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shadowmatt18
31st Jan 2009, 18:51
so i just read the killing joke if any of you are familair with it and at the end we see a tiny glimpse of the jokers sane side when he considers what batman is saying. would it be out of character for joker to thank batman for atleast trying to bring him out of the darkness or would it be good if we can atleast know that joker is a human being? i ask this because ever since i read the killing joke i'm wondering if all the joker versions just want batman to help them. any thoughts?

Wigglez
31st Jan 2009, 22:10
Some might be a cry for help. I don't really know that. But some are actually insane and some just started crime to taunt and break Batman.

Drazar
31st Jan 2009, 22:20
In a way Joker does thank Batman, but just states that he has gone to far to be redeemed.

HystericFreak
31st Jan 2009, 23:39
When the Joker is Emperor Joker, he's at his most altruistic. He wants to destroy everything so that there'll be a clean slate, a place free of taint, and a place where there'll be no people like him.

I don't think he needs Batman's help, but he understands that they are opposing forces. Though he actively seeks to kill and destroy Batman, he also has a hang up on making it perfect, which could be seen as hesitation... Who knows.

Ahh puddin'... =P

shadowmatt18
1st Feb 2009, 02:36
soooo let's say that were dealing with the realistic heath ledger joker, would he want batman to try and save him? like batman says in the killing joke "i can rehabilitate you, you wouldn't have to be alone anymore."? would that be out of character for the heath ledger joker not to consider it like the comic version?

Drazar
1st Feb 2009, 02:45
soooo let's say that were dealing with the realistic heath ledger joker, would he want batman to try and save him? like batman says in the killing joke "i can rehabilitate you, you wouldn't have to be alone anymore."? would that be out of character for the heath ledger joker not to consider it like the comic version?

If Nolan would make his Joker into "super insane" who recreates himself, its perfectly possible. Joker for now is just a mass-murdering mastermind criminal who just sees Batman as his perfect playmate. So depending on the mood, i would say yes.

PS. The only realistic thing about Nolan's Joker is the fact that someone like him would rise up againts a vigilante, + no permawhite skin by a chemical plant. :P Joker's personality was pure comic.

ysoserious1999bday
1st Feb 2009, 03:23
Ahh puddin'... =P

LOL HARLEQUIN SED THAT IN THE SHOW :nut:

shadowmatt18
1st Feb 2009, 18:35
If Nolan would make his Joker into "super insane" who recreates himself, its perfectly possible. Joker for now is just a mass-murdering mastermind criminal who just sees Batman as his perfect playmate. So depending on the mood, i would say yes.

PS. The only realistic thing about Nolan's Joker is the fact that someone like him would rise up againts a vigilante, + no permawhite skin by a chemical plant. :P Joker's personality was pure comic.

ok thanks, i was wondering that for awhile.

Joe-Kerr
8th Feb 2009, 12:43
If Nolan would make his Joker into "super insane" who recreates himself, its perfectly possible. Joker for now is just a mass-murdering mastermind criminal who just sees Batman as his perfect playmate. So depending on the mood, i would say yes.

PS. The only realistic thing about Nolan's Joker is the fact that someone like him would rise up againts a vigilante, + no permawhite skin by a chemical plant. :P Joker's personality was pure comic.


No, i wouldn't, The Joker in Nolan's Batman more importantly would'nt dare give Batman the 'satisfaction' of winning him over. The Joker plunges to his death laughing into insanity that Batman got 'the better over him', although he is saved at the last moment. He is a bit pissed off at that point that he didn't fall. Yet he says to Batman 'You, you just couldn't let me go...'. He's not only a loose-cannon in The Dark Knight, but, like classic Joker, like The Joker as he should be, has no morals no principles and is fearless to death. As Heath has said 'Everythings a big joke to him'.

Drazar
8th Feb 2009, 13:31
No, i wouldn't, The Joker in Nolan's Batman more importantly would'nt dare give Batman the 'satisfaction' of winning him over. The Joker plunges to his death laughing into insanity that Batman got 'the better over him', although he is saved at the last moment. He is a bit pissed off at that point that he didn't fall. Yet he says to Batman 'You, you just couldn't let me go...'. He's not only a loose-cannon in The Dark Knight, but, like classic Joker, like The Joker as he should be, has no morals no principles and is fearless to death. As Heath has said 'Everythings a big joke to him'.

Thats why i said if Nolan wishes to make Joker super-insane who he is in the comics and recreates himself. ;/ At the moment he is his original mass murderor, but then he went all goofy adam-west style. ;p

RonnyGreen
8th Feb 2009, 15:40
The thing is, I don't think that The Joker has ever been sane, so I don't think he'd reay be able to appreciate what Batman was doing.
The Joker is so screwed up because he has always been screwed up.

Joe-Kerr
8th Feb 2009, 18:16
Oh, well, i don't understand now lol.
Are you talking about how The Joker has been interpreted over the years?

First he was original psychopath as he is in TDK. Then came the more goofy years, until a re-invention in The Joker's Five Way Revenge. Soon, novels came out detailing how dark the original Joker was. I think the period when he was most goofy was the 60-70's. But within that period there were dark takes aswell.

The Joker has only been 'Super Insane' in speculation. Mostly in Paul Dini's portrayal. But other than that, The Joker has been insane in most things. TDK was just a serious realistic take or insight into him as a character. You can thank Heath as he basically researched The Joker and finally came to a conclusion to him that the Joker in reality was basically a psychopathic serial killer. With a case of sychitzophrenia.
I hope i helped in some way lol

Drazar
9th Feb 2009, 00:38
Oh, well, i don't understand now lol.
Are you talking about how The Joker has been interpreted over the years?

First he was original psychopath as he is in TDK. Then came the more goofy years, until a re-invention in The Joker's Five Way Revenge. Soon, novels came out detailing how dark the original Joker was. I think the period when he was most goofy was the 60-70's. But within that period there were dark takes aswell.

The Joker has only been 'Super Insane' in speculation. Mostly in Paul Dini's portrayal. But other than that, The Joker has been insane in most things. TDK was just a serious realistic take or insight into him as a character. You can thank Heath as he basically researched The Joker and finally came to a conclusion to him that the Joker in reality was basically a psychopathic serial killer. With a case of sychitzophrenia.
I hope i helped in some way lol

Grant Morrison retconned that Joker has always been "Super Insane" it started from his Arkham Asylum GN. :P Basicly Joker just recreates himself, and as we known in the contuniety. First he was a ****nut mass murdering genius (as he is iN TDK, Since it is the start of Joker), then he became goofy and all and then he recreated himself again to more menacing type. Heath acted the 1st stage of Joker and it will depend on the script-writers how they would/will continue the Joker really. But comic-wise the TDK Joker would eventually go goofy after some years and do stuff like laughing contests with Robin. :p

k1ll1ng j0k3
9th Feb 2009, 15:18
I think we are missing the question and just interpreting how The Joker has been portrayed over the years in comics and movies alike. It’s true that The Joker reinvents himself as he pleases as Grant Morrison portrayed him, he has some kind of “super-sanity”, anyway, I believe that the reason why The Joker thanked Batman is
1.- because he does reinvent himself as he pleases
2.- but most importantly because he sees batman as a kindred soul, they are both unstoppable forces and they are both crazy The Joker realizes that even though batman might be the most logical mind in the world he is as crazy as The Joker, that is what makes Batman unstoppable, he are driven by grief and madness just like The Joker. We can see that relationship in comics and the movie alike, in Arkham Asylum: A Serious House on Serious Earth we can see it when The Joker thanks Batman but even more when both of them start laughing maniacally at the same joke and in the movie when Batman is in the interrogation room with The Joker and he realizes that Batman is a freak like him.

shadowmatt18
9th Feb 2009, 23:00
okay so let's say that the joker begins to go from TDK version into his super insanity comic version. how would a writer or a director show this. does joker just begin to laugh more? on screen he looks more serious when he talks almost like he's bored with everything around him. let's say hypothetically speaking they were making joker come back to show his steps towards the super insanity how would they do this with this version? any thoughts?

BATtleMAN
9th Feb 2009, 23:46
What is the killing joke?

Zsasz
10th Feb 2009, 00:23
What is the killing joke?

Oh nothing, only one of the most influential comics for the Joker's personality(s).

I believe that the Joker was normal, and then after one very bad day he got pushed over the edge, so basically the original interpretation of the Joker, his comedian one anyway.

In my opinion, he was once what was known as a chronic people-pleaser, he needed to make everyone laugh every singe opportunity, and when his stand-up career went awry, he decided to make people laugh in his own special way. With his Venom.

The Joker in this one seems more dark and sarcastic at times, but he also has that zany quality we've come to expect of him.

((By the way, is it just me or does the Joker sound like Kelsey Grammar when he says "How's a guy meant to break out of here" in the trailer?))

Wigglez
10th Feb 2009, 02:00
Oh nothing, only one of the most influential comics for the Joker's personality(s).

I believe that the Joker was normal, and then after one very bad day he got pushed over the edge, so basically the original interpretation of the Joker, his comedian one anyway.

In my opinion, he was once what was known as a chronic people-pleaser, he needed to make everyone laugh every singe opportunity, and when his stand-up career went awry, he decided to make people laugh in his own special way. With his Venom.

The Joker in this one seems more dark and sarcastic at times, but he also has that zany quality we've come to expect of him.

((By the way, is it just me or does the Joker sound like Kelsey Grammar when he says "How's a guy meant to break out of here" in the trailer?))

He f***ing does!!

tomstoyz
10th Feb 2009, 07:09
THE KILLING JOKE is really one of the VERY BEST Batman/Joker stories out there. I highly recommend it to anybody who has not read it yet!