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Thread: SARIF INDUSTRIES - Human Augmentation & Tech (Real Life)-New: First Head Transplant

SARIF INDUSTRIES - Human Augmentation & Tech (Real Life)-New: First Head Transplant

  1. #776
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    2014 News and the crazy technologies of today.

    So I was watching the news today and the were showing all sorts of technology being used in medicine even today. 3D printers are going to be able to make organs out of stem cells, the deaf are being able to hear again through implants, and people have already been able to move prosthetics through electrodes in the shoulder that transmit signals to the rest of a fake arm. Ever since I completed the Director's Cut a month ago, I have been seeing real life references to augmentation technology everywhere. 2027 is only 13 years away and this stuff is getting more similar all the time :P Almost scary, considering the dystopia that could be created. I guess only time will tell when man's reach really will exceed his grasp.

    -Savier

  2. #777
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    Its so interesting, isn't it? This technology will vastly improve peoples' lives and this fills me with joy.
    Unfortunately, we already witness dystopia today: human oppression, misery, overcrowding and disease so there is little point being scared of what the future might bring; we just need to deal with it. We can and should become more than human. Still human, but transcended - mentally, physically and spiritually. It really is about time we left the cradle... no?

    Latest articles, fyi:

    Brain Augmentation: What’s the Deal?
    Virtually every single one of the atoms within your brain will be replaced within a few years, and many in quite less time. What does that make you think about? It makes me think of brain augmentation.

    If our brains are essentially just blueprints that are being filled in with atoms, and it doesn’t have to be the same atoms for it to be the same brain, just the same types of atoms, does it change the nature of the discussion if I suggest that we should replace minuscule, microscopic portions of our biological brains with something else, something far more efficient, capable of always being connected to the Internet ?
    Read full article here:
    http://hplusmagazine.com/2014/08/21/...on-whats-deal/
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  3. #778
    Originally Posted by Viktoria
    Latest articles, fyi:

    Brain Augmentation: What’s the Deal?

    Read full article here:
    http://hplusmagazine.com/2014/08/21/...on-whats-deal/
    Brain viruses & malware. I'm calling it now.

  4. #779
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    Hehe, any positives?
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  5. #780
    Originally Posted by Viktoria
    Hehe, any positives?
    I don't think it's even possible. A brain actually connecting to the internet is like molecular assemblers (i.e. nanites), they make good philosophical discussions and are fun to read in a non-realistic magazines, but the science required for them is so far off it can be considered impossible at least in our lifetime. The author of that article is wrong when he connotes that a brain is just a "blueprint" and atoms can just be replaced to allow for more efficiency...he obviously hasn't taken chemistry or heard of cell division before. There are enough challenges making a seemingly simple device such as a bionic eye...essentially all you are doing is sending signals to the brain that would've come from the organic eye. But now you want to take data such as crap off the internet and make it readable to the brain...? Sounds to me like people are trying to rewire themselves, and I don't think that will ever be reasonably achieved. There also exists the very real problem of your brain simple ignoring the incoming signals from the implanted chip (see neuroplasticity). This isn't even considering the thermodynamic efficiency of such "augmentations" and the implications of having an overheating piece of silicone in your head (especially if you are going for the even more unrealistic goal of always being connected to the internet).

    Warning: digression ahead

    Alas, we are humans after all, and we always crave what we don't have. Only until we see the negative implications of technology do we steer clear of it. Example: early 1900's when radioactive decay was discovered, people thought it would forever change the energy problem. There was lots of excitement about the prospects of nuclear energy. Now? People are scared of nuclear energy even though it's incredibly efficient. No one wants a nuke plant near them, and the media never shows the benefits of it.

    Yeah, a mech arm sounds cool, but do you think the people who are actually missing limbs are jumping in their seats waiting for these superhuman augs? If you ask me, I don't think so. Unless someone figures out how to make an affordable arm that's lightweight, has all the nerves a regular arm has, and provides a meaningful functionality that isn't super-strength, no one in their right mind is ever going to cut off their own arm. Let's face it, exoskeleton suits are a hundred times more practical, and the research for them is already miles ahead of Deus Ex-style limbs. Exo-suits allow you to do everything mech-limbs do (and most likely better too), and they let you keep your own skin. I think in the future we'll see exo-suits in fire departments and loading docks much like we see other motorized equipment. Of course, DARPA and the DoD is throwing money at these exo-suit research groups because they want something that can aid in combat, and I'm sure these suits will be sleek instead of the hulking ones that are being made today. There will not be a need for these "h+" limbs other than fixing people who have been injured.

  6. #781
    The human brain is the most complex thing known to man (not including the universe itself I suppose), but there is contemporary tech now that interacts with the brain directly, if I am not mistaken. But yeah, to enhance the functionality of the brain with implants...probably not in our lifetime.

    Anyway, good post overall.

  7. #782
    Absolutely no reason we couldn't have images beamed straight into our brains within our lifetimes. That's like 20 year tech at this point. We can already bypass the eyes and help blind people see shapes that are in front of them.
    Speed up the accelerating returns, 'cause carbon doesn’t work, I want to evolve and operate at terahertz.

  8. #783
    Originally Posted by CyberP
    The human brain is the most complex thing known to man (not including the universe itself I suppose), but there is contemporary tech now that interacts with the brain directly, if I am not mistaken. But yeah, to enhance the functionality of the brain with implants...probably not in our lifetime.

    Anyway, good post overall.
    Originally Posted by Shralla
    Absolutely no reason we couldn't have images beamed straight into our brains within our lifetimes. That's like 20 year tech at this point. We can already bypass the eyes and help blind people see shapes that are in front of them.
    You are both correct. But the thing to keep in mind is that the tech you mention merely interacts with the 'pieces', if you will, that are already there. Take the example of the eye again...our brain already has receptors used for image processing so all the tech is doing is using these. Yes, I agree it is possible to beam images into these receptors so you can see them but at that point, why not just use your phone...something easier to control, less invasive, and more energy efficient? The world is driven by money, and companies pouring billions of dollars into something that would most certainly create more problems than it would solve isn't feasible. However from what I gather in all these pseudo-science articles, people are envisioning having data processed from the internet and directly uploaded to the brain.

    Don't get me wrong, I definitely believe in implants that can change moods, stimulate paralyzed parts of the body, etc. But I think the problem lies in the idea that one can interface with the brain and make it do something that's not natural. I think the common analogy of a brain to an electrical circuit misguides people; there are no information 'bits' being exchanged or stored like a computer. Memories (and information in general) are just pulses of electricity between neurons, and it's the pathway of the transmission that constitutes the memory or instruction -- of course there are also neurotransmitters but I don't need to bring that up to explain why interfacing with the brain will never happen. I see no way how someone can reroute the billions of neurons to a microchip (this is the first of the problems, really) while also maintaining the necessary connections already established in the human.

    TL;DR? Essentially, when scientists look at the brain, they see over 100 billion neurons criss crossed in every direction with little clue which ones belong to what bodily functions or memories. Just figuring out a way to hook up these neurons to the silicone board without making the patient a vegetable will certainly earn someone the Nobel Prize. Then, after that impossible task, you have to figure out how to make the brain not block off the microchip and reroute the neuron transmissions somewhere else...a very real problem. Just to give you the scope of neuroplasticity, some woman in China lived 24 years without her cerebellum!

  9. #784
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    Latest EM tweets:

    This is the DARPA-funded Deka arm, which allows near-natural control mechanisms.
    https://twitter.com/eidosmontreal/st...85589952618497
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  10. #785
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    Meet Neil Harbisson, the world's first legally-recognised cyborg.
    The story of Neil Harbisson is one for the ages. Born with a rare vision disorder called achromatopsia, this British-born, Barcelona resident saw the world only in black and white.

    That was until 2003, when he collaborated with Adam Montandon, Associate Professor of Innovation at Denmark's Erhvervsakademiet Lillebælt institute. Together, they created a revolutionary device called the 'eyeborg'. Fixed on the wearer's head, the eyeborg converts light waves (colour) into sound waves. This effectively gives one the ability to hear colour.

    He talks to Roshni Nair about the untapped potential of cybernetics and the need to make technology more intrinsic.

    http://www.dnaindia.com/scitech/inte...to-art-2025239
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  11. #786
    Originally Posted by Adrian Shephard
    I don't think it's even possible..... it can be considered impossible at least in our lifetime....I don't think that will ever be reasonably achieved......If you ask me, I don't think so.....
    Your effort to remain what you are is what limits you.

  12. #787
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    Introducing Daniel Estulin’s book "TransEvolution: The Age of Human Deconstruction"

    His latest book suggests that the depth of progress and technological development is such that people in the very near future may no longer be fully human. He asks: Is humanity in danger because of this domination of science and technology?

    In the following interview with New Dawn magazine, Mr Estulin discusses the rise of transhumanism, the ‘Age of Transition’, post-humanity, synthetic biology, cybernetic immortality, new technologies of control, and the reasons why the global elite are interested in population control.
    Read full article HERE
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  13. #788
    Neat find Vik. That interview painted a more dystopian present and future than anything else I've come across. What bothers me is how disengaged so many people are with this. This, meaning tech and its implications, power & control, social contract etc... My favorite point he brings up is control via food or food control as a weapon. It's so subtle, so taken for granted. Interesting.

    Looking at the site, it's very heavy handed with the rhetoric. Not knocking them. Just pointing out they they are selling their views and not simply an information/research site. Still, I'd like to read his books. It comes off like real life deus ex conspiracy stuff and I love that.
    Your effort to remain what you are is what limits you.

  14. #789
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    Latest H+ article doing the rounds:
    Meet the Transhumanist Party: 'Want to live forever? Vote for me'

    Jamie Bartlett meets Zoltan Istvan, the man behind a political movement in America that wants to make us all more than human.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technolog...te-for-me.html
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  15. #790
    Some relevant and interesting developments:

    http://www.ted.com/talks/hugh_herr_t...limb_and_dance

    http://www.ted.com/talks/miguel_nico..._how_we_did_it

    There will be a big and mighty clash between people that choose to have cybernetics installed and regular people and religious people in particular.

    I am all for cybernetics as I see my body of flesh and bones as nothing more than a device to carry my head around.
    But in the coming few years we will have to answer a number of questions on what it means to be human.

    What defines us as a human?
    Does replacing your arm with a prosthetic make you less human?
    How about if you where to replace your entire body with exception of your mind?

    In my opinion our humanity is defined by our consciousness and not one physical aspect.
    In the end the human body really isn't that different from a robotic one, our current bodies work pretty much the same, hell we even work on electricity just like any electronic device. One would almost think our bodies where designed with cybernetics in mind.

    What makes us human? In my opinion: Individual thoughts, memories, a sense of self and a sense of destiny and curiosity. Ohh and the way one is seen and treated by its surrounding is an important factor to. Even a full flesh regular human being can be convinced he or she is not human if it's repeated enough from early age.

  16. #791
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    Agreed.
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  17. #792
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    Latest news:

    Surgeon Plans First Human Head Transplant
    Sergio Canavero claims recipients would be able to speak using the same voice and could be walking within a year.
    http://news.sky.com/story/1434435/su...ead-transplant
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  18. #793
    That's really more of a body transplant, isn't it? Since the body is the donor item, and you are your head.

  19. #794
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    I need to get my head around this one....


























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