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LordSky
16th Apr 2005, 23:14
I just finished playing the demo and uninstalled it. However, securom 7 still remains on my system. I have read the readme file regarding securom but I don't see a way to remove it from my computer. I have already deleted the UAservice7.exe from the system32 folder. I can't seem to remove it from my registry. If you look under HKLM\Software\Securom, you can't remove that folder even if you remove the RESTICTED group from the permissions and reapply the full control permission to all child keys.

I realized that EIDOS and co. needs to added protection to their games but locking ME out of MY computer is ridiculous. Regardless of being told that this will happen, (which I agreed to) but preventing me from removing it puts this in the same boat as those spyware software that prevent you from uninstalling their money makers.

I don't want to discuss the reasons for installing it, I just want securom crap off my machine.

admin_old
16th Apr 2005, 23:21
Hey man, It's easy to remove securom from your comp so don't worry!

Other method to remove securom 7 is:

start > run > msconfig
STOP/DISABLE Securom service
REBOOT
go to \windows\system32
Delete Userivce7.exe
REBOOT
you should be able to remove it from registry now

Good luck :)

LordSky
17th Apr 2005, 22:48
Hey man, It's easy to remove securom from your comp so don't worry!

Other method to remove securom 7 is:

start > run > msconfig
STOP/DISABLE Securom service
REBOOT
go to \windows\system32
Delete Userivce7.exe
REBOOT
you should be able to remove it from registry now

Good luck :)

This removes only the EXE from the memory. If you go to HKLM\CURRENT USERS\Software\Securom. That key can't be viewed nor deleted! :confused:

You also forgot to mention that if you want securom removed from the services snap-in, you have to go to command prompt and type "sc delete uaservice7" to remove it from the services list.

jaywalker2309
17th Apr 2005, 23:02
This removes only the EXE from the memory. If you go to HKLM\CURRENT USERS\Software\Securom. That key can't be viewed nor deleted! :confused:

You also forgot to mention that if you want securom removed from the services snap-in, you have to go to command prompt and type "sc delete uaservice7" to remove it from the services list.

Have had no problems removing securom from the system. Once you've stopped the service within `services.msc` you can delete the exe from the system32 folder, called uaservice.exe. There is also a folder in my documents which can be deleted too (called securom)

Dandor
19th Apr 2005, 14:32
UAService7


What is this service why is it installed and more importantly why is it not removed when the game is uninstalled.



also I need a solution to remove the registry key
I get this message yes I have full rights.
!CAUTION! NEVER DELETE OR CHANGE ANY KEY



Hare people supposed to know that Serurom7 and UAService7 are the same thing?

Any how seeing as you refered me to this thread which provides no solution to my problems care to tell me how to remove the registry keys after I have uninstalled your product?

I have also disabled the service removed the exe file and deleted all but the one registry keys securom which contains the invalid entry "!CAUTION! NEVER DELETE OR CHANGE ANY KEY" and there for prohibiting removal.

Rest assured I will not ever even look at another product that has EIDOS involved and I will ask all my friends to do the same the utter rudeness of this forum are enough to tell me that your products and the related support are not worth me investing my time or money in.

jaywalker2309
19th Apr 2005, 17:47
UAService7
What is this service why is it installed and more importantly why is it not removed when the game is uninstalled.

also I need a solution to remove the registry key
I get this message yes I have full rights.
!CAUTION! NEVER DELETE OR CHANGE ANY KEY

Hare people supposed to know that Serurom7 and UAService7 are the same thing?

Any how seeing as you refered me to this thread which provides no solution to my problems care to tell me how to remove the registry keys after I have uninstalled your product?

I have also disabled the service removed the exe file and deleted all but the one registry keys securom which contains the invalid entry "!CAUTION! NEVER DELETE OR CHANGE ANY KEY" and there for prohibiting removal.

Rest assured I will not ever even look at another product that has EIDOS involved and I will ask all my friends to do the same the utter rudeness of this forum are enough to tell me that your products and the related support are not worth me investing my time or money in.

What point has someone been rude to you?

You'll find that the use of Securom and its service will become much more common and widespread over the next few weeks/months.

I dont know why you are having problems removing the line from the registry.. have you rebooted after stopping/deleting the files..

Dandor
19th Apr 2005, 21:16
yes I have rebooted several times.
the key in question is
[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\SecuRom]
and
[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\SecuRom\!CAUTION! NEVER DELETE OR CHANGE ANY KEY]

the key contains either inbeded control chrs or something that makes it inaccessable.

jaywalker2309
20th Apr 2005, 00:05
yes I have rebooted several times.
the key in question is
[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\SecuRom]
and
[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\SecuRom\!CAUTION! NEVER DELETE OR CHANGE ANY KEY]

the key contains either inbeded control chrs or something that makes it inaccessable.

Its 1am here. Will get someone at Securom to look into the problem and get back to you asap..

Cheers

Sixx2k
20th Apr 2005, 01:17
I agree the Securjunk is getting rediculous. C'mon a cr*CK was released within a WEEK!!! What did the secure-rom accomplish??? All it did was piss off the peeps that BOUGHT the game. Those that rip it could CARE LESS about a WEAK protection service.

Please, am I the only one who realizes this? I'm not saying you should not try to protect your work but there ARE better ways than installing stuff like this.

HELL, HL2 was broken in 2 weeks and it used MUCH BETTER protection than SR!!!!

Just my opinion......

GoranAgar
21st Apr 2005, 09:09
UAService7
...and more importantly why is it not removed when the game is uninstalled.
Imagine you have two games installed that use this copy protection (Project Snowblind and Lego Star Wars) and you uninstall one of them.

Dandor
21st Apr 2005, 10:13
Imagine you have two games installed that use this copy protection (Project Snowblind and Lego Star Wars) and you uninstall one of them.


Ever hear of the concept of and install log?
Most properly designed products not only create one they use it to perform the uninstall. So what your implying never becomes a problem.

GoranAgar
21st Apr 2005, 10:48
Oh, you mean the Project Snowblind install log would know that there is also Star Wars Lego installed on my system? Not bad.

Dandor
21st Apr 2005, 11:22
It would know what it installed and remove what it installed, I have even seen installers tell you something is used by another program and ask if you want to remove it anyway.

It could also simple place the required files in it's own directory and use it from there as many apps do. thus eliminating a potential problem if uninstalled.

the UAService7 does not operate in that fashion for one simple reason it's a service designed to circumvent Xp security measures by negating the need for administrator rights to operate a program which the administrator may have very well decided should not be run. Now I realize that many people who run Xp computers are the computers administrator but just stop and think about the security implications of negating administrator restrictions.
Another point to think about If the system administrator cant remove a program or service then who can and exactly how did they elevate their security above that of the system administrator?

jaywalker2309
21st Apr 2005, 11:46
It would know what it installed and remove what it installed, I have even seen installers tell you something is used by another program and ask if you want to remove it anyway.

It could also simple place the required files in it's own directory and use it from there as many apps do. thus eliminating a potential problem if uninstalled.

the UAService7 does not operate in that fashion for one simple reason it's a service designed to circumvent Xp security measures by negating the need for administrator rights to operate a program which the administrator may have very well decided should not be run. Now I realize that many people who run Xp computers are the computers administrator but just stop and think about the security implications of negating administrator restrictions.
Another point to think about If the system administrator cant remove a program or service then who can and exactly how did they elevate their security above that of the system administrator?

Its not designed to `circumvent` the XP security model. its got a fall back system to enable it to work IF the user isnt admin. Am trying to find out why it runs when user is admin, as the website says, that is not supposed to be the case.

Dandor
21st Apr 2005, 12:47
I could be way off base here however based on the Securom help and faq I get this "This is a Windows Service which is a module of SecuROM. This module has been developed in order to enable users without Windows administrator rights to access all SecuROM™ v7 features.
Please be assured that this service is installed only for security and convenience purposes."


It sure sounds like it's circumventing Xp security and allowing programs to be run that would normaly have been prohibited by other Xp policies.

I don't really see how installing this service helps the Xp security in fact I see that it hinders it.
I fully understand how it helps secure your product I just find it very hard to see how it makes my system more secure, and the only convenience I can find are totally yours, I can see how allowing programs to be run without Windows administrator rights could easily be exploited to the determent of all users.

Windows security model requires administrator rights to perform actions that could be potentially damaging to the system, bypassing these rights for what ever reason can lead to catastrophic system failure,loss of data and or personal information, not to mention rendering the limited user account totally useless as one of the functions of UAService7 is to allow installation and operation of any SecuROM encrypted product EVEN with out administrator rights if you cant see how this can be exploited we have a real problem, it's a matter of time before a virus writer, spy ware author or any other person with malicious intent figures out how to spoof or simulate the existence of a valid SecuROM encrypted executable and by doing so gaining the ability to install what ever they want when ever the want.

Lotto
21st Apr 2005, 18:24
I could be way off base here however based on the Securom help and faq I get this "This is a Windows Service which is a module of SecuROM. This module has been developed in order to enable users without Windows administrator rights to access all SecuROM™ v7 features.
Please be assured that this service is installed only for security and convenience purposes."


It sure sounds like it's circumventing Xp security and allowing programs to be run that would normaly have been prohibited by other Xp policies.

I don't really see how installing this service helps the Xp security in fact I see that it hinders it.
I fully understand how it helps secure your product I just find it very hard to see how it makes my system more secure, and the only convenience I can find are totally yours, I can see how allowing programs to be run without Windows administrator rights could easily be exploited to the determent of all users.

Windows security model requires administrator rights to perform actions that could be potentially damaging to the system, bypassing these rights for what ever reason can lead to catastrophic system failure,loss of data and or personal information, not to mention rendering the limited user account totally useless as one of the functions of UAService7 is to allow installation and operation of any SecuROM encrypted product EVEN with out administrator rights if you cant see how this can be exploited we have a real problem, it's a matter of time before a virus writer, spy ware author or any other person with malicious intent figures out how to spoof or simulate the existence of a valid SecuROM encrypted executable and by doing so gaining the ability to install what ever they want when ever the want.

Maybe you should contact support@securerom.com

They would be able to assist you better. Why talk to the middleman when you can go str8 to the source?

Dandor
21st Apr 2005, 19:06
Maybe you should contact support@securerom.com

They would be able to assist you better. Why talk to the middleman when you can go str8 to the source?

You have no idea what areas I am presueing in this matter.

Maybe you could contribute something usefull just once?

Clumsyorchid
21st Apr 2005, 19:17
what are you pursuing then?

Lotto
21st Apr 2005, 23:50
what are you pursuing then?

Hopefully a grammar class! Just kidding. I understand why people would be upset with a game installing services that can't be uninstalled but this is almost common practice now. Copy Protections like Star Force installs hidded devices/services as well (check out Toca RaceCar Driver 2). The bottom line is that if you don't like things being installed on your system regarding copy protection, then you probably should stop buying games all together. Developers want to protect their investment and you have to get used to this fact. Look at STEAM for HL2 and CounterStrike! This stuff is now going to be common practice.

GoranAgar
22nd Apr 2005, 06:42
Look at STEAM for HL2 and CounterStrike!
Ok, they are really insane. That is why I didn`t get Half Life 2. Would have loved to play it, though.

Pistol
22nd Apr 2005, 07:30
I can see how game companies would want to protect their games and blah blah blah but to be honest they'll NEVER EVER be able to. Anything that is human coded can be cracked no matter how much millions they want to spend on making it secure and uncrackable. So there's really NO point in installing these hiddens services and programs on peoples computers when about 2 to 5 days after the game is released on the market there's already a crack for it that removes all those things and allows you to play it without a cd/dvd and also removes the copy protection.

So I can understand why a gaming company would attempt so hard to protect their games from such things, the bottom line is they can't. They might make things harder, make it take 5 days to crack instead of 2 but in the end it will get cracked. Even the most advance key authentication methods from MS and other games have been cracked ( HL2 had the most insane protection method and it was cracked the 2nd day it was released and everyone was playing it without using STEAM software or being connected to the internet )

All i'm saying pretty much is once you UNINSTALL a game the copy protection should be removed along with it. That copy protection has no right being there if the game using it is gone. If the copy protection service is being used by many games then it should simply say "By removing BLAHBLAH the following games will not run properly" so the user knows and has a choice still. I was able to remove them without a problem so i'm not sure what most people on here are freaking out about, but there's my 2 cents.

Cheers!

Dandor
22nd Apr 2005, 11:51
Someone Please show me where the EULA shows that SecuROM will be installed and it will reamain UNREMOVABLE.

SnowBlind

LICENCE AGREEMENT AND LIMITED WARRANTY
IMPORTANT - Please read this Licence Agreement carefully.
This End-User Licence Agreement ("EULA") is a legal agreement between you and Eidos Inc. ("Eidos" or "we") for the computer game software stated above, which includes computer software and associated media, materials and other documentation together with any updates to the original game software which is provided to you ("Software Product").
Copyright and other intellectual property laws and treaties protect this Software Product. The Software Product is licensed, not sold.
WE ARE ONLY PREPARED TO LICENCE YOU TO USE THE SOFTWARE PRODUCT ON THE TERMS OF THIS EULA. PLEASE READ THROUGH THE FOLLOWING LICENCE CONDITIONS. IF YOU AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THEM PLEASE CLICK I ACCEPT AT THE END OF THIS EULA AT WHICH POINT THE SOFTWARE PRODUCT WILL BE LOADED ONTO YOUR COMPUTER. IF YOU DO NOT AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THE TERMS OF THIS EULA CLICK NOT ACCEPTED AND THE SOFTWARE PRODUCT WILL NOT BE LOADED ONTO YOUR COMPUTER. IF YOU DO NOT ACCEPT THE TERMS OF THIS EULA, PLEASE RETURN THE DISK UNUSED TOGETHER WITH ITS PACKAGING AND DOCUMENTATION TO THE POINT OF PURCHASE FOR A REFUND OF THE PURCHASE PRICE FOR THE SOFTWARE PRODUCT. THE SUPPPLIER RESERVES THE RIGHT, WITHOUT PREJUDICE TO YOUR STATUTORY RIGHTS WHICH ARE NOT AFFECTED, TO WITHHOLD SOME OR ALL OF THE REFUND IF SUCH DISK, PACKAGING OR DOCUMENTATION HAS BEEN DAMAGED IN ANY WAY.
1. Technical Support
If you require technical assistance, please refer to the manual accompanying the Software Product or our web site at http://www.eidos.com.

You will be responsible for all telephone charges.
2. Licence
You are permitted to:
(a) load the Software Product into and use it on a single computer which is under your control and which meets the specifications referred to in the manual for your own private and domestic use;
(b) transfer the Software from one computer to another provided it is used on only one computer at any one time;
(c) transfer the Software Product (complete with all documentation) and the benefit of this EULA to another person provided such person has agreed to accept the terms of this EULA and you contemporaneously transfer any permitted copies of the Software Product you may have made to that person or destroy all copies not transferred. If any transferee does not accept such terms then this EULA shall automatically terminate.
All rights not expressly granted hereunder are, to the extent permitted by law, reserved to Eidos and its licensors. Your rights of use under this EULA are strictly conditional upon your observance of the terms and conditions contained in this Agreement.
3. Restrictions
You are not permitted:
(a) to load the Software Product on to a network server for the purposes of distribution to one or more other computer(s) on that network or to effect such distribution;
(b) except as expressly permitted by this EULA and save and to the extent in the circumstances expressly permitted by applicable law, to rent, lease, sub-licence, loan, exploit for profit or gain, copy, modify, adapt, merge, translate, reverse engineer, decompile, disassemble or create derivative works based on the whole or any part of the Software Product or use, reproduce or deal in the Software Product or any part thereof in any way.
4. Termination
Without prejudice to any other rights, Eidos may terminate this EULA if you fail to comply with the terms and conditions of this EULA. In the event of termination, you must destroy all copies of the Software Product and all of its component parts including any Software Product stored on the hard disk of any computer.
5. Ownership
You only own the media on which the Software Product is recorded. Eidos and/or its licensors shall at all times retain ownership of the Software Product as recorded on the media and all subsequent copies regardless of form.
6. Limited Warranty and Exclusions
6.1 LIMITED WARRANTY: Eidos warrants to the original purchaser of this Software Product that the physical medium on which the Software Product is recorded will under normal use and conditions be free from material defects in materials and workmanship for a period of ninety (90) days from the date of purchase. The entire liability of Eidos under this limited warranty will be, at Eidos’ sole option, either (a) to return of the purchase price paid; or (b) to repair or to replace free of charge the Software Product that does not meet this limited warranty provided you return it in its original condition to the point of purchase with a copy of your receipt. Eidos will pay the costs of sending a replacement Software Product to you.
6.2 The limited warranty in paragraph 6.1 above is void if failure of the Software Product has resulted from accident, abuse or misapplication. Any replacement Software Product will be warranted for the remainder of the original warranty period or thirty (30) days, whichever is longer.
6.3 The limited warranty in this paragraph 6 does not affect your statutory rights which may vary from state/jurisdiction to state/jurisdiction.
6.4 Subject to the limited warranty above, this Software Product is provided "as is" and without warranty of any kind. To the maximum extent permitted by applicable law, Eidos and its licensors disclaims all other representations, warranties, conditions or other terms, either express or implied, including, but not limited to implied warranties and/or conditions of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose, with regard to the Software Product and each and every part thereof. Without prejudice to the generality of the foregoing, Eidos does not warrant that the Software Product is error-free.
6.5 In addition, to the maximum extent permitted by applicable law:
(a) in no event shall Eidos or its licensors be liable for any damages whatsoever (including, but not limited to, direct, indirect, or consequential damages for personal injury, loss of profits, business interruption, loss of information, or any pecuniary loss) arising out of the use of or inability to use this Software Product, even if Eidos has been advised of the possibility of such damages.
(b) in any case, the maximum aggregate liability of Eidos and its licensors under or in relation to this EULA or the use or attempted use of this Software Product shall be limited to the amount actually paid by you for the Software Product.
6.6 Nothing in this EULA shall limit Eidos’ liability to you in negligence for death or personal injury.
7. Governing Law
7.1 Unless you acquired this Software Product in the U.S.A., this EULA and any claim or dispute of whatever nature arising out of or relating to this EULA shall be governed by, and construed in accordance with, English law.
7.2 If you acquired this Software Product in the United States of America this EULA and any claim or dispute of whatever nature arising out of or relating to this EULA shall be governed by, and construed in accordance with, the laws of the State of California, USA.
7.3 The United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods shall not apply to this EULA.

Lotto
22nd Apr 2005, 15:36
I can see how game companies would want to protect their games and blah blah blah but to be honest they'll NEVER EVER be able to. Anything that is human coded can be cracked no matter how much millions they want to spend on making it secure and uncrackable. So there's really NO point in installing these hiddens services and programs on peoples computers when about 2 to 5 days after the game is released on the market there's already a crack for it that removes all those things and allows you to play it without a cd/dvd and also removes the copy protection.

So I can understand why a gaming company would attempt so hard to protect their games from such things, the bottom line is they can't. They might make things harder, make it take 5 days to crack instead of 2 but in the end it will get cracked. Even the most advance key authentication methods from MS and other games have been cracked ( HL2 had the most insane protection method and it was cracked the 2nd day it was released and everyone was playing it without using STEAM software or being connected to the internet )

All i'm saying pretty much is once you UNINSTALL a game the copy protection should be removed along with it. That copy protection has no right being there if the game using it is gone. If the copy protection service is being used by many games then it should simply say "By removing BLAHBLAH the following games will not run properly" so the user knows and has a choice still. I was able to remove them without a problem so i'm not sure what most people on here are freaking out about, but there's my 2 cents.

Cheers!

GoranAgar,

Half-Life 2 was an ok game but overall it left alot to be desired. Doom 3 and Far Cry were alot more satisfying in my humble opinion.

Pistol,

When you talk about copy protecting games is futile, that is absolutely not true. Yes, games will always be cracked and downloaded over the web. However, copy protection prevents the average user from sharing it among their friends. Yes, it is a burden and a pain in the butt for the honest Joe, but the organizations want to ensure maximum profits for their work. The organizations aren't trying to stop copy protection all together.

I knew guys that were heavy into piracy, but eventually grew up and started buying games that they felt were deserving of their money. They got tired of making sure they have a good burner or pirating burning software. They also had to deal with viruses and trojan horses occassionally or deal with games not working after they download the official patch. They got tired of wondering if the No_CD executable they downloaded was actually doing something sinister besides just running the game.

Dandor
4th May 2005, 10:31
Its 1am here. Will get someone at Securom to look into the problem and get back to you asap..

Cheers

What is the status on this?

Nupraptor
8th May 2005, 04:58
What is the status on this?I would like to know, as well. I just e-mailed SecuROM, asking them for assistance. As someone who can't stand to even leave games installed when he's not playing them, I hate hate hate having unnecessary services installed on my computer that I cannot remove.

jaywalker2309
8th May 2005, 10:46
I would like to know, as well. I just e-mailed SecuROM, asking them for assistance. As someone who can't stand to even leave games installed when he's not playing them, I hate hate hate having unnecessary services installed on my computer that I cannot remove.

I am talking to them about creating a utility that will remove securom from your system entirely.

Thanks for contacting them directly, as more people express concerns they start to realise how much people want it. Remember we dont own/write the protection system we only license it from them.

iron_brigade
28th Oct 2005, 13:28
Was this ever resolved? The thread just ended with what seemed to be no conclusive answer as to how to remove this.

Plata77
1st Mar 2006, 16:28
I found this thread, while searching the web for a way to remove the Securom registry key that was mentioned in the first message.
Securom was installed by a game demo on my machine, I have no clue if it was a Eidos game, but actually I don't care.
The funny thing is, that even the admins here don't care. That's why they're asking the users to seek assistance from SecuROM instead of asking here, although it was Eidos-Software that installed SecuROM on their computers! How rediculous is that? It's YOUR problem to solve it, not SecuROMs. The users have no deal with SecuROM and probably they don't want any interaction with them whatsoever.
Additionally, I'd also like to question the sense of these copy protection mechanisms, as they're all bypassed anyway - only the gamer who bought the game is the fool, cause he has to deal with the protection mechanisms and bull**** being installed on his system.
But you probably will disagree although you don't have a better claim - so why don't you just put pressure on the vendors of the copy protection to give the user the option to uninstall the copy protection mechanism completely as any other serious software does. An entry in my "installed programs" list would be enough. That would even be the solution to some admins in here talking about "it stays on the system, cause other software could use it". Oh my god! It should also be in your interest to have satisfied customers - or customers at all - your job depends on it.

To get back to my question: Is there any solution to remove that registry key? And please be so kind and do only answer if you know, what I'm talking about. I have already completely removed the service and the executables of Securom.
By the way, my native language is German, so I'd appreciate it if you wouldn't mock about my grammar (like someone did before with some other user).

anonym
1st Apr 2006, 20:07
Hi all!

After some investigation I found a way how to completly remove Securom from my PC. Here is it:
1. stop UAService7 service (CTRL+ALT+DEL, find it and kill it)
2. using e.g. Autoruns (http://www.sysinternals.com/Utilities/Autoruns.html) remove this service and delete the file \windows\system32\UAService7.exe
3. delete the folder Documents and Settings\<your_user_name>\Application Data\SecuROM
4. delete the folder Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data\SecuROM; in case of any deletion problems use DelInvFile tool
(http://www.purgeie.com/delinv.htm).
5. delete securom registry keys using regedit
6. key named HKLM\SOFTWARE\SecuROM\!CAUTION! NEVER DELETE OR CHANGE ANY KEY* contains embedded nulls and cannot be removed using regedit; use e.g. RegDelNull tool (http://www.sysinternals.com/Utilities/RegDelNull.html) instead of it.

That's all. Now you can just ask why your game distributor uses techniques common for viruses and trojan horses. I state that starting from today I will never purchase anything from Sony because of their stupid rootkit practices and will hesitate to buy any legal game in the future, too.

AJ Rimmer Bsc.Ssc.
6th Aug 2006, 17:37
Hi all!

After some investigation I found a way how to completly remove Securom from my PC. Here is it:
1. stop UAService7 service (CTRL+ALT+DEL, find it and kill it)
2. using e.g. Autoruns (http://www.sysinternals.com/Utilities/Autoruns.html) remove this service and delete the file \windows\system32\UAService7.exe
3. delete the folder Documents and Settings\<your_user_name>\Application Data\SecuROM
4. delete the folder Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data\SecuROM; in case of any deletion problems use DelInvFile tool
(http://www.purgeie.com/delinv.htm).
5. delete securom registry keys using regedit
6. key named HKLM\SOFTWARE\SecuROM\!CAUTION! NEVER DELETE OR CHANGE ANY KEY* contains embedded nulls and cannot be removed using regedit; use e.g. RegDelNull tool (http://www.sysinternals.com/Utilities/RegDelNull.html) instead of it.

That's all. Now you can just ask why your game distributor uses techniques common for viruses and trojan horses. I state that starting from today I will never purchase anything from Sony because of their stupid rootkit practices and will hesitate to buy any legal game in the future, too.

anti virus beeping when installing a game demo ???

i was shocked

i think,"well may as well allow it,its from a games company."

play the demo and uninstall it,anti virus is still screaming that something spurious has happened to my registry.

after a long search i find "secuROM" undeletable even though the game demo is gone ????

your method above was the only way to get this thing off my PC and stop the anti virus shouting at me that i was an idiot to allow something to "put my system at risk"

many many thanks.
many many many thanks

Gnawbie
7th Jan 2007, 02:07
Im getting: A null context handle was passed from the client to the host during a remote procedure call. after trying to remove the secuROM key with RegDelNull, any suggestions?

jcapslock
10th Mar 2007, 10:02
Ditto. I am also getting A null context handle was passed from the client to the host during a remote procedure call. after trying to remove the secuROM key with RegDelNull.

Seems like securom is out to keep itself installed.

I have seen reports that securom shuts down popular sysinternals monitoring tools like regmon that people use to discover what is causing strange behavior. I think that is what it is doing with RegDelNull. I also saw something very disturbing. Several people recommended rebooting to safe mode to try to delete the files and my machine stayed in safe mode for about 10 seconds before rebooting automatically. I believe this to be securom going way over the line in protecting itself. That is malware in my opinion. These are the same tactics that several of the worst spyware and viruses use. Safe mode is sort of important for other purposes thank you very much.

Further, I believe they must have released a new version. The one I have does not have an easy UAservice7 service to delete. Instead it looks like it uses a driver. If you use freeware autoruns tool and go to the driver tab you will spot it quite easily. I believe it was called secdisc and I think that the path included securom in it which is how I identified it for sure. I unchecked it, then right clicked and deleted. Your mileage may vary of course.

To get rid of the garbage files in the documents and settings\username\application data\securom folder I had to use freeware unlocker assistant. You run it then go right click on the files in windows explorer and there is a special menu item for unlocker. You can choose to delete and it actually works where killbox and other tools would not. Even when choosing to delete the file on reboot using killbox, it would pop up a dialog saying that something removed the commands to delete on reboot.

I still cannot get rid of the registry entries though. Was hoping there was some alternative registry editor that would do the trick, but so far just see suggestion for the sysinternal tool that replaces nulls which does not work.

Any one have any ideas? I understand the need to protect intellectual property, but I think this kind of crap is not the answer. I bought the game and I resent having little gremlins that get left behind when I uninstall it.

I find it disheartening that so many people are defending this behavior and pointing to the EULA. And telling people they should be happy to have MALWARE running on their systems long after the game has been uninstalled. When I am reading the EULA I have opened the software and no store will take it back.

michiganfan
24th Aug 2007, 14:53
I find it disheartening that so many people are defending this behavior and pointing to the EULA. And telling people they should be happy to have MALWARE running on their systems long after the game has been uninstalled. When I am reading the EULA I have opened the software and no store will take it back.

This, precisely, is why all EULAs are not, and can not be a legally binding agreement between the two parties. The EULA was introduced AFTER the transaction had occurred. The purchaser was never made aware of this "agreement" at the time of purchase, never had a chance to refuse this "agreement" at the time of purchase, and never agreed to this "agreement" as part of the purchase.

EULAs introduced after the purchase can not be legally binding, EVER!

abrucewebb
7th Sep 2007, 03:41
I haven't tried it, but I read in another forum that a program called trashreg will delete the null registry entries.

Google trashreg and you can find the download.

vlad_tepes
15th May 2008, 14:16
I would like to know, as well. I just e-mailed SecuROM, asking them for assistance. As someone who can't stand to even leave games installed when he's not playing them, I hate hate hate having unnecessary services installed on my computer that I cannot remove.

how about an uninstaller guys? i managed to get them to give it to me. had to twist a few arms though. but here it is.


Hello.

Please start the SecuROM Uninstaller tool with the parameter /fulluninstall, afterwards everything should be removed.
Please find below the instructions:

http://www.securom.com/support/SecuROM_Uninstaller.zip

Please download it, extract the application file and follow the instructions below:

- The easiest way of using this tool is to copy the SecuROM_Uninstaller.exe file into your C:\ directory.

- Open the Windows command box by pressing <Start> and selecting the <Run...> option. Now type 'cmd' (without 's) and press <Enter> on the keyboard.

- Type: 'cd\' (without 's) and press <Enter> on the keyboard.

- Please type now: SecuROM_Uninstaller.exe /fulluninstall

- A dialog box will appear. To start the SecuROM uninstallation, press the <OK> button.

Please understand that any application that uses SecuROM will rebuild these files and folders with future launches.

p.s. i had securom 7.0 and it works. im not sure about later or prior versions. maybe someone can try it and let everyone know what version you have and if it worked or not.

Clayton
8th Sep 2008, 22:05
Sheesh that's invasive!

Sad. It looked like a fun game, but there are other games out there anyway and I should spend my time doing more productive things anyway.
I'll pass on this game and be sure to avoid Securom games in the future.

Thanks for the informative thread.

riccash
9th Jan 2009, 10:51
Stumbled upon this page. Just recently tried to uninstall Bioshock from my system and my virus scan is freaking out as well about the SecuROM reg key. Glad the user posted the uninstaller link.

I hope that developers understand in the future, that resorting to hacker tactics to secure their games will result in a massive fine and potential imprisonment from the U.S. Justice Department. Employing this kind of software, even with the intent of product security, breaks clearly defined laws from the NIPC. Employing code, that elevates administration rights for any process, where administrative rights are not rightly given, opens the door for other code to intrude on the machine.

Most people in the world may not realize it, but there is a constant war that is being waged in cyberspace on a daily basis between countries. If a federal machine had this kind of code installed on it, and a federal machine was opened to attack, despite the user not having administrative privileges on their machine, I can guarantee that someone would be facing the man.

Be smarter with securing your games. EA's Spore model seems to have worked. No install without an internet based account. No game load without login via the internet. Only 5 installs per registered key.

Clayton
9th Jan 2009, 15:17
Thanks for that bit of info Riccash.
I'd never heard of the NIPC before.
Apparently it stands for
National Infrastructure Protection Center (http://www.espionageinfo.com/Gu-In/Infrastructure-Protection-Center-NIPC-United-States-National.html).

I'm not fan of the Spore model either.
I bought it and when I found how it's scheme worked I took it back and got a refund.
It said on the box it requires an internet connection to play the game even though it can be an offline game, but I never saw the box until I got home. Just asked for the game and the guy at the counter bagged it and off I went.

"Phoning home" using the internet is absolutely rampant in software these days and that bothers me as much as privledge elevation, especially when it's required. That means that software, which already pretty much has the run of your PC, could export data off of it and could function as a backdoor, if ever an auto-update put that functionality in place.
When they throw in restrictions on it, like limited installs, that's extra horrible.