Thread: What comics/cartoons have you read/seen lately?

What comics/cartoons have you read/seen lately?

  1. #876
    I feel pretty similarly. Man in the Pit, Get Mystique and A Mile in my Moccosins were my favourite stories. Aside from the insane asylum arc I felt that the Weapon X stuff was a step down.
    "Sleep? That bed is a coffin and those are winding sheets. I do not sleep I die." - Captain Ahab

  2. #877
    When is Batman #3 coming?
    "Did you believe you could change me, the way I've changed you?"
    "I already did."

  3. #878
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    Originally Posted by Old_BenKenobi
    I feel pretty similarly. Man in the Pit, Get Mystique and A Mile in my Moccosins were my favourite stories. Aside from the insane asylum arc I felt that the Weapon X stuff was a step down.
    The Terminator arc was just so-so really, the 2nd Omnibus pays tribute/rips off from "Oldboy" which is one of the coolest revenge stories out there, but yeah i think the Deathlok stuff just dragged on abit too much.



    Flashpoint by Geoff Johns & Andy Kubert


    The book stars Barry Allen, the man who works as a police officer and also has a double life as the fastest man alive, the Flash. Writer Geoff Johns joins Andy Kubert to tell an event story focusing on the Flash and Batman teaming up very old school fashioned, the Brave and the Bold style.

    The whole time stream has been changed and once heroes are now either dead, anti-heroes or villains, while villains still remain villainous but are worse than ever, the world is on the brink of war between Aquaman’s Atlantean forces against Wonder Woman’s Amazon warriors having destroyed half of Europe. The Justice League doesn’t exist, no one has heard of a man named Superman and Batman has been a vigilante far longer than usual, and also happens to be a man with close to no hope, and his hands full of blood.

    That’s the basic premise, the history has been changed and Flash’s memories are changing in time, so he and the detective Batman have to resolve the mess before it’s too late and the world’s going to hell, it’s a very basic premise, having a fun team-up between the good cop and the rough detective, and it really works well enough to see both Flash and Batman team up like this, there is also Cyborg, Element Woman and a few more surprises along the adventure.
    Andy Kubert’s story telling deserves all the praise it can, because the book is filled with panels that focus on the emotional aspect of characters, plenty of silent moments and important dialogue points that really come off as very character and emotion driven, and you can’t accomplish this with writing alone, you need good art, and what we get is amazing art. The characters, their unique designs in this counterpoint world and the splash pages are all stunning that contain a lot of detail, this is a great book by its’ art alone.

    The extras in the book contain character sketches with insight info alongside some sketches of splash pages, variant covers from different artists, but sadly the World of Flashpoint map splash page was very awfully adjusted to the book and comes off very weak in its’ middle section.

    Rating: 100/100 – It’s a very emotional driven story about a man fixing a huge mess and going thru a variety of pain to make it all work, alongside receiving help from another man who for years has had no hope in his life, but finds light and is utterly dedicated to accomplish his dreams of a better world. The setting is intriguing, the artwork is awe-inspiring and the dialogue is good. If you’re interested or want to become interested in the Flash alongside (or only) wanting to read another Elseworld tale with a very Clint Eastwood Dirty Harry type Batman, this is a good treat for you.

  4. #879
    This was actually my first introduction to Deathlok and my first reaction was... what a horrifying existence. Of course, body horror like gets me the worst (Cronenberg's Fly is my Kryptonite).
    "Sleep? That bed is a coffin and those are winding sheets. I do not sleep I die." - Captain Ahab

  5. #880


    The Punisher Max Volume 4 oversized hardcover.

    Whats not to love? Besides glued binding, that is. This book collects the 7th and 8th story arcs in Garth Ennis' 60 issue run on The Punisher MAX. Neither of these arcs are my favourite of the series (those would be Mother Russia and The Slavers) but both are still kickass. As far as length goes, the two arcs add up to 13 issues which is pretty solid. Its probably as high as I'd be willing to go with a glue-bound book so definitely good value (if you buy it at cover price like my lucky ass was able to ). The first story is Man of Stone, a story set mostly in Afghanistan. Its fairly deep, dealing with both existing continuity. O'Brien, Rawlins and the fat Russian General from the Mother Russia arc (whos name I can't spell but this arc gives him the nickname Man of Stone so hes MOS now). These returning characters set up a bit of continuity lockout as you'd have to have read a few previous arcs to fully understand whats going on, like why Mos is so pissed at Frank and what the deal is between Frank and O'Brien. I guess you can piece it together and get the jist of it but still, in a series thats not too heavy on the continuity this is one of the heavier arcs. The other depth comes from the fact that it deals with the Soviet war in Afghanistan in the 80s, where MOS got his nickname. Afghanistan, portrayed mostly through its deserts, is shown to be a death trap and a perpetual warzone with its history ever looming on the story. The basic plot is Rawlins (who lost an eye to Frank a few arcs back and is pissed) gets back in cahoots with MOS as they both want to take down The Punisher. Using Rawlins' ex-wife O'Brien and MOS as bait they lure Castle to Afghanistan and work to take him down. The story is actually fairly light on action, dealing mostly with character development. Castle and O'Brien's previously existing feelings (though Castle would never acknowledge them) are developed during their time in the desert while we get new insight into the backgrounds of Rawlins and MOS as they work in their uneasy alliance (MOS straight up tells Rawlins that he has no interest in hiring him as he will inevitably be betrayed and Rawlins is actually hung up twice, once to get his balls mutilated and once over a cliff). As these developments come to a head the climax kicks in and its a good one with some really awesome asskicking at the hands of Castle. I won't give it away but the very last scene is one of my favourites in the whole series. It doesn't have the gut wrenching power of The Slavers, the political flair of Mother Russia or the anti-emotional emotion of Up is Down, Black is White but its a strong arc. I give it 4/5.

    The second arc is Widowmaker. This is another continuity heavy arc, as it revolves around wife widows conspiring to kill Castle. All five women had their gangster husbands murdered by the Punisher and most of them are from previous arcs (including the very first one, which opened with Castle absolutely slaughtering fathers, sons and cousins from several families). Its a rare glimpse into the other side of Castle's work. The people he murders have loved ones and hes causing them emotional pain. One moment has a widow recollecting the bloodbath from issue one and recalling how she lost all of the men in her family including her two sons while holding back the children and trying to stay inconspicuous. It makes Castle come off as an emotionless force of nature (which he is) and makes us reconsider our reactions to the scene that defined the series. Its great writing. There are a few more crinkles to the story. Theres a disfigured woman whos plotting to kill the five widows for very personal reasons as well as a cop who is under heat for disobeying orders and killing a teenaged school shooter. These two characters feel like they're on the same path to becoming The Punisher but eventually realize that they just can't be. "You want to be me?" Frank Castle is one of a kind, hes traded his humanity for violence and hes ok with that. By the end of the story we're closer to understanding him and understanding what kind of a monster he is. 4/5

    As far as presentation goes, the book is pretty great. The art is simply fantastic. Its gorgeous to look at and it reads clearly. Its realistic and grim, few hints of cartoon here. The oversized format is just the icing on the cake. Its the way to go for art like this. The dustjacker is nice but I think the actual cover is much sexier. Black imitation leather with red foil hotstamping on the cover and spine give the book a sharp and clean look. The endpages and headbands are also red. This is a mean looking book. The only downside is the glued binding, which prevents the book from laying flat like a sewn bound book does (my Wolverine omnibus opens much flatter despite being more than twice as thick). This can make it a bit of a pain to read. There is a small smattering of bonus material, just some sketches and pencils. Its interesting to see how little detail Leandro Fernandez puts in his pencils. They build the scene but its the inks and colours that define the atmosphere and IMO thats how it should be. Overall the bonuses are nice and what you'd expect from a book this size. The packaging gets 4/5 It'd get a five if it was sewn.

    Overall the book is a 4/5 across the board. Not the greatest material from the run but its still mighty strong. I prefer the content from the first three OHCs though.
    "Sleep? That bed is a coffin and those are winding sheets. I do not sleep I die." - Captain Ahab

  6. #881
    Bought the first Marvel Masterworks for Spiderman and American Vampire Vol. 1. Will read soon!
    "Did you believe you could change me, the way I've changed you?"
    "I already did."

  7. #882
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    Good review on the Punisher. I saw a store that had Punisher OHC, but paying the full price, greh! I think i'll wait for the inevitable (lol i'm optimistic) Ultimate Collections or something. Luckily Libraries always seem to have the more "mature" comics around.

    Batman: Noël

    (click image to enlarge)
    The co-creator of 2008 hot selling original graphical novel Joker, artist and writer Lee Bermejo tells his own Batman story, which is based off Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

    Like the classic story itself, the story follows Scrooge’s (Batman) ethical, ideological and emotional transformation from the gruesome bitter pessimistic vigilante to a more happier, optimistic man thru the visit of the Ghost of Christmas Past (Robin), Present (Superman) and the possible future (Joker).

    What I love about the book’s art is that this time it’s all Lee Bermejo himself, not that I had any issues with the Joker having a 2 inkers, some scenes being rougher and others being very beautifully illustrated, but this time it’s all 100% Lee Bermejo and the art is just flawless to look at. Fans of Bermejo’s art and visual interpretation of characters are gifted with not only Darwyn Cooke’s design of Catwoman, but a nice treat of her famous purple & green 1960s design, the yellow oval on Batman’s chest makes an appearance, the 60s Batmobile, Penguin and even the laughing daredevil Robin the Boy Wonder makes an appearance.

    I can’t stop praising how stunning this book looks, and ultimately the credit cannot be solely given to Lee Bermejo, but the story as a whole is the work of Bermejo, the colorist Barbara Ciardo brings the characters and the city to live from the light radiating Superman to the utterly creepy Joker, while Todd Klein’s lettering brings the narration to life and gives it character, as the narration is done in a very personal story, like a bed time story told by a father to son.

    Ultimately there isn’t much to talk about the story, since it is an adaptation with a Bat flavor for a Christmas classic, I will say this, that Batman in this book is incredibly dark, the guy has lost all hope and literally barely even cares about saving people or protecting people from traumas, all he wants is to ensure people are too scared to do crime and catch criminals, this man changes obviously as Scrooge does, but I do feel the “3rd Act” of the story following the last ghost’s visit to the conclusion may come a bit too swiftly, perhaps I would have wanted the very last pages extended with more silent moments and focus to the characters, but it does offer a very happy ending, and despite being dark, I would recommend this for younger Batman fans as a Christmas gift, as long as they are at least teen agers in my opinion.

    Rating: 80/100
    – Solid adaptation of a classic story with Batman characters, a lot of heart and passion from the creative team to tell a story about a person who doesn’t believe in hope or being able to change to becoming that very person who has hope and believes people can change to the better.

  8. #883
    Well if it was the fourth one then paying full price is no bad deal.

    And I think a set of omnis is more likely for this series. Its just begging for it. Ultimate Collections are more likely for the Marvel Knights series which isn't in print in any form.
    "Sleep? That bed is a coffin and those are winding sheets. I do not sleep I die." - Captain Ahab

  9. #884
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    Captain America by Jack Kirby Omnibus


    Who’s strong & brave, here to save the American way? The Star Spangled Man of course! This omnibus collects Jack “the King” Kirby’s run on Captain America & the Falcon from 1976, as Kirby was one of the very creators of the character, this almost feels like an happy family reunion where the creator takes his character to whole new adventures, and boy is this book filled with over the top, creative, bizarre and at times just flat out insane ideas.

    The book follows Captain America & Falcon as SHIELD agents, who play a heavy part in the book, but for some reason you don’t see Nick Fury at all in this book, but simply referenced. Sharon Carter, the love interest of Captain America plays a very small role as well on the book and it’s sadly also as a rather distressed damsel, but luckily towards the end of the book we see her return as a proper SHIELD agent and kick some butt!

    Story structure wise, there is a sense of continuity within standalone issues, 2-3 issue arcs, but there isn’t any long endgame plan here, people have to remember this was written in the 70s, and thus the way the panels, dialogue, stories and pretty much everything can be seen a bit dated, I felt this wasn’t Jack Kirby’s strongest work when it comes to the dialogue: Falcon talks like some generic happy-go black guy, the exclamation marks are thrown around to imply dramatic effect and at times it feels like all seniors talk the same referring Cap as “Son” and yeah sometimes it just feels there is no unique voices outside the two protagonists, Cap & Falcon.

    Now the best part is obviously the ideas Kirby encompasses to his work, and the villains in this book, while not really classic Captain America villains excluding the Red Skull, Arnim Zola (1st appearance!) alongside Magneto and the Brotherhood of Mutants making an appearance, the villains here are rather unknown, but they carry the perfect theme against the Sentinel of Liberty.

    The 1st major villain in the book is the Elite, ruled by William Taurey. William’s family comes off of descendants who fought with the English army during the Revolutionary War, but the Taurey family lost to Steve Rogers’ descendent, so not only do we have this superiority vs. nobleness theme, we also have a family rivalry going on. What make the Elite so intriguing is the weapons they’ve device, which are the Mad-Bombs. What are Mad-Bombs? Why bombs that don’t explode! Instead they send brainwave signals that cause total chaos, people become feral mindless beings that just want to maim and destroy everything and everyone, and it’s up to Captain America, Falcon and SHIELD to stop the Mad-Bomb “Big Daddy” from destroying the United States of America!

    Other villains in the book include a whole different wave of Alien beings, corrupt Humans who love slavery and torture, the introduction to Arnim Zola shows his bio-chemistry as he has created an whole army of shape shifting beings that he has enslaved, and of course we even have the Red Skull appear as he and Zola wish to resurrect Adolf Hitler and mock America by cutting Steve’s face off. I love the thematic value these villains have. Captain America is everything that’s good about the people: nobility, compassion, trust, the truth, justice, helping others and so forth, and these people are about destroying the individual’s rights, slavery, corruption and just creating chaos and tyranny. It works wonders and can be easily compared with something more mainstream acknowledged such as Batman’s Order vs. Joker’s chaos.

    Rating: 80/100 – It’s definitely a powerful art book showcasing Jack Kirby at his finest, I loved how over the top the book is and I barely even scratched the surface with that, you got alien invaders, time travel with adventures such as Captain America and Benjamin Franklin hanging out, you got the Mad-Bombs and Adolf Hitler’s brain in a robot, it’s really hilariously awesome stuff, but I really do feel like the dialogue and narration really do bring down the quality a lot, it just makes the pace slower and a bit dull at times, so I’ll definitely say this is for the Silver Age and Jack Kirby fans, fans of Captain America could check this out to see a rather old school take on the character.
    Thoughts & Rambles: Thor by Kieron Gillen Ultimate Collection

    There needs to be said a little bit of backstory before recommending this book to anyone. Kieron Gillen was tasked to finish the story begun by J. Michael Straczynski (JMS), and then his following issues are Tie-ins to an Brian Michael Bendis event titled “Siege” where Asgard is sieged.

    I felt Gillen did a good job with this book, granted for brand new Thor fans it might be best to read JMS run first, the book does open with a 1 page summary and gives information on minor characters such as Bill & Kelda, alongside how Dr. Doom is connected to all of this, but it still makes one ponder if they could have given them some backstory. The Doom arc is wonderful showcasing the treacherous Doom having his own Destroyer battle armor, Billy Tan’s penciling on the fight scene is fantastic and seeing Doom with an army of mind warped Asgardian humanoid monsters was truly like something from a horror movie.

    The Siege parts, is rather disappointingly constructed due to being an tie-in, you don’t really know who is attacking outside the US government, you know Norman (Green Goblin) is running the show, but wouldn’t a new fan ask how that even happened in the 1st place? It shows the start of the siege, then jumps to the middle of it and then again just jumps to the aftermath, as all the “Main” events happened in the “Main” Siege book. I really enjoyed the Siege segments, because they don’t really focus on Thor, but on heroes such as Balder the Brave, Tyr the God of War, Heimdall, Fandrall, even Hela and Mephisto have important roles during the end of the book.

    While this is a Thor book, and he does appear in majority of the issues, I’d still claim the main star of the book is none other than his brother, Loki. Loki’s tricks, lies, manipulations and schemes carry the whole book from start to end. While he doesn’t appear at all issues, even then his presence is felt as everything revolving the heroes is due to Loki’s actions, and that’s what makes me see Loki as star of the book, and with the Siege tie-ins focusing on minor characters, it gives this cool “anthology” like story, as each Siege segment focuses on some Asgardian and how they’re dealing with the war, it was interesting to see the different perspectives and stories, because Gillen gives all Asgardians this great charm and elegance to their dialogue.

    Rating: 88/100
    – While the way the book is construct with the Conclusion to JMS’ story to Siege tie-in issues and then lastly Gillen’s story that grew from these book, I can’t help but to cheer for his writing ability to make it all work, the dialogue is wonderful, as I felt Asgardians have this elegance to them, especially Balder’s dialogue shines here, the book has a good amount of action, Loki’s plotting and scheming and seeing it all unfold alongside Hela and Mephisto being great manipulators as well is a sinisterly sweet. Not to mention the book does plant the seeds for Gillen’s Journey into Mystery which stars none other than Loki!

  10. #885
    I wish that was an OHC instead of an UC.
    "Sleep? That bed is a coffin and those are winding sheets. I do not sleep I die." - Captain Ahab

  11. #886
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    Heh tell me about it. I bet it would really fit nicely next to your Omnibus, but yeah the Softcover collection just couldn't.

    Batman: the Black Mirror review

    This deluxe edition collects Scott Snyder’s (best known for his American Vampire series) 11 issue Detective Comics run, illustrated by the talented artists Jock and Francesco Francavilla. The story in short resolves around Family and the new generation, and how this new generation lingers’ in the shadows of the past generation one way or another.

    The stars of the book are Dick Grayson as Batman, Commissionaire James Gordon, Barbara Gordon aka the Oracle and there is this nice tight family theme going on between all 3 characters, after all Dick Grayson has known James Gordon since his Robin days, and did date the once-Batgirl Barbara. Now new readers might be shunned by the idea that Bruce Wayne isn’t starring this book or that they need to know some mass amount of previous continuity to catch up and appreciate the story to the fullest, well fear not, because this is a very self-contained book, with a short introduction to the Gotham world, so it isn’t any different from any other Batman book that might provide small details such as that Bruce Wayne and Batman are the one and the same.

    The book contains 3 stories, the main story stretching from start to end which is the return of James Gordon junior, the son of Jim Gordon whom fans have only read about previously in Frank Miller’s Batman: Year One, fans of Year One will also probably get a kick out of Detective Flass reference that’s in the story. The 1st story connects nicely how Gotham’s history with its’ freak show has molded into Gotham’s society as Dick is the today’s generation Batman, but you got crooks with all random devices from past villains, you got Mobsters with Umbrella guns, Poison Ivy poisons, Man-Bat serums, Joker Toxin, you name it. So much damage has happened around Gotham alongside its’ good that some Gotham socialites have begun worshipping this very evil to a lunatic level.

    The next story has Snyder reinvent the classic Batman villain Tiger Shark, with a complete new design, while keeping the undersea headquarter, now Tiger Shark is more of an smuggler using the undersea pipes, while alongside being a collector of near extinct animals, his new visual design and motive screams of upper class elitism, which nicely reflects to the whole nasty Gotham socialites that we read about. It also reflects again upon the “Old vs. New” with a certain woman unable to escape her father’s shadow, new crime empires rising and so forth.

    The last arc is the big conclusion with the Batman family and Gordon family resolving a family crisis with none other than the Prince of Crime himself making his appearance, whoever designed Joker’s lettering type deserves credit and Snyder’s dialogue for all characters, especially Joker is spot on.

    The dual team of artists really works well, despite the art styles being different, both deliver excellent action scenery, but I feel Jock is the man who did the dirty city skyscraper with Dick diving in, with Francesco he gives a lot of emotional power with his characters’ faces and the beautiful painted feel to it all. Fans of Batman the Animated Series will also likely get a nice kick out of the red sky that is seen from time to time, both artists give this great dirty feel to Gotham City.

    That’s one thing about Gotham and this whole story however, it’s very dark. The conclusion to the story is also rather dark, it’s a very post-9/11 kind of a trope where the world is so dark and there is only the tiniest fragment of hope and light alive, it’s the good guys vs. the evil in Gotham, but if Gotham truly was this huge pile of evil, why would anyone live there to begin with? What is the point, if it really is just sewer pipes and corpses with so much darkness and so little light? This really goes to show how does the individual reader interprets his/her Gotham city in the Batman universe.

    The extras in the book include unused covers, cover sketches, character designs and best of all, an actual script pages from the 1st draft of a particular issue. I always love getting some insight and get to the mind of the writers, seeing how much visual imagination they must empower to their scripts to have the artist make it come alive, it’s an exciting process to learn.

    Rating: 100/100 – While my minor nitpicks are the dark scum with seemingly no hope in Gotham, with just tiny fragments of course, it doesn’t hurt my enjoyment or scoring to the degree to not give it a perfect score. The characters are well rounded and fleshed out, the dialogue is great, you get some “classic Snyder” family trope inner monologue, the villains are unique and inspiring, and the whole book carries this element of mystery with hidden clues, which is what a “Detective Comics” title should always have. Like I said, it’s self-contained, well written and drawn, it’s a great Batman comic book for casuals and hardcore Batman fans alike.

  12. #887
    The other night I watched 2004's The Punisher, starring Thomas Jane.

    It was a difficult movie to watch from an objective viewpoint because the Punisher is easily one of my favourite comic book characters (always feels good to see someone doing what needs to be done) and right now I'm in the middle of a big Punisher kick, which is why I watched the movie in the first place. Its even more difficult to talk about and review because I can't say "The movie sucks because its in Tampa!" like my inner fanboy tells me to. All I can really do is talk about the structure of the movie, its main character and its tone.

    But before I get to all of that I want to go over the smaller stuff. I can say without a shadow of a doubt that Thomas Jane as Frank Castle is casting comic book fans dream about. Hes just pitch perfect as Castle and I'd put him in the same crowd as RDJ's Tony Stark, Mickey Rourke's Marv and Christopher Reeve's Superman. Just perfect.

    I'm also a fan of the action in the movie, its really well done and the climax in particular reminded me of First Blood, in that its actually a very stealthy action scene. And Thomas Jane is a very credible action hero, he sells it really well.

    What really surprised me was the quality of the score. I hadn't thought about what the score would be like, the music was just one of those things I didn't think about. But when the movie started and a really sad horn started playing I was stunned, I thought it was a perfect fit. Give it a listen..

    Now onto the bulk of my review. First up is the story. The basic plot is Frank Castle, a cop in Tampa, retires after making a bust which doesn't go so well. One of the criminals killed is the son of Howard Saint, a mid-level mafioso who is understandably pissed. He wants to take Castle out but his wife demands they take out his family as well. Castle is at a family reunion in Puerto Rico, which is really convenient for Saint's men. They try to kill Castle but he survives and immediately decides to take up vengeance. He goes back to Tampa, gets a crapload of military gear out of storage and sets up shop in a rundown tenement. From here he starts moving in against Saint's organization. After convincing one of Saint's men to join up with him he gathers some intel. He learns that Saint's capo is a closeted homosexual and that Saint's wife goes out to the movies once a week. Both characters stick to a strict schedule, which makes it easy for Frank to manipulate them. He summons the capo to a hotel under the threat of blackmail (Frank has photos of him with another man) and he steals the wife's car and illegally parks it at the hotel so she gets a ticket (using a neat trick involving a fake fire hydrant to keep her original parking space open). Frank also puts the pressure on Saint's business by striking his employees and shipments of money (he launders money for more important men, who are pissed when 50 million dollars goes missing). It all boils down to a climax where after letting Saint's paranoia and jealously drive him to kill his capo and his wife Frank goes into Saint's nightclub and slaughters everyone, including Saint. With his vengeance complete he contemplates suicide but the memory of his wife motivates him to live and punish evildoers.

    Added wrinkles to the story are the inclusion of Joan, Mr Bumpo and Spacker Dave, Frank's neighbours from Welcome Back, Frank by Garth Ennis. They try to get close to him and befriend them but hes too cold emotionally to truly bond like a normal person, though they do touch his heart by the end. These characters are mainly to add some flavour to a dry story, a would-be love interest for Frank through Joan and comic relief through Bumpo and Dave. I have a problem with their inclusion, and it leads me to ultimately my biggest issue with the movie.

    Its a bleak drama that tries to shoehorn in comic-relief characters. In WBF Spacker Dave and Mr Bumpo were comic relief characters. They were funny because they were misfits and it was funny to see such weird but innocent people rubbing shoulders with Frank Castle. It worked in WBF because it was a comedy. It had emotional weight and heart but it was still a comedy. The movie, however, is a drama and a particularly grim one. Mr Bumpo and Spacker Dave feel so hugely out of place it doesn't make much sense to have them there at all, aside from a gratuitous torture scene involving Dave's piercings. I also have serious issues regarding the death of Howard Saint. Frank shoots him in the belly, then ties his leg to the bumper of a car. He sets the car in neutral, slaps a bomb on it and sends it rolling into a parking lot. He hits a detonator and cars start blowing up. John Travolta is being dragged around while his leg is on fire and he is screaming. Then all the cars blow up and we switch to an aerial shot and we see that the explosion has made a big Punisher skull. This is goofy. I can buy this ending if they're trying to be funny by giving this character the most over the top flashy death possible, but no, they're trying to be serious. Do you know how I would have done it? I would have had Frank shoot Saint in the belly, then pour gas on him and light him on fire. Because thats what Frank would have done. But this isn't the biggest WTF element of the movie. No, that would be The Russian. History lesson young folks: The Russian is a character with a few notable characteristics. Hes freakishly strong, hes incredibly upbeat and talkative at all times and he loves superheroes. He is stimutaneously a great gag and a satisfying climax to a story. In Welcome Back, Frank, anyway. In this movie he never says a word, killing the majority of his derived humour. But like I said, its a drama.... which doesn't explain him wearing the same dumbass outfit he wore in the comic! And he still beats the crap out of Frank Castle as a joke, set to classical music and interspersed with Mr Bumpo lipsyncing and dancing. How the hell can you have this in the same movie where a Grandma gets shot down and a woman and her son get run over by a truck? Why not recast The Russian as a serious mercenary and make the fight a legitimate dramatic moment? I mean, they made Joan an ex-junkie with an abusive ex-boyfriend... Also, the Russian is introduced with zero buildup. We hear Saint say "Bring in the Russian" and then a few scenes later he shows up, kicks some ass then dies. Then we never hear of him again.

    The next two issues I have with the movie are intertwined: The structure of the movie and the treatment of the main character. For the first 30 minutes it works pretty well. We get to know Castle and his family, we learn that his job has led to some stress for his young son but they're moving to England to be safe but before that they're going to a family reunion. We learn that Howard Saint's son was killed by Frank Castle and that he and his wife are out for revenge. The two meet in the middle and the first act climaxes with the big shootout and Frank's decision to seek vengeance. I found this to be the setup to a good movie and I was actually surprised, I expected the movie to be worse. But the second act just left me cold. Frank spends a lot of time being introspective and stoicy, as Frank Castle tends to be. The issue I have is that in the comics we get Frank's inner monologue constantly. Narration ranks at Casino on the Scorcese scale. But we don't get that in this movie when really we need it most. Our insight into Frank Castle's mindset dies with his family and because of that his transition into vengeful vigilante feels jarring. What doesn't help is for the first 20 minutes Frank is a perfectly well-adjusted man who was good at his job but was happy to leave the life behind. Its very hard to believe that this guy is capable of becomign a super badass vigilante just like that. Ennis made a point to show that Frank's life was filled with violence and that in Vietnam he developed a lust for combat. This is genius, as it makes his transition into The Punisher so much more believable. Hes not just a family man who snaps and starts killing people, hes a soldier who is motivated to go back to battle. Is this made evident in the movie? No. So what we have is a character whos behaviour changes drastically partway through the movie and we get almost no insight into what hes thinking or how hes feeling outside of just plain ol' anger. This makes the entire second act grind to a halt and even with some action beats thrown in its pretty boring. The movie picks up again when the third act starts and his plan enters its final stages but that second act just drags and drags.

    A fourth point I want to bring up is John Travolta. He is terrible in this movie. It actually makes the scenes with his character (and there are a lot of them) hard to watch and definitely affects the overall enjoyability of the movie.

    What else do I have to say?

    Some small stuff:

    Despite what you might think, this movie is not about The Punisher. Its about Frank Castle's quest for vengeance. The Punisher is not out for vengeance, he kills criminals because he hates them. Thats all there is to it. In this movie Frank does not go against anyone who isn't connected to Howard Saint. His only priority is bringing that man down, not punishing wrondoers. Basically, imagine if Batman Begins ended with Bruce killing Joe Chill without ever actually becoming Batman.

    I don't know how I feel about the Punisher shirt being a present from his son thats supposed to be some voodoo symbol to ward off evil but theres a great shot where he finds the shirt after the masscare and lifts it up in front of his face. As he lifts it he is clearly sad and broken. As he lowers it he is cold and determined. We get to see Castle go into Punisher mode through visuals alone.

    Frank's military service was barely referenced. Considering its such a huge part of his character that kind of stuck out as weird.

    Overall its a very flawed movie. It has its upsides but they're equally negated by its downsides. I am a fan of revenge movies in general and this movie has a very 1970s feel (it almost looks like a Don Segel movie) so theres some personal bias in there but I'm also a big Punisher fan and what they changed annoys me a lot.

    I give it 5/10. RIght down the middle.

    Now its time for the comic fan to *.

    *ahem*

    Tampa Bay?



    Frank is a cop?



    Frank was in the Gulf War instead of Vietnam?



    The death of his family was an assassination?



    Joan the Mouse is an ex-junkie?



    The Russian doesn't speak?



    His name is Francis Castle?

    "Sleep? That bed is a coffin and those are winding sheets. I do not sleep I die." - Captain Ahab

  13. #888
    I'm so glad to see this thread is still alive after all this time. Really, really wonderful.

    Unfortunately I'm not financially gifted enough to be able to regularly buy comics, so my Christmas money was spent on my latest binge of comic-buying after a many good months. They're all arriving in the mail, and I think the first few will arrive within the next few days. If anyone has read any of these, I'd appreciate some feedback without spoilers please, just because I'm curious how they are (I'm sure I will enjoy them though).

    Batman: Absolution - An extremist deals substantial damage to Bruce Wayne's company with an explosion, killing several of his employees and friends in the progress. Batman relentlessly hunts her down, but time and again she escapes capture, moving from hideout to hideout. Ten years later, he finally finds her, only to discover she has turned her life around in a complete moral 180, now swearing off violence and doing her part to help feed and provide for as many people as she can manage, and yet, Batman cannot forgive her.

    Batman: The Cult - Deacon Blackfire takes hold of Gotham City with his cult. Also includes Jason Todd as Robin.

    Batman: Night Cries - Batman attempts to chase down yet another serial killer who witnesses describe as being Batman himself, but with a twist; the murderer targets only those who are guilty of some form of child abuse. Batman is thrust into a tragically heartbreaking world of crime that is hard to prove and hard to fight due to being mostly behind closed doors, while Jim Gordon has to come to terms with his own abusive childhood in order to resolve how it has impacted his marriage and parenthood.

    Batman: The Ultimate Evil (novel, although there is a comic version I eventually want to get) - Discovering that his mother, Martha Wayne, was once a social worker who had legally pursued and fought against a child pornography ring, Batman embarks on a quest to fight a criminal tourist system responsible for sex crimes against children from Gotham all the way to Udon Khai (an analogue of Thailand) - one upon which he will rain merciless fury and violence.

    Batman/Darkness - A crossover with the Top Cow comic, where Batman encounters Jackie Estacado, a young hitman for the Franchetti Crime Family who has inherited The Darkness, a demonic power that allows him to manifest whatever object he wants as long as he is not in the light.

    Batman: No Man's Land (novel, although there is a comic series I eventually want to get) - An 8.0 earthquake leaves Gotham in a cataclysmic state.

    Batman: Knightfall, Part 1 - The introduction of Bane and his systematic wearing down and defeat of Batman.

    Spider-Man/Daredevil: Unusual Suspects - I haven't been able to find a synopsis, but from what I've seen it apparently appears to be a good story about the two double teaming the Kingpin.

    Spider-Man: Quality Of Life - Martha Connors, wife of The Lizard, is diagnosed with cancer, and the blame falls on the shoulders of an unscrupulous company supposedly working for the good of mankind.

    Wanted - Yes, the Mark Millar graphic novel that was adapted into a movie which apparently seems completely unrelated. Why the heck did they buck the whole supervillain element out of the film?!? It seems terrific! I've only read bits and pieces of it in stores before, but the parts I did find I fell in love with, definitely has little touches of things like Old Man Logan and Kick-Ass in it. I'm sure everyone's heard of this by now, but in case you haven't, it's about a white collar wage slave whose boring life is changed for the worst -- or, best? -- once he becomes indoctrinated of a hidden society of supervillains that secretly rule the world.

    Spider-Man: Son Of The Goblin - A collection of stories featuring Harry Osborn becoming the second Green Goblin, working to undo Spider-Man, and Peter Parker's, life.

    Spider-Man vs Wolverine: The two aforementioned superheroes run into each other while both are in Europe tracking down an assassin killing ex-KGB agents, and a misunderstanding leads into combat.

    Spider-Man: Wanted Dead Or Alive (novel) - After Spider-Man is blamed for the accidental shooting of a bystander in the middle of a crime, an anti-superhero mayoral candidate makes his move, secretly being the pawn of a man seeking to establish himself as the leader of New York's criminal underworld.

    Also, not sure if I got to post them yet, but some while ago I got Batman: Anarky and Batman: Broken City, which are both excellent, I'd recommend them to anyone.. For Christmas I received Batman And Philosophy: The Dark Knight Of The Soul, an examination of the Batman series, and from what I've read so far it's incredibly interesting and insightful.

  14. #889
    The Batman Files: Huge. Very. Frigging. Huge.
    Darkhawk: How the hell had I not heard of this guy before?!

  15. #890
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    Has anyone read the Green Lantern Omnibus Vol. 1?

    After watching the Green Lantern movie (which was ehhh), I have a renewed interest in the comics. It seems that this Omnibus contains the first 20 or so issues as well as some other collections. It sounds like a good investment but I wanted the opinion of avid readers before taking the plunge.

    If you all have suggestions for any Green Lantern reading as well, I'm all ears for it.
    PSN: Nemesis296
    XBL/GFWL: HyperN3mesis

  16. #891
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    The upcoming CGI cartoon and the movie heavily burrowed from Geoff Johns Green Lantern, so if anything, your starting place would be to get the Secret Origin trade, which received the movie image cover as it was re-printed. Thats a better starting place.

    Read some Grant Morrison hardcovers today, gladly recommending both:
    Marvel Boy

    Grant Morrison & J.G. Jones team up under Marvel Knights imprint promising mature action, innovative storytelling and showcasing us a brand new badass anti-hero or rather anti-establishment character, Noh-Varr the living weapon! The young Kree foot soldier, who decides the best way to protect the planet he’s now forced to remain on, is to destroy the current establishment and replace it with the supreme Kree society.
    If you’re a fan of sci-fi and especially a fan of the Morrison-type of sci-fi alongside high amount of action, clever dialogue and brilliant characters, this is a big treat for you. Alongside just being a 6 issue long story, it’s nicely paced and tells a full story on the character’s origin and his motivations around Earth, it’s just a major disappointed how badly Marvel ruined this character, because when you get to read this book and see how much of a total boss Noh Varr is, it really makes you want to facepalm on how stupid the character has been turned.

    The book opens with Noh-Varr & his comrades are on their way back to their home planet after countless adventures of different multiverses, microverses across the Omniverse, but a multi-trillionaire human named Midas learns about them and thus forces them to crash land on Earth, killing everyone Noh-Varr cared and knew about inside the ship and thus starting the revenge plot against Midas, what Noh-Varr also does is as mentioned: destroying the establishment to replace it with the Supreme Kree society! You get the craziest fight scenes and adventures you couldn’t had imagined from SHIELD purchasing the Bannermen! Policing the 21th century with the powers of Captain America and Hulk, or how about Hexus! The super sentient corporation that plans to brainwash the entire planet with its marketing schemes until all that is left on the planet is nothingness! These are just a few examples of the kind of high packed adventures Marvel Boy faces.

    Rating: 100/100 – This is everything you want in a Grant Morrison comic and a great comic in general (Is there a difference however? I don’t think so!) regarding the “innovative” storytelling, this book was launched in 2000-2001 so that was 10 years ago, so for me I’ve seen scripts where Morrison pulls the artist to make scenery, panels and panel grids like these before and certainly from J.G. Jones in books such as Wanted and Final Crisis, but hey great art is always great art. It has that photo-realistic feel to it, like it really is part of our world and not some wacky cartoon, the designs are intriguing and the book comes with sketches at the end of it as extras to get behind the scenes look. Overall it’s an action packed sci-fi adventure with not your so usual superhero as the protagonist.
    Fantastic Four: 1234

    Grant Morrison & Jae Lee team up under the Marvel Knights imprint to tell a more mature and darker story of the very 1st Marvel family there is: the Fantastic Four! It’s an interesting short 4 issue story with its usual setting of Dr. Doom wanting to destroy Reed Richards while teaming up with Namor & Mole Man, each issue focusing on a certain FF member from the Thing to lastly Reed Richards himself.

    I knew this was going to be a darker take on the Fantastic Four, but it still took me by surprise and Jae Lee’s dark gritty even to the point of “noir” art came off as a surprise, but it really does work here because this isn’t just about Dr. Doom’s millionth time trying to destroy Reed Richards, but you got Thing’s self petty, Johnny’s boredom with his thrilling celebrity life and Sue Storm’s feelings of being ignored by her husband. So not only we got high sci-fi battle of the minds with Dr. Doom playing chess against Reed Richards, we got the emotional drama going on too as New York is being attack yet again by Dr. Doom bots.

    Without spoiling the context of the last issue, this is an interesting take on Dr. Doom vs. the Fantastic Four, but at the end of its just another Dr. Doom vs. Fantastic Four story if you can catch my drift, but it comes with good dialogue, good art, interesting sci-fi concepts and a pretty darn awesome humiliations towards the bad guys.

    The hardcover collects the Nick Fury one-shot story Grant Morrison did and it’s pretty darn hilarious, showcasing how far and willing Nick Fury can be just to take down 1 villain who isn’t even some level a classic comic book villain, but simply anti-democracy agent.

    Rating: 87/100 – Self-contained Fantastic Four story with an interesting take on a typical story with great dialogue, good art and as an added bonus you get a rather hilariously cool Nick Fury story with (again) great dialogue and decent art.

  17. #892
    Has anyone read Batman: Leviathan Strikes yet?

    I'm not sure I completely understood it. Feel free to use spoiler tags in any explanations. Or not.
    "Did you believe you could change me, the way I've changed you?"
    "I already did."

  18. #893
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    If you're confused, it's probably the latter part. Which is that Batman is drugged with Alzheimer's and is getting the biggest confusions of his life. Classic tools like light, sound, smell are used, identical rooms with the identical thugs laying around and so forth.

    JLA: The Obsidian Age

    The age of heroes must be the greatest time of it all when it began with Superman and continued with the Justice League, but what if there was a Secret Age of heroes that began 3000 years ago & raged through one thousand years of prehistory? What if the Justice League of America consisting of Superman, Wonder Woman, Batman, Green Lantern (Kyle Rayner), Flash (Wally West), Martian Manhunter & Plastic Man we’re send there to battle and actually died? What happens then?


    That is the pitch writer Joe Kelly went with as he proposed the Obsidian Age story to DC and I felt it was the best way to describe the story. The artists joined by Joe Kelly are Doug Mahnke & Tom Nguyen on the past, with Yvel Guichet & Mark Propst illustrating the present timeline. The story is collected in two softcover volumes.


    There is a great deal of central focus towards magic and magicians in the DC Universe, but also one of its greatest civilizations ever known: the Atlantis! Aww yeah, Atlantis and Aquaman get a nice central focus on this time travel adventure. Zatanna & Tempest both play important roles to the story, but the main secondary characters are the new Justice League that Batman chose personally in case the original members would all wither away, these Leaguers are: Green Arrow, Hawkgirl, Etrigan/Jason Blood, Firestorm, Faith, the Atom (Ray Palmer), Major Disaster and their leader; the one and only, Nightwing!


    I love how the story rotates around between the past and the present, between the main Justice League and the new Justice league. It has a lot of time travel madness you’d except from a writer such as Grant Morrison, but receiving it from Joe Kelly is a pleasant surprise. Tons of great superhero moments from a Superman match that takes across the globe, Batman and Wonder Woman romance, Nightwing leading the Justice League, Green Arrow being a horndog Plastic Man being hilarious and one of the most utterly insane awesome Bat-god moments, this book keeps delivering. It all ties down at the end leaving no plot holes whatsoever behind and concludes its story well.


    Rating: 93/100
    - Incredibly well written story that gives readers two Justice League teams in one story that delivers action, thrills and awesome character moments while also world building DC universe with its past and Atlantis. The art is good and very consistent, while some artists make it a bit more cartoonish then others, the action is good, the facial expressions show emotion and everything looks good.

  19. #894
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    Dec 2008
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    If you're confused, it's probably the latter part. Which is that Batman is drugged with Alzheimer's and is getting the biggest confusions of his life. Classic tools like light, sound, smell are used, identical rooms with the identical thugs laying around and so forth.

    JLA: The Obsidian Age

    The age of heroes must be the greatest time of it all when it began with Superman and continued with the Justice League, but what if there was a Secret Age of heroes that began 3000 years ago & raged through one thousand years of prehistory? What if the Justice League of America consisting of Superman, Wonder Woman, Batman, Green Lantern (Kyle Rayner), Flash (Wally West), Martian Manhunter & Plastic Man we’re send there to battle and actually died? What happens then?


    That is the pitch writer Joe Kelly went with as he proposed the Obsidian Age story to DC and I felt it was the best way to describe the story. The artists joined by Joe Kelly are Doug Mahnke & Tom Nguyen on the past, with Yvel Guichet & Mark Propst illustrating the present timeline. The story is collected in two softcover volumes.


    There is a great deal of central focus towards magic and magicians in the DC Universe, but also one of its greatest civilizations ever known: the Atlantis! Aww yeah, Atlantis and Aquaman get a nice central focus on this time travel adventure. Zatanna & Tempest both play important roles to the story, but the main secondary characters are the new Justice League that Batman chose personally in case the original members would all wither away, these Leaguers are: Green Arrow, Hawkgirl, Etrigan/Jason Blood, Firestorm, Faith, the Atom (Ray Palmer), Major Disaster and their leader; the one and only, Nightwing!


    I love how the story rotates around between the past and the present, between the main Justice League and the new Justice league. It has a lot of time travel madness you’d except from a writer such as Grant Morrison, but receiving it from Joe Kelly is a pleasant surprise. Tons of great superhero moments from a Superman match that takes across the globe, Batman and Wonder Woman romance, Nightwing leading the Justice League, Green Arrow being a horndog Plastic Man being hilarious and one of the most utterly insane awesome Bat-god moments, this book keeps delivering. It all ties down at the end leaving no plot holes whatsoever behind and concludes its story well.


    Rating: 93/100
    - Incredibly well written story that gives readers two Justice League teams in one story that delivers action, thrills and awesome character moments while also world building DC universe with its past and Atlantis. The art is good and very consistent, while some artists make it a bit more cartoonish then others, the action is good, the facial expressions show emotion and everything looks good.

  20. #895
    Huh. I'll have to read it again.

    Just read Batman #5 and DC Universe Presents #5. The former was insane(ly good). The latter was pretty awesome as well.

    But, there's one thing...

    "Did you believe you could change me, the way I've changed you?"
    "I already did."

  21. #896
    It blew up from being turned on so long, as for the end, I guess we'll have to see in #6.
    signature image

  22. #897
    Oh ok. That's plausible.

    I have to wait until February 15th to see where this leads?

    "Did you believe you could change me, the way I've changed you?"
    "I already did."

  23. #898
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    Thoughts & Rambles: New Teen Titans Omnibus vol 1!

    They are the best there is: The Changeling, shape-shifter supreme; Cyborg, half man/half robot: Kid Flash, super-speedster; Raven, mistress of magic; Robin, the teen wonder; Starfire, alien powerhouse; and Wonder Girl, the amazing Amazon! Together they are the New Teen Titans!

    Marv Wolfman & George Perez brought the Teen Titans to all new heights with their take on the book, Wolfman gives a wonderful introduction to the Omnibus explaining the cast of characters, why he felt X should feel and behave Y way and how he/she would differ from the Z character. The idea was to create very interesting and tangled relationships, increase the emotional force hormone teenagers feel and put them in high danger situations to give those great good old fashioned hero vs. villain vibe going on. Marv expresses a lot on the fact that the Teen Titans have never felt like proper teens; too bland, 1 dimensional and always being very obedient to their mentors. Can you really image a teenager to behave like that? The book is filled with Child/Parent moments, so there is a lot of tension and a good central theme going around the whole 24 issues this book contains.

    I can’t stop expressing myself how much the emotions and relationships are the highlight of the book, from the very first issues when we’re introduced to new and old characters alike from the new ones being Raven, Starfire and Cyborg; to the old school titans Robin, Kid Flash and Wonder Girl it all starts in a huge universe threatening situation with the demon Trigon making his apocalyptic entrance. The book also has the Brotherhood of Evil, Deathstroke the Terminator, Dr. Light, H.I.V.E among others as a threat to the Titans. Guest stars would include the Justice League of America, the Doom Patrol and Hawkman.

    One of my favorite standalone issues would definitely have to be when the Greek Titans escape Tartarus to fight and enslave their child Gods (again keeping the child/parent vibe) with the Teen Titans caught between, but even then the true highlight is the emotional force that these characters endure from their parent issues to their childhood to their current state of live. It’s never easy being a teenager and it especially isn’t easy being a teenager who is also a superhero, while dealing with college and friends.

    The Changeling became my instant favorite Titan of the book. The guy’s such a comedian and carefree, while also a horrible showoff. I just couldn’t stop cheering for this guy, his jokes range from hilarious to downright horrible and all the characters face good developments that will only go further in the next volume. I’m definitely hoping for some romance between Kid Flash and Raven down the line!

    I will note however that DC glue binded this book, and it was really bothersome to read all under 700-ish pages, you really need a good position and a hold to do this book unlike the far superior Marvel Omnibuses, but Dan Didio has stated he is trying to work this out so hopefully the upcoming New Teen Titans Omnibus 2 will already have sewn bindings, because things are only going to get more impactful with Disco Nightwing, the introduction of Terra and the Judas Contract. Titans, aw yeah!

    Rating: 96/100
    – The characters are incredibly well written and unique, the art for the majority of it is absolutely gorgeous alongside the fill-in artists doing a good job, but I feel the inking for the fill-in artists was too rough. The stories are fun and each develop character(s) and show a lot of variety from Demonic invasions to Space Aliens to evil Nazi factions alongside other evil groups of mischiefs. I will again warn how horrible the glue-binding is and it can get downright annoying to read this book, a lot of good two page splash pages could have been so much better if I had seen them in full detail, but I will not take the way this book was produced in the rating. After all what counts is the story, art and writing over all.

  24. #899
    DC had better shape up their omni production if they want the line to take off. They could have some seriously epic omnibuses but they barely release any and the ones they do are half-assed. They need to copy from the Marvel playbook, Marvel has got it going on.
    "Sleep? That bed is a coffin and those are winding sheets. I do not sleep I die." - Captain Ahab

  25. #900
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    Originally Posted by Old_BenKenobi
    DC had better shape up their omni production if they want the line to take off. They could have some seriously epic omnibuses but they barely release any and the ones they do are half-assed. They need to copy from the Marvel playbook, Marvel has got it going on.
    Yeah, well Dan Didio did respond on Facebook about trying to fix this. Let's hope he is a man of his own words. Will you ever read Holy Terror by the way? You know you need it! It's Batman Year One and Half with Batman and Catwoman murdering terrorists.

    Wolverine by Greg Rucka Ultimate Collection

    It’s the year 2003 with X-Men 2 movie launching and Wolverine’s popularity reaching all new heights in the mainstream audience, so it doesn’t take a genius to figure out it’s the perfect time to release a Wolverine comic with an incredible author and artist attached to the project, enter Greg Rucka & Darick Robertson. This Ultimate Collection collects the 19 issues they did together, with Leo Fernandez illustrating a few issues.

    I want to start talking about this with Darick Robertson’s art just being downright perfect for this Wolverine, especially this particular Wolverine. This book is all about Wolverine fighting his inner animal, questioning himself and assuring himself what he does is morally right. It has that Marvel Knights feeling to it, but it isn’t a Marvel Knights book at all. Most of the villains in this book are simply vile humans. Rapists, crime lords, gangsters and thugs, you name it. The only super villain in this whole collection is none other than Sabretooth himself. Heck, one of the gang lords is a pregnant woman! What would you do? Kill her alongside an innocent baby inside her? It’s not easy being a hero.

    This was an incredible fast read despite being 19 issues, like I stated this is a character study of Wolverine, the honorable loner samurai who does what he does to ensure no one else would go down that path, with his arch nemesis Sabretooth being the monster that pretends to be an animal with full enjoyment. Nightcrawler guest stars in a few issues and seems to be the only friend Wolverine can talk to about his problems, and as usual Rucka fashion you have a brand new female character introduced as a supporting character who also kicks ass.

    Rating: 89/100 – Great take on the character enchanced with Robertson’s art to give this a very dirty and nasty look to it as Wolverine deals with the worst scums out there. I didn’t like Fernandez art that much as he drew Wolverine’s face like it was Hugh Jackman’s! Wolverine isn’t supposed to be cute; he’s supposed to be the manliest man out there, like Clint Eastwood. The Sabretooth arc isn’t as interesting as the 14 first issues, but gives us still top quality dialogue between the two characters.
    I kinda forgot to mention, but ultimately found not worth editing to add is why exactly i loved Darick's Wolverine in particular:


    This is what Wolverine should look like.

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