while creating Cocoon. These fal'Cie, unconnected to Cocoon, are able to create l'Cie who have the focus of destroying Cocoon. Over the centuries, he manipulates the lives of each l'Cie who is granted such a focus, trying to build up their power to the point where they are actually capable of fulfilling the focus. He eventually succeeds in this with the events in the game, but is thwarted in his ultimate goal by Fang and Vanille's unconventional use of Ragnarok.


    Does that help to make more sense of things?



    Wow, this is pretty amazing. I wish I had known about this and looked at the story further.


    However I still have a few unanswered questions:


    Who is Orphan or what is Orphan in all of this?


    What exactly is Ragnarok?


    The unseen world = Valhalla, correct? How did Lightning enter this place? (be aware that I haven't finished XIII-2 but I think I heard she is the reincarnation of the Goddess Etro, but I wouldn't imagine that Lightning decides to commit suicide)


    If Rosch knew the truth about the Fal Cie, and the L'Cie, why did he keep turning against the party until the very end?





    Thanks so much for your input, it really helps a lot!

  24. #74

    Originally Posted by SOULEATERQUEEN


    Wow, this is pretty amazing. I wish I had known about this and looked at the story further.


    However I still have a few unanswered questions:


    Who is Orphan or what is Orphan in all of this?


    Orphan is the fal'Cie that powers all of the other fal'Cie in Cocoon. If you think of Cocoon as a giant machine with the fal'Cie as various components and controllers of that machine, then Orphan is the main power supply.


    What exactly is Ragnarok?


    This is not well explained. Ragnarok is a specialized form that Fang and Vanille can transform into, and it is capable of killing fal'Cie.


    The unseen world = Valhalla, correct? How did Lightning enter this place? (be aware that I haven't finished XIII-2 but I think I heard she is the reincarnation of the Goddess Etro, but I wouldn't imagine that Lightning decides to commit suicide)


    Valhalla exists in the unseen world. How Lightning gets there is something that is explained during FFXIII-2. Basically,
    .


    If Rosch knew the truth about the Fal Cie, and the L'Cie, why did he keep turning against the party until the very end?


    I don't think he really understood the truth. I think he believed the general propaganda about the evilness of Pulse, and I don't think he knew that Barthandelus was trying to get Cocoon destroyed. He knew that the "Purge" was actually about killing the people, not exporting them, but he was willing to do that because he believed it was for the greater good.

  25. #75

    Originally Posted by tiornys
    Orphan is the fal'Cie that powers all of the other fal'Cie in Cocoon. If you think of Cocoon as a giant machine with the fal'Cie as various components and controllers of that machine, then Orphan is the main power supply.


    This is accurate, but on top of that Orphan appears to have been the first fal'Cie constructed by Lindzei, and constructed specifically for the purpose of providing power to Cocoon. As an aside to this subject,it was revealed in the Final Fantasy XIII Ultimania that the 'first' form of Orphan, the sword-like construct which possesses Barthandelus' face, is meant to represent the theme of 'Sin and Salvation' common through both of the games so far. The golden, slightly feminine half (which vaguely resembles one of the logos) is supposed to represent Barthandelus' idea of Lindzei's form, and it is at least implied (although the translation I've seen outright states) that Barthandelus and many of the other fal'Cie of Cocoon have never met their parent god.





    It's also worth noting that while the fal'Cie are bound to their purpose like machines or the Judeo-Christian angels, they appear to have at least some wiggle room. As the Orphanized Barthandelus says, "Too frail a shell, and humans should not thrive. Too stout a shell and they would not die." So, while the Cocoon fal'Cie cannot strike Cocoon down or cause it to fall through the failure of the world's systems, they can make sure the structure of the world is weak enough that a crash would almost certainly destroy all life aboard.


    Originally Posted by tiornys
    This is not well explained. Ragnarok is a specialized form that Fang and Vanille can transform into, and it is capable of killing fal'Cie.


    My understanding from the datalog entries and small snippets in the Ultimania is that Ragnarok is a beast born from the crystal power of a l'Cie interacting with the fragment of Chaos that exists in every human heart. It is, essentially, a manifestation of the 'limitless power' the fal'Cie all hope to harness when they make l'Cie of human beings. It is implied that the form of Ragnarok may change depending on who becomes the beast, and as I recall it was offhandedly mentioned that the form of Ragnarok that Fang and Vanille become together has characteristics from both of their Eidolons.


    Originally Posted by tiornys
    Valhalla exists in the unseen world. How Lightning gets there is something that is explained during FFXIII-2. Basically,
    .


    This is a little difficult to pin down. Although Valhalla is mentioned as being the Unseen Realm, the XIII-2 Ultimania describes it as a sort of halfway dimension that souls pass through on their way to whatever comes next. The novel 'Fragments After' says that nobody knows what comes next, and theorizes that human souls may be consumed by Chaos, pass on to some 'other place', or simply be flung into the Void and destroyed.


    Originally Posted by tiornys
    I don't think he really understood the truth. I think he believed the general propaganda about the evilness of Pulse, and I don't think he knew that Barthandelus was trying to get Cocoon destroyed. He knew that the "Purge" was actually about killing the people, not exporting them, but he was willing to do that because he believed it was for the greater good.


    This is fairly on the money. Yaag Rosch realizes very quickly that the l'Cie are not actually mindless, vicious monsters out to destroy Cocoon but feels they must be put down in order to quiet the minds of the people. I believe he even says as much to Snow in Palumpolum, when he asks if the lives of the l'Cie were worth more than the lives of the panicking innocents. He knew that the world was full of incredibly xenophobic people, and that fullscale riots would surely result from a failure to put the l'Cie down.





    There are some more important bits that could do with mentioning, but it's not good to talk about them until one has beaten XIII-2.

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