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Thread: 47 as a character

  1. #51
    Ok guys calm down. I guess the point is clear. Arvin, with your last couple of comments you are agreeing that he is pretty emotionless. And in turn you are agreeing that he isn't some kind of fighter for justice (which is why its still being debated here).
    In your own words, 47 is neither good nor evil. He does what he has to do. Not for justice, but simply because its what he does.

    -I'm almost finished with the first novel now (Enemy within). Its a surprising good read. If you haven't read it yet I recommend it.

  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by IamRahx View Post
    Ok guys calm down. I guess the point is clear. Arvin, with your last couple of comments you are agreeing that he is pretty emotionless. And in turn you are agreeing that he isn't some kind of fighter for justice (which is why its still being debated here).
    In your own words, 47 is neither good nor evil. He does what he has to do. Not for justice, but simply because its what he does.

    -I'm almost finished with the first novel now (Enemy within). Its a surprising good read. If you haven't read it yet I recommend it.
    finally some one understanding what i'm saying
    and thanks for recommand that novel.But I usually snoop around anything that matters to hitman.

  3. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by Arvin47 View Post
    I said 10 times ago..............I played all hitman series.and i say for 11th time i played all hitman series and i'm not talking about absolution forget absolution i'm talking about past titles.now if you read damnation you understand he is a good guy!!!
    I've read whole Damnation. I suppose you talking about (novel spoiler ahead)
    I would say he isn't able to feel something higher than "likeness", what doesn't make him a "good guy".
    You apparently forget he kills for money, what rather isn't ethical. I think any other "higher" reason like deliver justice would make him more like fanatic, than calculating strategist.

    EDIT:
    But i admit 47 isn't so evil, and there are more evil fictitious murderers. Even some of his targets are more evil, what isn't flaw to me.

  4. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by kewlak View Post
    I've read whole Damnation. I suppose you talking about (novel spoiler ahead)
    I would say he isn't able to feel something higher than "likeness", what doesn't make him a "good guy".
    You apparently forget he kills for money, what rather isn't ethical. I think any other "higher" reason like deliver justice would make him more like fanatic, than calculating strategist.

    EDIT:
    But i admit 47 isn't so evil, and there are more evil fictitious murderers. Even some of his targets are more evil, what isn't flaw to me.
    I agree.

  5. #55
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    I think the themes of 47’s humanity are important for the character. He wasn’t born the same as us, nor was he raised in an environment where emotion was encouraged. He was raised in a brutal environment where attachments and emotion were violently frowned upon. His pet rabbit was taken from him because it stirred human emotion in him. He clearly has emotion. He’s displayed affection, remorse, anger, etcetera in the game series prior to Absolution, so it’s not exactly shocking that encountering someone who he can relate to on such a high level would summon up empathy like Victoria did.

    The differences he has from a normal person are why he’s so detached from everyone else. He doesn’t have a mother, and the closest thing he had to a father only saw him as a tool to remove problems. He’s capable of having friends like Vittorio and Diana, though they are very distant or professional relationships. He’s capable of caring for a pet, but if said pet becomes a liability he will eliminate them.

    47 has emotion, he just doesn’t know how to react to said emotions. This does not mean he’s not cold, calculating, and extremely deadly, but it’s a very important part of his character and is what makes him interesting. If he’s simply a murder machine then there’s no distinction between him and the Mr. 48 line of clones, who didn’t have emotion or free will.

    As for the morality of what he does, that depends on your personal ethics. He clearly has an idea of what he views as right and wrong, but it's not what ultimately guides him as a character. He's a consummate professional who's devoted to his craft, and as such he cares more about his professional ethics than broader morality. After all, his craft is one that most people would find morally repugnant.
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  6. #56
    Quote Originally Posted by Master Taffer View Post
    I think the themes of 47’s humanity are important for the character. He wasn’t born the same as us, nor was he raised in an environment where emotion was encouraged. He was raised in a brutal environment where attachments and emotion were violently frowned upon. His pet rabbit was taken from him because it stirred human emotion in him. He clearly has emotion. He’s displayed affection, remorse, anger, etcetera in the game series prior to Absolution, so it’s not exactly shocking that encountering someone who he can relate to on such a high level would summon up empathy like Victoria did.

    The differences he has from a normal person are why he’s so detached from everyone else. He doesn’t have a mother, and the closest thing he had to a father only saw him as a tool to remove problems. He’s capable of having friends like Vittorio and Diana, though they are very distant or professional relationships. He’s capable of caring for a pet, but if said pet becomes a liability he will eliminate them.

    47 has emotion, he just doesn’t know how to react to said emotions. This does not mean he’s not cold, calculating, and extremely deadly, but it’s a very important part of his character and is what makes him interesting. If he’s simply a murder machine then there’s no distinction between him and the Mr. 48 line of clones, who didn’t have emotion or free will.

    As for the morality of what he does, that depends on your personal ethics. He clearly has an idea of what he views as right and wrong, but it's not what ultimately guides him as a character. He's a consummate professional who's devoted to his craft, and as such he cares more about his professional ethics than broader morality. After all, his craft is one that most people would find morally repugnant.
    yeah he have some emotions but he have not some other emotions.for example anger is what a killer need or being capable to being friend with some guys who are helping him.....but what i say is don't bring useless and worthless emotions to 47's personality.for example love or se*uality is not emotions that a killer needs.one of that things that is worthy for us in his character is that 47 don't have se*uality.for example some of women in a dance with devil level say to him:hey there s*xy.and he don't care and keep walking to kill his target...and it make him cold and interesting.

  7. #57
    The only reason 47 only kill bad guys is because of the writers. The writers are scared to have 47 kill nice people because they think that the audience will not play it. Because of these bad writing decisions 47 never seems like a Hitman for hire but rather a pawn for the agency.

  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by 123 View Post
    The writers are scared to have 47 kill nice people because they think that the audience will not play it.
    No, not necessarily. It could be that because 47 is so expensive, his clients must be rich and likewise want to protect their assets from powerful people. There are many examples of "normal" people (i.e. not villains in the traditional sense) 47 has killed -- especially in Blood Money.

    I do think there is some truth in what you write though. Personally, I find it much more satisfying when I eliminate dark characters like in Beldingford Manor and Meat King than when I go for an otherwise neutral target (like in A New Life or You Better Watch Out). There's something about seeing first hand the crimes committed by my targets...it definitely elicits a feeling that I must deliver justice.

  9. #59
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    I think Enemy Within does need to be considered canon (if you're going to consider Absolution as canon) as it was stated that the novel was a prequel to Absolution.

    Overall, I've really enjoyed reading this thread as I've questioned 47's character and what makes him tick many times. Overall, I agree that he is cold and calculated, and he is definitely impaired when it comes to empathy and human emotion. However, as so many of you have noted, he is a human, and humans learn and grow. To a large extent, the nature of his work has hindered any emotional development he may have been able to make. Yet, it is his capacity for emotion that makes him dangerous and unpredictable. The 48 series were created so that they would not have this capacity, and they would have no free will, making them completely and unquestionably loyal to Ort-Meyer. However, this proved to be their downfall. 47 can think for himself, and this does cause him to question.

    He questions his own choices sometimes. We even see him experience regret in SA. However, he chooses to go back to the Agency as he realises he can never really find peace anywhere else. Perhaps he recognises that he is flawed, and decides that there's no point trying to be someone he's not. As he says: "Always knew I didn't belong in this world. I wasn't made for this." However, the events of SA do change him. He resolves to "choose the truth I like" and "seek justice for myself" which suggests to me that he is searching for some morality. NOT that he is a justice fighter or anything naff like that, but his questioning nature and search for truth keeps him at the anti-hero level. Without that, he would just be an evil killer. He's not the villain and he's not the hero – it's that ambiguity that keeps him interesting. The fact that he's even unsure of who he is himself furthers that ambiguity. I do love that.

    In terms of his caring side - he is NOT emotional, but he does experience emotion. Certainly to a lesser degree than other people, but that can be accounted for in his upbringing. However, the novels (are we considering ALL of these to be canon?? Tricky...) show that Ort-Meyer first became concerned about 47 when he saw him caring for a pet rabbit. Even as a child, 47 showed a nurturing side that was not supposed to be present. We also see him express anger as a child, when he kills a fellow clone who was bullying him. I think this ties into his "relationship" with Diana - I think she cares for him a lot more than he does for her, most likely because he does not yet possess the capacity to do so. In BM, when she tells him that she thinks she won't last much longer before being killed, he simply replies "I'm sorry to hear that," before going on to ask about his fee directly afterwards. However, he does show appreciation for her, and his discomfort at having her as a target in Absolution and his decision to let her live fits with his character for me. He notes clearly in Absolution that he and Diana "had trust" and in SA, when he says: "But I'll never forget – those who betrayed me, and those who never failed my trust," she is one of the only people I can think he means.

    Similarly with the bird in BM - I think a previous poster was probably right when they suggested that he bought the bird as a precaution against gases - I really don't see him going to a pet store to pick out a pet for himself. However, I do agree that he clearly developed a relationship with the bird and we see him being quite playful with it - before killing it when his position is compromised.

    Even though I really hated the Absolution story (soooo weak) I did understand his protection of Victoria (even though the scene with him carrying her out of the orphanage was painfully out of character). He killed Ort-Meyer partly because of what Ort-Meyer had done to him. I don't think he wanted that to ever happen again. Meeting Victoria brought back plenty of asylum memories for him, and it brought up some anger. Protecting her and shutting down the cloning technology makes sense to me for his character. Of course, there were PLENTY of other problems with that whole storyline, but I don't think Absolution was completely out of character for 47. Based on previous games, the novels and the situation he was in, I think he reacted as we might have expected him to.

    For his character progression, I'd like to see him continue to question. This does not mean that he needs to be moral and good, because honestly, that would be so boring and predictable and like countless other games. But in each game so far, he does retain a sense of the moral high ground, and he does grow and develop as a person. With the recent double cross by Diana and Travis' betrayal of him, it gives him new facets of humanity to consider, just like in SA. I hope we see him learn and adapt from that. He's proven himself to be nothing if not adaptable.

    Yikes - sorry for the essay. If anyone reads it.

  10. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by 123 View Post
    The only reason 47 only kill bad guys is because of the writers. The writers are scared to have 47 kill nice people because they think that the audience will not play it. Because of these bad writing decisions 47 never seems like a Hitman for hire but rather a pawn for the agency.
    I see what you're saying but 47 doesn't murder for his own satisfaction (completely) and it is more about displaying precision and perfoming the hits efficiently, he sees it as an art. The killing of civilians will in no way benefit him because they're deaths will create questions and further interest in the scenario which will eventually get too messy. In terms of killing nice people I think one needs to think, if someone was nice, why would they be marked for assassination? If the client was paying for the hit because of a personal vendetta rather than the target being evil, I'm sure 47 would have no issue carrying out the hit.

  11. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by 123 View Post
    This is a cool topic and all but Hitman is a video game not a movie.
    That's what hitman done well,the story is like a movie.Obviously we don't want to see a game with a childish story because developers wanted to put more energy on gameplay.I really loved the plot of all hitman games,except Codename 47,(because it's plot is just as what you want,short and weak) and Absolution (because they made 47 as a hero,and emotional,and the only thing that developers focused on,was story which is a mistake as well)
    The games aren't a Gameplay VS Story battle,all of the aspects of a game should help each other to make a nice game.I'm against the argue that story should be weaker for the sake of Gameplay.because a nice story can't harm the gameplay,it just can help it.

    Now about 47 character:
    Agent 47 is a highly trained Assassin,nothing can stop him,he's calculated,strong,smart and fast.he can handle any situation calmly.he's very polite and he rarely speaks,he's most of the time alone,thinking about his past and future,he have no house,he usually stays at hotel at night,in the missions,he just get the job done and get out of area when his target is lying in a body container and police officers are talking in front of it,and they have no idea that someone is killed and his body is there!!!he can do both,gun battle,close combat,but to leave no traces,he prefers to kill only his target.he's a contract killer who works for money.and he have some other unknown motivations for it,but obviously,it's not saving a girl!!!he's not emotional.
    Last edited by Arvin47; 27th Jan 2015 at 06:37.

  12. #62
    Video games can do things that movies can't so they needn't try to make hitman like a movie. The kind of missions 47 does shows his objectivity, showing that he'll kill anyone. i want to see what his clients at least 90% of the time. The kind of people he'll work for also shows 47's character. The back ground stories in absolution were pretty good. There were like 100 different subplots going on in every mission. Thats one of the few thing that they should keep from absolution. All this stuff is happening around him tragedy comedy and yet 47 remains unphased and indifferent.

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