Thread: Teaching Vampire Play Styles

Teaching Vampire Play Styles

  1. #1

    Teaching Vampire Play Styles

    In my experience, I've seen players go about fighting as vampires in one of two ways and unfortunately they don't mesh well. These styles would be hit and run and brawling. Hit and run seems to be the obvious choice to players at above newcomer level since vampires have abilities that are geared towards damage mitigation/negation or movement. The higher level of playing style moves on to coordinating attacks to try to steamroll the human team or expert divide and conquer.

    What gets me killed a lot of times in public games is that players seem to default to hit and run for some reason and don't brawl to kill when humans are weak and at very low health. I see a lot of people doing poke damage and hitting Evasion, Ignore Pain, or Deathly Shield when they're at about half-health or higher and bail on the fight. Where seemingly that vampire and myself were about to kill 2 humans, I'm suddenly left trying to finish the fight or hope someone else will jump in. That's usually a losing scenario. Naturally the human player will heal at first indication that the area is clear of danger.

    I'm curious if anyone has any ideas or made any observations about people making the leap to the higher level play styles. Brawling is fun and makes for an energetic, fast game. I've seen very few games ever where the vampire team patiently waited to make kills without being killed in return. It's doable, but that's still on a high level of playing skill.

  2. #2
    I'll brawl if the humans have been dispersed/distracted by AoE or at least two incapacitated in some way. I'm OK with waiting for my team to arrive, but can get confused what to do after we're all in position. I don't always know who should go first. If I'm a Reaver or Summoner and everyone's in position, I'll usually throw in a bomb of some sort (and follow with kick or pounce as Reaver once a bit their health is gone) or ghouls or if I know I can get close with Disguise without being spotted right away (I have trouble judging whether they will), I'll follow that with infect, immediately hit shroud and try to get in a few strikes on by way out. Other classes can potentially open using incapacitations, but I try to avoid that since I'm less sure I can pull those off without being focused by all four.
    Last edited by Vampmaster; 4th Mar 2016 at 11:24.
    "If events are matched closely enough to course, they have a way of restructuring themselves to familiar outcomes." ~ Scorpius, Farscape

  3. #3
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    In truth, I've always followed the hit and run style regardless of the class. Its just proven to be more successful for me in the game.

  4. #4
    Thats when mastery of vampires play comes in. To know when to stay and when to run. I think the best class to learn to calibrate to stay or not is enraged tyrant. You can either choose to stay and deal enormous damage if situation is right or die in few seconds after that huge mountain gets focused. Situational awerness and knowing how good your skills are is the key to that. Master it and then suddenly youll notice increased numbers of double and triple kills. Maybe even a quad if your lucky ;p

  5. #5
    Everyone knows that class loadouts built for hit and run or a great ability to solo are popular and I think it's because of what I talked about above. They have higher survivability without depending on others. I use them from time to time as I enjoy a reaver with Sweeping Kick and Shadow Step. I just hate when the round slows down because the vamps are basically poking but allowing the humans to heal and consequently the vamps aren't. Making takedowns and wiping the whole team or forcing 1 or 2 to retreat is necessary for vamps to maintain health. If no one brawls, the vampires get whittled down over and over again and that's not a winning strategy.

  6. #6
    Originally Posted by GenFeelGood
    In truth, I've always followed the hit and run style regardless of the class. Its just proven to be more successful for me in the game.
    Same. Though I'm trying to rely less on it, with varying success.

  7. #7
    I think the play styles could be covered in the tutorials...which, quite frankly, does need some work. (They're so short and rushed, only the Hunter and Reaver ones aren't)

    Btw, my personal experience is that my team usually prefers to brawl and keep dying.

  8. #8
    I'm far from high level, so maybe I'm talking out of my , but my strategy as vampire is one of constantly going in, then out to reassess the situation and immediately going back in. As of late I mostly use Reaver, so I'll use him as an example:

    - Take position, ping "in position" to team and wait for them to do the same
    - Throw my AoE (usually poison gas)
    - When rest of the team goes in, look for an isolated human (usually the Scout), go behind him, sweeping kick him in the neck and melee him until he dies
    - Break line of sight with the rest of the humans (climb a short building, turn a corner, jump down a hole, whatever) and reassess the situation
    - Go back in, melee weakest human while kick finishes getting off cooldown (usually 2 seconds left or so by this point) and then kick next human if any are still alive
    - Eat

    Of course, any step of that flow is interchangeable with "pop evasion and run" if I am getting focused by everyone or if one of the humans is better than me (or just lucky) and is clearly winning the 1v1.

    I find this to be confortable a mix between "hit 'n' run" and full on brawling. Would really love if some more experienced players post their "battle flow" to compare and learn from.
    Last edited by Bazielim; 17th Mar 2016 at 20:27. Reason: tou 3

  9. #9
    Originally Posted by Lilyafastics
    I find this to be confortable a mix between "hit 'n' run" and full on brawling. Would really love if some more experienced players post their "battle flow" to compare and learn from.
    An indicator that the team is going to brawl is how swiftly one of the humans can be taken out. Usually if I see or participate in 2 vampires burning their abilities to kill a human in a matter of seconds, then it's go time, even if one of those two needs to burn their defensive ability. That vampire will return in a moment to add to the rest of the engagement and simply needs to break line of sight to stop being focused. Just be aware of where all the humans are at and watch for health bars.

    When you're hurt, the easiest way to return to the fight is to get behind humans or at least out of direct focus and use a fully charged melee attack. You'll aid your allies and subsequently stop them from taking as much damage. Lastly, it's key to pay attention to when that first human died because a scout or someone with a strong AoE ability will return for some low-health kills.

  10. #10
    Sun Tzu said something to the effect of "If you're not 100% that you're going to win don't pounce a scout standing between two alchemists you moron holy ." Paraphrasing, obviously.
    I like to brawl, but I seriously dislike being the first to go in, and when I don't have good communication with my team it's very easy to lose track of where the other hunters are. If I'm brawling with two humans and I get down to half health, I'll try to peace out in case their friends decide to focus me. It's just really hard to tell when it's safe to stay or not.

  11. #11
    Originally Posted by cinnelwood
    Sun Tzu said something to the effect of "If you're not 100% that you're going to win don't pounce a scout standing between two alchemists you moron holy ." Paraphrasing, obviously.
    I like to brawl, but I seriously dislike being the first to go in, and when I don't have good communication with my team it's very easy to lose track of where the other hunters are. If I'm brawling with two humans and I get down to half health, I'll try to peace out in case their friends decide to focus me. It's just really hard to tell when it's safe to stay or not.
    Thanks for that, I laughed pretty good.

    Your last sentence may be a big part of the problem I'm experiencing; knowing when vampires are disengaging. I imagine the simple remedy would be working, crystal clear voice chat. It may be as simple as that for PUGs.

  12. #12
    It's a bit easier to witness effective vampire strategy when you're a human getting stomped. On the other side, you don't always know what did the trick; you just jumped in the fray at best opportunity and moments later stood among four corpses ready to slake your thirst. Clearly your team did something right, or perhaps the opposition merely did something wrong? You were too busy clawing at your target to see for certain.

    In my experience, the most successful brawlers have impeccable timing with tag-team swaps. As I blast away at the vamp engaging me, I feel rather optimistic to see their health dropping faster than mine. Suddenly, a challenger appears! This new dance partner body-blocks my imminent kill and finishes me. This continues throughout the match. Add insult to injury if the one I can't finish doesn't even possess an escape ability, such as a raging Turelim.

    To do this, they must first synchronize their engagement, or else my target would quickly succumb to focus fire. Tyrants with Enrage are a common ingredient in this recipe, having the capability to soak up damage and dish it out twofold, but even more so with his capacity to stun. Two is often devastating, but one can do very well with support from such as a dominating Deceiver. A Melchahim accompanied by stalkers is also a most unwelcome interruption. What better way to survive than to have another take your place? You might even get another hit in yourself if you are careful not to land back in front.

    Many players incline toward hit-and-run due to class loadout. I certainly will if equipped with abilities like Evasion, Takeoff, Ignore Pain, Shroud, or Deathly Shield. I'll consider it as my role; I shall harass so that others may smash. But like others have noted, it's mostly situational. If you find yourself in melee dying faster than you can kill (a symptom of failed initiation), the reflex is to book it and pray one of your fellow vampires is able to finish the job. However, if you can manage a single kill even if it means dying immediately afterward, you are likely to stay. Trading one for one is not the path to victory, but one hopes to tip the balance in doing so, letting the team achieve at least 4-3 if not 4-1.

    It's interesting to note that each class may choose skills more suitable for brawling, like Haste, Enrage, Dive Bomb, Illusions, or Abyssal Barrier. Imagine a whole team geared without escape, favoring full committal. [Okay, Air Strike is better than Dive Bomb is almost every way as a damage skill, but it would be cool to see DB used in such a tactical manner: to join in with a stagger and potentially more damage than AS.]

    As noted, communication is key to coordination. Time is of utmost importance, followed by awareness of surroundings. The recent nonverbal 'ping' markers are helpful but always outmatched by voice. But the thing about voice is that it comes hand-in-hand with a party (due to abysmal in-game PTT), and simply having teammates you know and trust is an immense boon in itself. I often notice that I am the only player making frequent use of markers. Most utilize it only to spot the enemy group before engagement, while I like to ping mid-fight. I always try to center it directly, as a red marker speaks much louder than a blue one. I don't mark my own target unless I need help, so I usually attempt to mark a human not yet engaged, especially one farther out. A respawned human returning to battle is a total ping magnet. When queued solo, it's all I've got besides telepathy.
    Last edited by gnome_dome; 30th Mar 2016 at 21:37.