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View Full Version : Computer games 'can help children learn'



MissLara2U
27th Oct 2004, 00:38
The tomb-raiding exploits of Lara Croft or the adventures of the cuddly ogre Shrek can help children's social and educational development, according to researchers calling for computer games to be part of the school curriculum.
Far from being an obesity-inducing, violence-promoting threat to society, as they are often portrayed, the games being played in bedrooms across the country during half term can be used in the classroom to help children learn concepts such as critical appreciation of narrative structure or character development which they might otherwise study in a novel, say academics at London University's Institute of Education.

Research into games, conducted by the institute's Centre for the Study of Children, Youth and Media and partly funded by the Department for Trade and Industry, also suggests youngsters could develop their literacy skills by writing games programmes as well as studying existing ones.

MORE OF THIS HERE (http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,3604,1336750,00.html)

M.

www.tombraiderchronicles.com
www.tombraiderforums.com

whitemetal
28th Oct 2004, 14:23
It's so true, number 3 son wanted so much to play with his older brother on the C64 (Ah! for those that are to young.....that's Commodore 64 ) he learnt to read the keys. At first it was to be able to type his name as user data in games and later to load the games, that was nine years ago he is now 12 and one very cool nerd who reads and comprehends far beyond his peers and has a passion for maths and PS2 (side effect). I do believe he got his basic skills from playing PC games of which most were educational titles but he played his fair share of standard games and we did encourage him, not many kids read and type at 3 years old .

midroth
28th Oct 2004, 14:35
Can...can. But often (to often) enough they just play games, surf the net, or downloading pirated stuff (music, programs, DVDs a.s.o.).

richie87
28th Oct 2004, 19:06
yes but whilst downloading dont forget they have to navigate their way to the pirate copies by reading the web pages and sub-headings!;)
misslara knows all, like a psychic! you do know all of your current lara affairs though dont u? just where do you all this from i read bout this one in a newspaper

midroth
28th Oct 2004, 21:07
@richie87: SUN, Times, Dayly? :D

Jorge22
28th Oct 2004, 22:16
i still think reading novels would be far more educational whilst I believe there's a place for computer games. They're just different stuff and I don't see how a game could ever replace a book.
Now, the future will be full 3D games, no liquid crystal glasses on or anything, and probably educational programs or aiding programs for doctors (namely psychatrists) and much more. It's still not here but it will come. Will that ever replace books? You can't replace books. And the day books die, I'm telling you, that will truly be a benchmark of the Western hemisphere's decadence...

whitemetal
29th Oct 2004, 13:24
Books will never die ! But would you rather play a game that involves maths proplems or read a maths book? Which would you be more likely to do more than once, play the game or read the book?

Jorge22
30th Oct 2004, 15:18
Play the game, naturally... :) At least if it did the same for me as the book.

EddyBones
30th Oct 2004, 15:57
Originally posted by MissLara2U
...the games being played in bedrooms across the country during half term can be used in the classroom to help children learn concepts such as critical appreciation of narrative structure or character development which they might otherwise study in a novel...
I highly doubt that. In video games you get a vague idea of character growth, but a game usually is not based solely on that. A lot of books, on the other hand, are completely based on that. And if I had a kid I'd rather have him or her reading rather than playing video games. I wouldn't mind if they played once in a while like I do, but I wouldn't want that in school. Seems like it would be more of a distration than a learning experience even if they are deemed "educational."

The only way to have a child that reads seems to be not buying them a video game console until they're 12 or 13. Hey, it worked on me:D

jso2897
1st Nov 2004, 23:49
Getting thumped repeatedly on the head can "help children learn". That doesn't make it a good thing.:D

projo
2nd Nov 2004, 13:41
I'm sorry, but I disagree with those experts.
The current state of Computer Games leaves much to be desired in the way of education. Not that it couldn't change, but to do that would cost a lot more than people would be willing to pay.

The real classroom will remain where it always was, in the mind of each and every learner. While a computer game approaches a direct experience, the density of information limits it to only simple concepts. A book, and specifically a textbook, contains not only massive amounts of information, but its structure is random access and much more able to provide facts in millions of possible formats.