PDA

View Full Version : very urgent!



monkeytart
19th Jul 2005, 09:49
i want to ask that how many soldiers are in a real battalion during the Napoleonic era?

please help using the format below:

infantry:
cavalry:
cannon crews:
guns:


ps. it's ok if u did not list all

azkatari
19th Jul 2005, 10:48
google can become your new best friend ;)

monkeytart
19th Jul 2005, 14:06
google can become your new best friend ;)
so you mean i can check on webs on google?

Grandmaster
19th Jul 2005, 14:32
http://www.napoleonguide.com/armyind.htm.

La Neige
19th Jul 2005, 14:59
http://www.napoleonguide.com/armyind.htm.
Could you be more specific, perhaps? :)

Mister Nock
19th Jul 2005, 15:39
i want to ask that how many soldiers are in a real battalion during the Napoleonic era?

please help using the format below:

infantry:
cavalry:
cannon crews:
guns:


ps. it's ok if u did not list all

infantry: Usally 10 companies of 100 men, so 1000 in all, but battalions were rarely at full strength.
cavalry: I think it was about 500 per troop.
cannon crews: Depends, between 5 and 10 guys to each gun.
guns: 5 or 6 guns per battery I think.



http://www.napoleonguide.com/armyind.htm.

Very nice site, cheers for the link. *adds to favs*

Eruan
19th Jul 2005, 15:40
There isn't any real answer to that question, Cavalry squadrons vary between about 250 riders to about a 1000. And Infantry is even more varied, as it can range between 200 men all the way up to about 2000 men.

monkeytart
21st Jul 2005, 09:53
come on ppl, plz help! the more information the better! :)

Grandmaster
21st Jul 2005, 10:05
theres lots of info on the web try using a search engine and see what comes up try this sight this gives you lot of info what you are looking for http://web2.airmail.net/napoleon/ scroll down there is lots of info on troop types and such if thats not good anoth try you local Library, and use goggle. www.goggle.com.( search engine).

monkeytart
21st Jul 2005, 10:22
theres lots of info on the web try using a search engine and see what comes up try this sight this gives you lot of info what you are looking for http://web2.airmail.net/napoleon/ scroll down there is lots of info on troop types and such if thats not good anoth try you local Library, and use goggle. www.goggle.com.( search engine).
thnx m8y, really helped :thumbsup: :D :D :D

Oststar
21st Jul 2005, 10:45
Napoleonic age wasn't renouned for it's cohesion... varying nations vary their tactics and strategies and all kinds of things. Even WWII where things were much more of a general consenus the Russians had "Armies" the size of German Corps, whereas the Russians had no Corps size, etc. Plus depending on the division/regiment and such depends on it's size: a heavy infantry division will be larger than an Armoured or especially Airborne unit. So there's no standard number.

Harris0712
22nd Jul 2005, 23:33
I read "Tactics and the Experience of Battle in the Age of Napoleon" by Rory Muir. I can really recommend this book for a thorough analysis of how units were organized and fought at the tactical level.

From the book, here are some basic figures.

Infantry Battalions: -

For a unit in the field, between 500 and 700 officers and men is roughly right. The battalion was sub-divided into companies, varying in number from about 4 to about 10 per battalion. Most battalions had a light company, which was able to deploy as skirmishers when needed, and a grenadier company, which was the battalion's biggest and best soldiers. Sometimes, before a battle started, all the light and grenadier companies in an army where detached and formed into ad hoc light and grenadier battalions. The former could then be used to form a skirmish screen, and the latter a reserve. Infantry made up about 60-90 percent of the men in a battle.

Cavalry Regiments: -

Equivalent in size to an infantry battalion, they typically averaged about 500 men and horses in Cenral Europe, or 300-400 in the Peninsular Campaign. A regiment was sub-divided squadrons, typically 3 or 4. Unlike infantry companies, cavalry squadrons frequently operated independently of the regiment for scouting and other duties. Cavalry made up about 10-20 percent of the men in a battle.

Artillery Batteries: -

The smallest tactical unit in the field, a battery typically had 6-8 guns manned by 100-150 officers and men. Artillery usually only amounted to about 10 percent of the men in a battle.

monkeytart
23rd Jul 2005, 04:11
I read "Tactics and the Experience of Battle in the Age of Napoleon" by Rory Muir. I can really recommend this book for a thorough analysis of how units were organized and fought at the tactical level.

From the book, here are some basic figures.

Infantry Battalions: -

For a unit in the field, between 500 and 700 officers and men is roughly right. The battalion was sub-divided into companies, varying in number from about 4 to about 10 per battalion. Most battalions had a light company, which was able to deploy as skirmishers when needed, and a grenadier company, which was the battalion's biggest and best soldiers. Sometimes, before a battle started, all the light and grenadier companies in an army where detached and formed into ad hoc light and grenadier battalions. The former could then be used to form a skirmish screen, and the latter a reserve. Infantry made up about 60-90 percent of the men in a battle.

Cavalry Regiments: -

Equivalent in size to an infantry battalion, they typically averaged about 500 men and horses in Cenral Europe, or 300-400 in the Peninsular Campaign. A regiment was sub-divided squadrons, typically 3 or 4. Unlike infantry companies, cavalry squadrons frequently operated independently of the regiment for scouting and other duties. Cavalry made up about 10-20 percent of the men in a battle.

Artillery Batteries: -

The smallest tactical unit in the field, a battery typically had 6-8 guns manned by 100-150 officers and men. Artillery usually only amounted to about 10 percent of the men in a battle.
nice! m8y! thnx :eek: :D