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MattB
25th May 2008, 16:10
I know this game is still under development, but based on what is known about the graphics engine will today's high-end DX10-capable notebook graphics systems (nVidia NVS140M, etc.) likely be able to run DX3 properly when it comes out?

Kneo24
25th May 2008, 16:54
And what exactly do you mean by "properly"?

MattB
25th May 2008, 17:08
And what exactly do you mean by "properly"?

I guess "playably" would have been a better word. I wouldn't expect to be able to run it at 1400x1050 resolution with all graphics options turned to max, but I'd hope for reasonable performance at 1024x768 with medium detail options.

HouseOfPain
25th May 2008, 18:33
This is what worries me =( I have a terrible computer and basically no money to upgrade it. I mean I love Deus Ex but I dont have the 800 dollars to buy new P.C. parts and graphics cards and blah. :mad2: :mad2: :mad2: :mad2: :mad2: :mad2: :mad2: :mad2:

Joseph Manderley's Corpse
25th May 2008, 19:13
I had a million people tell me DXIW wouldn't run worth a crap on my 1.8 P4 with 512RAM GeForce 5200 and it ran perfectly fine. Hold off even worrying about buying a new PC just to run this game. In 2 years when it comes out, then you should look into upgrading or what ever. By that time, you'll probably be better off financially, too.

Kneo24
25th May 2008, 21:11
I guess "playably" would have been a better word. I wouldn't expect to be able to run it at 1400x1050 resolution with all graphics options turned to max, but I'd hope for reasonable performance at 1024x768 with medium detail options.

I imagine the game will run ok at those settings. I can't imagine developers abandoning DX9 PC's right now, especially since a lot of them are running XP, not Vista, and XP currently benchmarks better with games than Vista does.

DXeXodus
26th May 2008, 03:41
You should just wait and see how the game ends up running on your current machine. Maybe put aside some money every month starting now so that when the game is released one day you can maybe upgrade one or two of your machines components.

rhalibus
26th May 2008, 03:52
This is what worries me =( I have a terrible computer and basically no money to upgrade it. I mean I love Deus Ex but I dont have the 800 dollars to buy new P.C. parts and graphics cards and blah.

Upgrading to 2 gig + an Nvidia 8800GT shouldn't break the bank--it's all about the memory and graphics cards these days.

Furthermore...since DX3 must run adequately on an 512 MB XBox 360 or PS3, and it will be released in late 2009--about four years after these "next-gen" consoles came out, I'd say that by the time DX3 ships you can get the above hardware for a song...

In short, don't worry about it. :)

DXeXodus
26th May 2008, 06:20
That is true, unless they optimize the game badly. Too many games have come out lately that look mediocre and run terribly on machines which run much better looking games perfectly.

For instance, my machine can play COD4 on maximum graphics and high resoloution quite well (30fps average), but some games which came out at the same time, if not before, run pathetically on high-ish settings.

It all comes down to optimization IMO

eddiegorey
26th May 2008, 06:39
You'll probably be able to get an xbox 360 for like fifty dollars in 2009.

sea
26th May 2008, 14:30
Considering the game is targeted for release in about a year and a half, but also will appear on consoles, I assume that most people won't have too much trouble playing it. Nevertheless, I think the game should be as scalable as possible and should favour a high framerate and strong art style over huge polygon counts and post-processing effects.

One reason why PC game sales are so low, is that around 5% of the computers around can actually run high-end PC games in the first place. Although I'd love to scold the users for not doing their research and learning about computer hardware, I realise how difficult it is for some people to do this, especially if they haven't grown up with it. Frankly, most users don't have a clue what their PC is capable of outside of what the Best Buy ads tell them, and although some companies like AMD are making initiatives with their AMD Game! OEM machines, it's still an uphill battle, especially when next-gen consoles offer similar graphics performance for much less hassle. In this kind of market situation, I think the burden rests on the developers to make some concessions for the mass market, performance-wise, and that they should choose performance and scalability over cramming as many shaders as possible into the GPU pipeline. Sins of a Solar Empire, a fairly niche PC game without copy protection, has nevertheless been the best-selling PC title for several months largely because peoples' computers can actually play it (even a Radeon 9600 Pro and Pentium 4 will do a decent job).

~Psychotic~
26th May 2008, 14:51
I'm thinking a few things.

1. If it's also made for Vista they'll use DirectX 10 capabilities like Crysis tried. I don't find it a good idea as DirectX 10 is so new and Crysis wasn't that brilliant, it lagged a load in even the best of PCs and DX10 has graphics that aren't too noticable.

2. Even if it's made for Vista it probably won't matter. Anyone who hasn't upgraded to Vista by next year will be screwed and out of support anyway. So even though I would advise not upgrading, you may have to once support updates stop being developed.

3. This game is meant to be released in 2009. Graphics are advancing ever so slightly every year but will they increase so dramatically over the next year? I'm not sure. DirectX 10 might and probably will.

4. Console owners won't have to worry about this. But I'm hoping some improvements will be made in the graphics department for the next-gen consoles. This does mean I'm implying that both the X360 and PS3 have better graphics capabilities than what we've seen, even in the likes of Assassin's Creed and GTA4, I think there's better.

I'm basing point #4 solely off a THEORY. Why? Because if you were to look at the early PS2 games and then look at the more recent ones you'll notice a massive increase in graphics. For example, go take a look at Dynasty Warriors 3 for the PS2 and then check out Samurai Warriors 2 for the same console. MASSIVE graphics increase in those two games.

J.CDenton
26th May 2008, 20:31
We can expect DX3 to be DirectX 10 compatible and certainly it will need Shaders 3.0. Now about the memory I plan it to need 2Gb at less to work properly. It'll depend the graphic engine they'll use also.

MattB
27th May 2008, 00:07
Considering the game is targeted for release in about a year and a half, but also will appear on consoles, I assume that most people won't have too much trouble playing it. Nevertheless, I think the game should be as scalable as possible and should favour a high framerate and strong art style over huge polygon counts and post-processing effects.

One reason why PC game sales are so low, is that around 5% of the computers around can actually run high-end PC games in the first place. Although I'd love to scold the users for not doing their research and learning about computer hardware, I realise how difficult it is for some people to do this, especially if they haven't grown up with it. Frankly, most users don't have a clue what their PC is capable of outside of what the Best Buy ads tell them, and although some companies like AMD are making initiatives with their AMD Game! OEM machines, it's still an uphill battle, especially when next-gen consoles offer similar graphics performance for much less hassle. In this kind of market situation, I think the burden rests on the developers to make some concessions for the mass market, performance-wise, and that they should choose performance and scalability over cramming as many shaders as possible into the GPU pipeline. Sins of a Solar Empire, a fairly niche PC game without copy protection, has nevertheless been the best-selling PC title for several months largely because peoples' computers can actually play it (even a Radeon 9600 Pro and Pentium 4 will do a decent job).

I agree. A game doesn't need graphics that require the latest hardware to look good or to be an entertaining experience. It's always disappointing to find a game that sounds like fun but won't run on your computer. However when the games are scalable there can be pleasant surprises; I personally have been surprised at just how far I can push my notebook's old ATI Radeon 7500 graphics chip.