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Thread: Why is the Joker so popular?

Why is the Joker so popular?

  1. #1

    Why is the Joker so popular?

    ....The more I got to know Gotham's rogue gallery, the more I wondered that. I don't understand how comes the Joker has so many fans. Granted, he is an interesting character, but.... why is the favorite of so many?

    The point is, I just don't understand him. Usually the Gotham villains always have something you can relate to; I'd say that to me some of the best Batman stories are those which allow you to put yourself in the antagonist's point of view. Proof enough is that quite a few Batman stories even have the antagonist as the protagonist; with Batman being only mentioned or only making a brief deus ex machina apparition on the scene.
    Really, who hasn't once, maybe during an idle chatter with friends, made a comment about how we humans are destroying the planet and the world may be better off without us (Ra's al Gul, Poison Ivy)? And don't we all agree that intelligence is the proved two-sided weapon of choice of the human race, which both invented penicillin and the atomic bomb (Riddler)? Don't we all struggle between good and evil (Two-Face)?

    Sometimes we can feel a certain pity for the villains, as we see them as pretty miserable wretches - just think about Arnold Wesker or Victor Fries for example. This never diminishes the fact that they're all pretty scary to us. But there is the counterpart: they scare us and we disapprove of their evil deeds, but at the same time, all of them have an human side.

    Not the Joker. The Joker is completely inhuman. He never feels guilt, he never wonders about his deeds, he never really has any human emotion besides gratuituous cruelty. Sure, sometimes there have been attempts to give him a soul, such as in the Killing Joke, but let's face it: at its core, the Joker character is only a mean concentrate of pure evilness.
    And this makes him a rather interesting villain, of course. But why the most interesting? What do so many people find in the Joker? I see that character, and I see emptiness: his total lack of any human feelings makes him.... too superficial to hold my interest.

    So, after all this blahblahblah, here is the core of the post: why is the Joker so popular?
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  2. #2
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    Because he is the goddamed Joker!!! I just wanted to say that.

    Everything u described about Joker is the reason he is popular. Not careing for anyones life other than his doesn't plan but just does things without consideration and he is also the complete opposite of Batman with out Joker Batman has no complete purpose. They need each other.

  3. #3
    I agree it does make Joker kind of superficial and uninteresting to think that he's the stereotypical villain with no depth that has an impossible amount of cruelty with no cause, but I have to say the contributing factors to him being so popular are:

    - Heath Ledger, no matter how much anyone hates it or wants to deny it. He brought new aspects to the character (glasgow smile scars, lacking fear of death and pain, anarchistic world view)

    - His unpredictability. One minute he's a hilarious, harmless prankster, the next an inhumanly brutal savage. There's no telling what he'll do if you accept (or deny) his offer to pull his finger or tell a knock-knock joke.

    - The fact that's he's probably one of the most demented, sick villains in fiction history (forcing a bank owner to masturbate to his own very young daughter's picture in Azzarello's Joker, crippling and defiling Barbara Gordon in The Killing Joke, beating Jason Todd within an inch of his life with a crowbar and then blowing him and his mother up in Death In The Family, tossing babies out a nursery window in No Man's Land, killing babies while having sex with Harley in Ashes to Ashes) "When supervillains want to scare each other, they tell Joker stories"

    - Mark Hamill's awesome voice and performance

    - The ironic feel that despite looking as a clown, a being that is often interpreted as silly, harmless, childish, despite some people having a fear of clowns, he's perhaps the worst mass murderer in America

    - Batman is the world's greatest detective and even he can barely predict what the Joker is going to do next. That's true chaos

    Probably a ton of other reasons, but I can't remember them all right now.

    BTW to original poster of the topic, I think you've made some very good points, I like how you relate Gotham's villains to us, I think it's very, very true

  4. #4
    Joker is Batman's #1 arch-nemesis. He's recurring in almost all the Batman cartoons and Batman comics. He's portrayed more often, which makes many people think he's awesome and all. That's he he's popular. He's known. If you ask someone, even someone unfamiliar with Batman they'll talk about Joker. Some people that aren't deeply into Batman know the Joker mainly from TDK movie. And because of Heath, Joker was popular world-wide as well. Also, his laugh was another thing. No matter who voice acted for Joker, the laugh is always something that makes Joker, Joker. & Not to mention his famous quotes, lines, etc.

    -Why so serious?
    -Let's put a smile on that face.
    -You remind me of my father... I HATED my father.
    -Ha! You kill me... Ha! I LOVE this guy!
    -Have a face full of PIE; My treat.
    -It's getting late; I gotta get home... Can't wait to see whose it's gonna be!
    -Kaboom! Hahaha, just kidding.
    -Batman, you will soon make a great Joker... Just don't forget to SMILE.
    Happiness is an illusion. Suffering is real.

  5. #5
    Originally Posted by DarkKnightReturns
    I agree it does make Joker kind of superficial and uninteresting to think that he's the stereotypical villain with no depth that has an impossible amount of cruelty with no cause, but I have to say the contributing factors to him being so popular are:
    I don't think he is stereotypical at all, I consider the other villains the stereotype. Everyone always tries to make you feel sorry for a villain. So few villains are written to be inexcusably ruthless. The worst thing you can do to a villain is make you feel sorry for him or give him empathy then he just becomes a misunderstood good guy. This is why The Killing Joke is not my favorite Joker story, the more you know about a character the less you fear and respect him. The reason everyone always craves more Joker is bc he is so disconnected, so uncontrollable, and so unattainable. If he was more sterotypical (sympathetic, relatable, having a "depthy" back story) he might not even be around anymore.

    Everyone is always trying to make bad good guys and good bad guys and I'm tired of it!!!
    W.W.B.D. What Would Batman Do?

  6. #6
    Originally Posted by Matches Malone
    Everyone is always trying to make bad good guys and good bad guys and I'm tired of it!!!
    Let's put a smile on that face.



    Happiness is an illusion. Suffering is real.

  7. #7
    To DarkKnightReturns: that was a good explanation about the interesting sides you can find in the Joker!

    However, I must say that when I consider this post here:

    Originally Posted by jvini
    Joker is Batman's #1 arch-nemesis. He's recurring in almost all the Batman cartoons and Batman comics. He's portrayed more often, which makes many people think he's awesome and all. That's he he's popular. He's known. If you ask someone, even someone unfamiliar with Batman they'll talk about Joker. Some people that aren't deeply into Batman know the Joker mainly from TDK movie. And because of Heath, Joker was popular world-wide as well. Also, his laugh was another thing. No matter who voice acted for Joker, the laugh is always something that makes Joker, Joker. & Not to mention his famous quotes, lines, etc.

    I come to wonder if the real reason of Joker's popularity is pretty much only because they always portray him everywhere.




    Originally Posted by Matches Malone
    I don't think he is stereotypical at all, I consider the other villains the stereotype.

    By the definition of "stereotype", I doubt any of the Gotham villains could fit apart from the Joker. And Joker's stereotype is precisely the fact that he is a mere villain. And nothing more. Just evil. ONLY evil.



    Originally Posted by Matches Malone
    Everyone always tries to make you feel sorry for a villain. So few villains are written to be inexcusably ruthless. The worst thing you can do to a villain is make you feel sorry for him or give him empathy then he just becomes a misunderstood good guy.

    You know what the problem is? You seem to think that if one feels sorry for the villain, then that villain isn't a villain anymore. This is very superficial, and it works only in children tales.
    Actually, the point is that you do feel sorry for the villain, but at the same time, he or she IS a villain, an evil, psychotic if you will, bastard. And that's the interesting part. The fact that poor Arnold Wesker suffers from his insanity does not change the fact that he is a cruel mob boss who ruthlessly kills people. The fact that we can feel compassion for the Penguin's self-esteem issues and we can feel tenderness at his love for birds, does NOT change the horrible deeds he does, and he doesn't even have the excuse of madness since he is perfectly in-control. And even if Ivy loves her plants so much, isn't she still terribly scary because of her complete lack of any empathy towards human beings?

    I think that is the mature approach. Evilness is always derived from sufference. No one who is living an happy and content life would ever turn to evil! The other Gotham rogues remind us of that. We aren't able to forgive them for what they do; yet we somehow understand them. This remembers us, and warns us, that evil is very much.... human.

    And that is why the Joker seems so superficial to me. And the fact that I can't relate to him in any way makes him feel so soulless and dehumanized to me, that he gets.... well, boring. I'm sorry, but gorey tricks and homicides aren't enough to keep my interest if the character performing them is just a random killing machine instead of a living being with emotions.
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    "You can't be disgusted by spiderwebs! You're Batman!"

  8. #8
    -Scary clowns are popular. Examples: SweetTooth (Twisted Metal), Stephen King's IT, Killer Klowns from Outer Space

    -Heath Ledger, Jack Nicholson, Mark Hamill, & Cesar Romero (to a lesser extent) popularized the Joker.

    -He is Batman's most recurring foe. You can argue that he is overexposed, or just the essential arch nemesis of the Batman.

    -He is the most chaotic, living life unpredictable, violently, always trying to corrupt his surroundings and hurt others to fulfill his dystopic vision which as stories like Killing Joke have suggested is the result of a past traumatic experience that irreversibly transformed him. Some people can relate to this & love the character. Many people go through painful experiences, snap, and become bad people who get off on hurting others. When they hurt people they think it is funny, because although he/she can't laugh at what they've gone through, they can easily laugh at the misfortunes of others (= chaos mentality). Batman can see through this, and thus refuses to give in and kill Joker or anyone else. Batman dealt with his trauma a much better way & doesn't believe one bad day will turn him evil, & he doesn't misdirect his hostility. Joker's facile philosophy is actually his weakness, as seen at the end of "The Dark Knight" when he puts on a sad face when he realizes his social experiment has failed.

  9. #9
    Originally Posted by E.Nygma
    I come to wonder if the real reason of Joker's popularity is pretty much only because they always portray him everywhere.
    Joker is a well known Batman character, even to non-Batman fanatics because of TDK. Regular Batman fans do know Joker well, and therefore popularating him, because he was portrayed a lot in everything related to Batman. I wouldn't say mainly because of that, but many people know Joker and not someone like the Creeper, or the Great White Shark if they're not comic readers.
    Happiness is an illusion. Suffering is real.

  10. #10
    Originally Posted by E.Nygma

    And that is why the Joker seems so superficial to me. And the fact that I can't relate to him in any way makes him feel so soulless and dehumanized to me, that he gets.... well, boring. I'm sorry, but gorey tricks and homicides aren't enough to keep my interest if the character performing them is just a random killing machine instead of a living being with emotions.
    We obviously just disagree with what makes a good villain. Everything you just described about him is so awesome to me! I think you need to look at the Joker beyond what you see on the surface. He is obviously a severe sociopath (look it up if you don't know what it means) who sees through all the mundane patterns, routines, and things that we think are important and value in our lives, he completely lacks empathy and emotion, when you have no emotions its very hard to find value in things so everything is a big joke including life itself. It drives him crazy that no one else can see the world the way he sees it, everyone is so set on being so serious all the time, so he makes it his mission to show everyone what a big joke their lives are. What makes him even more awesome is that this is the polar opposite of Batman. Really he is the deepest character of them all IMO you just have to get to know him

    Making a villain who you feel sorry for has just become so terribly cliche'. The Joker is the Alpha and the Omega

    If you gave him a back story, made him sympathetic and flushed him out into the open he would be like EVERY OTHER VILLAIN and become THE REAL STEREOTYPE. And would also destroy everything that EVERYONE ELSE finds so fascinating.
    W.W.B.D. What Would Batman Do?

  11. #11
    Originally Posted by E.Nygma
    I come to wonder if the real reason of Joker's popularity is pretty much only because they always portray him everywhere.
    You think of things backwards. He is everywhere bc he is so popular.
    W.W.B.D. What Would Batman Do?

  12. #12
    I respectfully disagree with Matches Malone. Making a villain sympathetic can only enhance them. No one is born bad. Tragic villains are the exact opposite of cliche stereotypes - in fact, the soulless, mindless killing machine is the more cliche stereotype instead, because it makes them easier to hate, and that in general is what mindless action entertainment is all about, is being able to point your finger at the bad guy and not feel the least bit guilty when he gets his comeuppance in the ending. Name one sympathetic villain you have ever seen from Die Hard, or Lethal Weapon, or Rambo, or just about any generic action genre you have seen.

    Adding tragedy to a villain adds depth to them. No one is inherently bad, there is always something to spark their bad deeds. BTAS did a wonderful job at creating several tragic villains out of Mr. Freeze, Two-Face, Harley Quinn, Baby-Doll, and several others. When you find yourself sympathizing with the villain you get conflicted and it makes the story all the more interesting. It would be very boring if you cared only about the interests of only one or very few characters.

    One could say Joker is overexposed or overrated, but I think in a strange way he's earned his place as Batman's main villain. Part of what makes him seem so ruthless is the mystery behind him. No one knows his true origin or his past life. It could be the most tragic thing or the most trivial thing, but that's the beauty of it; we'll NEVER find out, and it only makes him more interesting.

  13. #13
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    Originally Posted by E.Nygma
    ....The more I got to know Gotham's rogue gallery, the more I wondered that. I don't understand how comes the Joker has so many fans. Granted, he is an interesting character, but.... why is the favorite of so many?
    He and Catwoman pretty much became instant iconic characters since Batman #1. Joker has received alot of attention and ever since #1 there has been conflict between Batman and the Joker. It just became the writer's thing that Joker is Batman's yang and the fans loved him so fanbase + good story telling = good character.

    Not the Joker. The Joker is completely inhuman. He never feels guilt, he never wonders about his deeds, he never really has any human emotion besides gratuituous cruelty. Sure, sometimes there have been attempts to give him a soul, such as in the Killing Joke, but let's face it: at its core, the Joker character is only a mean concentrate of pure evilness.
    How did TKJ attempt to give him a soul? The story narrated by Joker is completely false and even Joker laughs on it. He confuses and changes his own past to the limit he probably has forgotten it. Concerning Joker's motivation for what he does is basicly attention. You can have him as a big mafia bully who wants it all. You can have him wanting to be the clown at Midnight who kills the Batman and then you can have him as the harmless prankster who wants a laughing contest with Robin. There all motivated by his own needs to do what he does best.

    And this makes him a rather interesting villain, of course. But why the most interesting? What do so many people find in the Joker? I see that character, and I see emptiness: his total lack of any human feelings makes him.... too superficial to hold my interest.
    Depends really. I'm liking the possible idea that Joker is now a private detective and killing off all the Black Glove members from Batman R.I.P because his Batman is "dead" now. He's motivated by the things he wishes to do and there all pretty wild cards out there.
    I come to wonder if the real reason of Joker's popularity is pretty much only because they always portray him everywhere.
    As someone else said. It's the otherway around.

    You know what the problem is? You seem to think that if one feels sorry for the villain, then that villain isn't a villain anymore. This is very superficial, and it works only in children tales.
    Harley Quinn is on the top loser villains of Batman yet she's loved because she's joking, charming and always there trying to find her place in the world whenever it's with Joker or her friends. She's like probably the most loved fictional loser villain there is.

    And that is why the Joker seems so superficial to me. And the fact that I can't relate to him in any way makes him feel so soulless and dehumanized to me, that he gets.... well, boring. I'm sorry, but gorey tricks and homicides aren't enough to keep my interest if the character performing them is just a random killing machine instead of a living being with emotions.
    But isn't Joker in a way just pure emotion? He laughs, he cries, he gets angry for no reason or a good reason! He's a total wackjob. The feel to fill his greed to do his things to Gotham and rule it and play it like a big bad mafia man.

  14. #14
    See I think truly evil people are born bad and vice verse for good people. Bruce Wayne could have easily been turned to villain and sought revenge but instead his character traits led him to pursue a life of helping others as where Joker obviously used his negative life to destroy other lives. Maybe its bc I'm a soulless atheist who doesn't believe in devine intervention, but I think good people will always be good people and bad people will always be bad people despite circumstance. Circumstance, i believe, defines what type of person we really are, religion can make bad people behave but inside they are still bad people.

    There can be no good without evil.

    My intoxication may have caused me to go off on a bit of tangent there
    W.W.B.D. What Would Batman Do?

  15. #15
    Because deep down inside all of us, there's something that just wants to see the world burn.

  16. #16
    Originally Posted by Matches Malone
    See I think truly evil people are born bad and vice verse for good people.
    I'm really sorry to step on your toes, but I just can't see how that works.

    Would Bruce Wayne have grown up to not be spoiled, irresponsible, flirtatious, pampered, inexperienced, instead of humble, brooding, and obsessed if his parents weren't killed?

    Would Harvey Dent, who had the purest intentions and was incorruptible, have turned to crime if his father did not abuse him as a child and his face was not scarred with acid?

    Would Victor Fries, a prominent doctor who was working for the good of mankind, have turned to crime if he was able to save his wife and was not forever imprisoned in ice?

    Would Harley Quinn, a psychologist for the criminally insane who wanted to help people, have turned to crime if she wasn't starved for affection and felt uninspired until Joker manipulated her and turned her insane?

    Would Pamela Isley, a botanist, have turned to crime if her professor had not attempted to kill her?

    People are never simply born bad, things happen to them that make them do things that they normally wouldn't do.

  17. #17
    Because he's Batman's arch-nemesis and is a really enjoyable character to read and watch?
    "Sleep? That bed is a coffin and those are winding sheets. I do not sleep I die." - Captain Ahab

  18. #18
    Originally Posted by DarkKnightReturns
    I'm really sorry to step on your toes, but I just can't see how that works.

    Would Bruce Wayne have grown up to not be spoiled, irresponsible, flirtatious, pampered, inexperienced, instead of humble, brooding, and obsessed if his parents weren't killed?

    Would Harvey Dent, who had the purest intentions and was incorruptible, have turned to crime if his father did not abuse him as a child and his face was not scarred with acid?

    Would Victor Fries, a prominent doctor who was working for the good of mankind, have turned to crime if he was able to save his wife and was not forever imprisoned in ice?

    Would Harley Quinn, a psychologist for the criminally insane who wanted to help people, have turned to crime if she wasn't starved for affection and felt uninspired until Joker manipulated her and turned her insane?

    Would Pamela Isley, a botanist, have turned to crime if her professor had not attempted to kill her?

    People are never simply born bad, things happen to them that make them do things that they normally wouldn't do.
    No I don't think Bruce would have grown up to be spoiled. Just like I think if you take all the situations of the villains you just mentioned and put Bruce in those situations, would you get the same result? I don't think so. Say you take the Joker before he was "the Joker" and put him in Bruce's life, his parents get killed just like Bruce's he would still turn to villainy would he not? I'm just saying Bruce had a bad a day as anyone and he didn't turn to villain bc deep down he is not a good person (hush reference) but deep, deep down he is a good person Everyone has bad things happen to them its what we do with our circumstances that make us good or evil. If everyone turned evil every time something traumatic happened to them there wouldn't be a good person left on the earth. The idea that you can justify a persons inappropriate/evil/bad behavior bc you had a rough childhood, or something like that, is weak and immature, again IMO.

    Circumstance doesn't make the man a man makes the circumstance.
    W.W.B.D. What Would Batman Do?

  19. #19
    This is a very interesting topic but I believe that we have to define what is good and what is evil. Sometimes evil is just our primitive instinct looking to ensure not only our survival but also our comfort and pleasure. Sometimes good is just our display of the behavior that society has inculcated on us. The Joker is beyond this concepts and that is what makes him such and iconic and interesting character. He is beyond good and evil. He is not controlled by law, society or even sanity. For The Joker insanity is the ultimate freedom and in a way that is what everyone looks for, for the ultimate freedom. Superficially it seems that no one can really relate to The Joker’s inhumanity, but deep down we can all relate to it. We can relate to that search for complete freedom from the control of others (society, the law) and freedom from ourselves (our self-control and even sanity). A freedom that would allow us to do just whatever we want.

  20. #20
    DarkKnightReturns and Matches Malone, thing is, I think you both are right.

    On one hand, people aren't just born evil, and so there needs to be a lot of sufference to turn someone into a killer, or a criminal, or a psychopath. In this, it's obvious that if Bruce Wayne didn't had to go through that tragedy as a kid, he would never have become Batman.

    On the other hand, it's the nature of the person who reacts to a tragedy that makes the difference. Not everyone who goes through the same ordeal necessarily ends up a criminal or such. In this, if Bruce Wayne didn't suffer the loss of his parents, he would never have become Batman but he would still have become a philanthrope, and a good man.

    So I think both sides have their equal importance in how a person becomes. Circumstance makes the man and man makes the circumstance.


    ....And now, to return in-topic. So it seems to me that people who like Joker so much basically think "Oh look, he randomly does anything he wants whenever he wants and never cares about anybody, how cool!".
    Seems rather.... immature? It's like a young kid's fantasy of egocentrism. Not to mention that some fans find the Joker so cool, and totally disregard the horrible deeds he's done (or do they find those cool, too?).

    Joker works fine as a villain, don't get me wrong. But he's the villain of an action movie, like someone mentioned, or of an action videogame. You can't make psychological stories about the Joker. You can't get into the thoughts of the character, because he doesn't have them - he is merely the guy who does evil things.
    Now, this would actually be fine, too, if only the rogue gallery of Gotham didn't abund with such compelling and more detailed villains.
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    "You can't be disgusted by spiderwebs! You're Batman!"

  21. #21
    Originally Posted by E.Nygma
    And now, to return in-topic. So it seems to me that people who like Joker so much basically think "Oh look, he randomly does anything he wants whenever he wants and never cares about anybody, how cool!".
    Seems rather.... immature? It's like a young kid's fantasy of egocentrism. Not to mention that some fans find the Joker so cool, and totally disregard the horrible deeds he's done (or do they find those cool, too?).

    Joker works fine as a villain, don't get me wrong. But he's the villain of an action movie, like someone mentioned, or of an action videogame. You can't make psychological stories about the Joker. You can't get into the thoughts of the character, because he doesn't have them - he is merely the guy who does evil things.
    Now, this would actually be fine, too, if only the rogue gallery of Gotham didn't abund with such compelling and more detailed villains.
    I am sorry but I have to disagree. Every comic book villain commits hideous crimes. From The Riddler to The Joker. The acts they commit may or may not be relevant to their own psychological issues, so of course the fans are going to find some of these crimes “cool” because they reflect the psychological issues that their characters have. The Riddler wouldn’t have been a famous villain if his riddles weren’t deadly. The same applies to The Joker. He wouldn’t be a villain if he didn’t commit the hideous crimes that he commits. Now the reasons for his crimes can be very complex but not always random. Sometimes, he does what he does to make Batman realize that he has to let go of his self-control and moral code and just become like him. That explains why he taunts batman to kill him. The Joker has a variety of stories that reflect the deepness of the character reflecting him not only as pure evil but something more. For example in Emperor Joker he wants to destroy the whole universe so people like him wouldn’t exist. It is hard to explain what goes in the mind of The Joker and that complexity is what is so attractive.

  22. #22
    k1ll1ng j0k3, couldn't have said it better if I sat down all day to think about it. Well said

    E.Nygma yes I don't completely disagree with you as I do not believe in absolutes. I am aware that in different cases we are both correct. Analyzing the psychological aspects of the Batman Mythos is probably my most favorite thing in the world so I ramble. Thanks for the spar!
    W.W.B.D. What Would Batman Do?

  23. #23
    Originally Posted by Matches Malone
    k1ll1ng j0k3, couldn't have said it better if I sat down all day to think about it. Well said

    E.Nygma yes I don't completely disagree with you as I do not believe in absolutes. I am aware that in different cases we are both correct. Analyzing the psychological aspects of the Batman Mythos is probably my most favorite thing in the world so I ramble. Thanks for the spar!
    Thank you! same here. This is a very interesting topic and I am glad to be part of it. E.Nygma brought up very valid points but I believe that they apply mostly to people that saw The Dark Knight and became instant fans of The Joker without really understanding the different aspects of the character. Anyway I am having a blast so thank you.

  24. #24
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    Regarding all the Bruce talk, heres my 2 cents:

    Morrison touched on a world withouth Batman. It had Thomas Wayne beat up Joe Chill and everyone was happy, so Bruce grows up as a mama's little loser boy whos Gotham's laughing stock. Noone takes him seriously not even at his work. (He became a doctor like his father) Ultimately Joker rises in Gotham and kills James Gordon, Dick Grayson and the other Flying Graysons... So yeah a world withouth Batman sucks!

    Then theres another story! In this story the villain changes reality by making Batman into a anti-hero cowboy fan instead of a Zorro fan. When the Wayne Family died Bruce became a cowboy inspired villain killer named Paladin.

    Originally Posted by E.Nygma
    .And now, to return in-topic. So it seems to me that people who like Joker so much basically think "Oh look, he randomly does anything he wants whenever he wants and never cares about anybody, how cool!".
    Seems rather.... immature? It's like a young kid's fantasy of egocentrism. Not to mention that some fans find the Joker so cool, and totally disregard the horrible deeds he's done (or do they find those cool, too?).
    He has the touch! He has the power! He can do anything he wants because theres really noone to stop him. Sure Batman comes and stops him but sooner or later he escapes Arkham because writers will never write Batman to improson Joker to a Green Lantern prison for example.

    So really just think of this: If everyone in the world we're given super powers. How many of you think would go wild and abuse these powers? It's the same here with Joker except he's just a brilliant mastermind who knows his mobster ways in Gotham.
    Joker works fine as a villain, don't get me wrong. But he's the villain of an action movie, like someone mentioned, or of an action videogame. You can't make psychological stories about the Joker. You can't get into the thoughts of the character, because he doesn't have them - he is merely the guy who does evil things.
    Yes you can make psychological stories out of him because of how crazy he is. "Joker" shows a wide range of everything Joker is and the Killing Joke is just showing how truly nuts he actually is while also touching upon Bruce's own insanity aswell.

  25. #25
    Originally Posted by k1ll1ng j0k3
    I am sorry but I have to disagree. Every comic book villain commits hideous crimes. From The Riddler to The Joker. The acts they commit may or may not be relevant to their own psychological issues, so of course the fans are going to find some of these crimes “cool” because they reflect the psychological issues that their characters have.

    No, no, comparing the Riddler to the Joker, or any other Gotham villain with the Joker, is nonsense. NO ONE of the Gotham rogues does cruel things merely for the fun of it. And no one of them is ever capable of reaching the levels of gratuituous nastiness that the Joker achieve. Each of the Gotham rogues commit evil for a motivation. Wether it's just looking for attention, like the Riddler, or protecting the plants, like Poison Ivy, or even becoming a rich and powerful mob boss, like Scarface.... all of them have a motivation that leads them to commit certain evil deeds. But the Joker is very different. More often than not he has no real motivation to do what he does. Would Scarface, Ivy, Riddler, Two-Face, Penguin, and so on, stop in their way to hideously torture a random person which just happened to cross the street? No. Only the Joker would.


    Originally Posted by k1ll1ng j0k3
    The Riddler wouldn’t have been a famous villain if his riddles weren’t deadly. The same applies to The Joker.

    "Others are mad enough to kill. But not I."

    "The Joker's KILLING people, for god's sake!!"

    "Too many are vying for the medias attention these days. Most of them are homicidal maniacs. What competition can a mere criminal genius offer?"


    All actual quotes from the Riddler.
    .....I'm sorry, I know the Riddler better than you. :P
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    "You can't be disgusted by spiderwebs! You're Batman!"

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