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theBlackman
10th Oct 2002, 17:26
ROTFL

You thought 2002 was rough.

This is a real headline on a newspaper article today.

2003 year to be "Jump-Started" at auto show.

Not even here yet, and 2003 has a dead battery.

Gumdrop
10th Oct 2002, 18:29
Originally posted by theBlackman
I love idiomatic English

Thanks Blackie. I have a little cruise control switch on both left and right sides of the brain, so no matter which part I happen to be caught up in, I can just think the switch on and away I go...automatic idiocy with little or no thaug... :eek: :confused:

theBlackman
10th Oct 2002, 20:46
Originally posted by Gumdrop


Thanks Blackie. I have a little cruise control switch on both left and right sides of the brain, so no matter which part I happen to be caught up in, I can just think the switch on and away I go...automatic idiocy with little or no thaug... :eek: :confused:

LOL Ricknmel, where are you when a fellow taffer needs you?


Main Entry: id·i·om
Pronunciation: 'i-dE-&m
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle French & Late Latin; Middle French idiome, from Late Latin idioma individual peculiarity of language, from Greek idiOmat-, idiOma, from idiousthai to appropriate, from idios
Date: 1588
1 a : the language peculiar to a people or to a district, community, or class : DIALECT b : the syntactical, grammatical, or structural form peculiar to a language
2 : an expression in the usage of a language that is peculiar to itself either grammatically (as no, it wasn't me) or in having a meaning that cannot be derived from the conjoined meanings of its elements (as Monday week for "the Monday a week after next Monday")
3 : a style or form of artistic expression that is characteristic of an individual, a period or movement, or a medium or instrument <the modern jazz idiom>; broadly : MANNER, STYLE <a new culinary idiom>

clayman
11th Oct 2002, 00:02
Yar ! :D

idio-, meaning; idiot-in-waiting. :D

Bleh. :D ;)

Bat-mite
11th Oct 2002, 20:14
There's a classic goof in the Beatles tune "Anna (Go to Him)" (which they didn't write).

In one verse, Lennon sings,

You say he loves you more than me,
So I will set you free.
Go wth him.

Now, look at the object pronoun "me" as used with the comparator "than." When using a comparator, the nouns on each side must be of the same case. Since the verb is implied, it is not necessary for it to be on both sides.

Humans, however, have no clue as to this grammatical construct, and butcher it frequently. For instance, it is incorrect to say "You are older than me." The correct sentence is "You are older than I."

Why? Because of the implied verb and the subject case. Add in the implied verb ("to be") to get:

"You are older than I (am)." correct

"You are older than me (am)." incorrect

But in the case of the song, we have two possible interpretations of the sentence, and both are correct grammatically, but with different meanings. By saying "He loves you more than me," the implied subject and verb could be "I love" or "he loves."

Example: "He loves you more than I (love you)." Or, "He loves you more than (he loves) me."

Therefore, "He loves you more than me" is grammatically correct. But what it means is, "He loves you more than he loves me," which is obviously not what the composer intended. The intended sentence was "He loves you more than I (love you)."

;)

Okay, I'll stop now.

yubetcha
11th Oct 2002, 20:32
It's truly refreshing that grammar isn't dead. Too many people butcher the language.

Peter_Smith
12th Oct 2002, 00:32
Re: "But in the case of the song, we have two possible interpretations of the sentence, and both are correct grammatically..."

At the risk of being more pedantic than Bat-mite, I have to add my two cents worth. First, I think that, although there are two possible interpretations, only one is gramatically correct ("He loves you more than (he loves) me."). When I read the line, I immediately took the only correct interpretation and assumed that the speaker was female or gay.;)

You could argue that that is not a plausible intent, but it is not so obvious to me.:)

Northren
12th Oct 2002, 01:33
I think forums are a perfect place for idiomatic english or language for that matter. Communication is more than the written word for the most part unless of course you are an author. The written word can lack many characteristics from body language and knowing the writer's background. I know I've said (or typed) some statements on this board that I wasn't exactly proud of :(. (dangling preposition.... so sue me. ;) ) But what the hey... I'm human.... well, at least I think I am... :)

Just a general ramble this Friday evening, like most days *sigh*

The above is a perfect example of idiomatic english.

:D

theBlackman
12th Oct 2002, 02:17
Originally posted by Northren
I think forums are a perfect place for idiomatic english..

*

The above is a perfect example of idioTmatic english.

:D

:D :D :p

BmanRogue
12th Oct 2002, 04:03
I couldn't more agree with them that I agree with than not. A perfect example of the idiomatic ramblings or some such manor for which an excuse need hardly apply thus, I drink therefore I am.
My elloquence wax abruptly to save the morrow, lest a less than potent taste of victory or the stout stench a wench once left upon me post prevail.

Ah yes, English... how missused it are by the less edumacated as the idiomatic solitare of the lonely verbages on.

:p B

RicknMel
12th Oct 2002, 04:38
You took the words right outta my mouth Bman! I coudln't have said it any better myself....no matter how drunk I was! :D