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fenpeppertree
22nd Nov 2016, 01:11
I just purchased the Rise of the Tomb Raider 20 Year Celebration for PC game from a place called CDKeys.com for $25.99.

It took a very long time to download, overnight and then I don't know after noon some time maybe, it got done.

Lara is moving very slowly compared to gameplay videos I've watched on YouTube.

I tried turning DirectX 12 on and changing the FXX whatever thing to SM whatever x4, but I got pop up messages saying the options chosen were taxing or not complying with the computer, or something to that effect. I went back and changed them to what they had been. Either way it made no difference.

The audio is good, no lag or anything, it is just that Lara moves too slowly.

Is there anything I could do to adjust this?

I'm using an Asus 13.3" Intel i3 1.9 GHz 4 GB Ram Windows 8.1 notebook that has been upgraded to Windows 10 and then Windows 10 Anniversary Update.

Metalrocks
22nd Nov 2016, 13:14
maybe you should check the recommended settings to play the game.
OS: Windows 7 64bit
Processor: Intel Core i3-2100 or AMD equivalent
Memory: 6 GB RAM
Graphics: NVIDIA GTX 650 2GB or AMD HD7770 2GB
DirectX: Version 11
Storage: 25 GB available space

so maybe more ram and better gpu could help. in other words: you need a better machine.

abernathy2
26th Nov 2016, 15:29
I just purchased the Rise of the Tomb Raider 20 Year Celebration for PC game from a place called CDKeys.com for $25.99.

It took a very long time to download, overnight and then I don't know after noon some time maybe, it got done.

Lara is moving very slowly compared to gameplay videos I've watched on YouTube.

I tried turning DirectX 12 on and changing the FXX whatever thing to SM whatever x4, but I got pop up messages saying the options chosen were taxing or not complying with the computer, or something to that effect. I went back and changed them to what they had been. Either way it made no difference.

The audio is good, no lag or anything, it is just that Lara moves too slowly.

Is there anything I could do to adjust this?

I'm using an Asus 13.3" Intel i3 1.9 GHz 4 GB Ram Windows 8.1 notebook that has been upgraded to Windows 10 and then Windows 10 Anniversary Update.
Even qn gtx 550,an old model ,If play at low,is running pretty good,so change the video board

fenpeppertree
27th Nov 2016, 03:11
I have been checking on my computer's system information, and this is what I've come up with:

http://i.imgur.com/Sw5bST3.png


http://i.imgur.com/M6hjRua.png


http://i.imgur.com/nyHGOw2.png

These images tell the tale. I think everything is ok, except maybe the graphics.

I have about 67 GB of 'space', and I assume the requirement for Direct X 11 refers to minimum version, so that anything above 11 would be ok. The same with the Windows 7 requirement, I guess Windows 10 would be ok.

So, it really just leaves the Graphics. Does anyone know what my graphics is, compared to the required:
"NVIDIA GTX 650 2GB or AMD HD7770 2GB." Bad, Solid, Mediocre, or just plain Terrible.

pengtuck
28th Nov 2016, 05:31
Unfortunately in the pecking order it is at the bottom of the barrel, even in this incomplete list (http://www.videocardbenchmark.net/gpu.php?gpu=Intel+HD+4000).

You're not going to have a good time with it.

Some good news, at this juncture in time there's a few cards and CPU's that get thrown around for paper launches for the next year. This almost guarantees the existing products will have a price cut of sorts. Could be your opportunity to build a modestly priced desktop to run at 1080p.

abernathy2
28th Nov 2016, 07:15
Even qn gtx 550,an old model ,If play at low,is running pretty good,so change the video board

You have to make an upgrade to the ram memory,at least
4gb,with this upgrade You should play IT very well

fenpeppertree
29th Nov 2016, 18:09
I had no problem with TOMB RAIDER 2013 on this machine, so what is the difference?


TOMB RAIDER 2013 REQUIREMENTS:

Minimum system requirements for PC
Windows XP Service Pack 3, Windows Vista,7,8 (32bit/64bit)
DirectX 9 graphics card with 512Mb Video RAM: - AMD Radeon HD 2600 XT. - nVidia 8600.
Dual core CPU: - AMD Athlon64 X2 2.1 Ghz (4050+) - Intel Core2 Duo 1.86 Ghz (E6300)
1GB Memory (2GB on Vista)


RISE OF THE TOMB RAIDER REQUIREMENTS:

Graphics: NVIDIA GTX 650 2GB or AMD HD7770 2GB

Could it be the graphics? Is the 512 MB mentioned for TOMB RAIDER 2013 the equivalent requirement to the 2GB mentioned for the RISE OF THE TOMB RAIDER?

pengtuck
29th Nov 2016, 23:32
You're playing it on a notebook not really designed for gaming. ROTR is way more demanding than 2013.

Games don't necessarily have the same workloads between sequels. Expect differences and if you were scraping barely meeting minimum requirements you are not going to have a good time.

AdobeArtist
30th Nov 2016, 18:16
Hate to say it, but you're notebook is far too underpowered to be playing this game, hence the slow performance. The fact that the game is running at all is a consolation, but not much of one. Now while you might be able to increase your RAM, the limitations of a notebook means you can't upgrade the GPU which is where the primary bottleneck is. And that integrated Intel chip is a poor substitute for a dedicated graphics card, even an entry level model offered by either Nvidia and AMD.

fenpeppertree
1st Dec 2016, 14:09
Thanks for the input from everyone. I still do not want to go any bigger than a 13.3" notebook, so I am thinking of trying an Alienware 13 gaming notebook. Any thoughts, pro/con, on that idea?

AdobeArtist
1st Dec 2016, 14:46
I'm curious to know what your requirements are for a notebook so small. I'm sure you have your reasons that mobility is needed for your other applications outside of gaming. Even so there are laptops with bigger screens that afford better productivity. I suppose I am biased in this; aside from having a general distaste for laptops (always going with desktop), I'd just hate to have my gaming experiences confined to so small a display. I just recently this Black Friday got a 29" Ultrawide monitor (21:9 aspect) and let me tell you, it is spectacular for gaming immersion with it's wide field of view, plus a real boost in real estate productivity for the Adobe apps I use on a regular basis.

But anyway, as far as Alienware goes; it's my general opinion that they way overcharge for their products, reeling in the uninformed consumer with their branding/marketing as a "gaming machine" as what's "needed" for having a gaming capable PC. I'm sure you can find other perfectly suitable notebooks with comparable specs at more reasonable prices among the numerous brands such as ASUS, MSI, EVGA, Lenovo, HP, etc...

The thing to look at first and foremost is the specs. What's under the hood is all the same regardless of the logo on the outside. And to that some general recommendations;

* try to go for at least an i5
* 8 GB or more RAM (16 GB can be expensive in a notebook, but you can find 12 GB models for price to performance balance)
* not sure if the GTX 10 series is in notebooks yet, but something in the 900 m series, at least a 960, but higher if you can, try to get 4 GB GDDR5
* a lot of notebooks use SSD's for a slim form factor, and while they are faster, they come at a cost of storage space. And games take up a LOT of space so be sure to go for a mechanical drive with a good terabyte count

Basically what ever is the best you can squeeze out of your laptop budget, and see which of the brands offer that at the best price, pound for pound.

Metalrocks
1st Dec 2016, 15:36
what adobe said.
just getting one will not do the trick. if you do not check the specs of the machine, you pretty much lose not only money, but also the ability to play games properly.

i personally never cut down on money when it comes to a good gaming machine. in my case desktop. i do a lot of research before i buy my next gaming rig. and with gaming rig, i mean that i buy each part individually. CPU, GPU, motherboard, RAM, CPU fan. even a tower if needed.
if you do not know how to build a pc together, then let someone else you know do it for you. that way you know you have something good that will last for a long time. just getting something because the price is right, does not mean you save money if you are forced to buy one again after a year or even less. these pre build ones are mostly a rip off, as adobe nicely explained. not enough RAM and a rather average GPU and/or CPU that may not keep up with some games.

notebooks are really not the greatest for gaming so better spend money on a desktop and keep the laptop for what ever purpose you need it for.
i know when i have looked for a laptop, which i just needed for study and work purpose, i also looked at these gaming laptops (out of curiosity) like from alien, or even ASUS. the specs werent as close to my desktop rig and even costed way more. one ASUS costed twice as much as my much powerful rig.

and as adobe pointed out as well: getting/having a bigger screen. just confine your self to a small screen sounds rather boring and takes away the immersion of the game. also the sound is important too. laptops dont have great speakers, knowing that you can get a headset with 7.1 surround sound, sounds more appealing to me.

also check the specs of the games as well. i guess you did not really look at them and looked up if its compatible with your notebook. as you have seen, your rig is rather low compared what the game requires to play it smoothly.

Mike_B
1st Dec 2016, 15:52
I also do my gaming on a desktop (self picked the parts) pc but since you are looking for a laptop I pretty much agree with what has been said above by Adobe & Metalrocks.

The most marketed brands for Gaming a Razer and Alienware and they both seem to be overpriced. The most important thing you have to remember when gaming on a laptop is that heat is your enemy. You can buy the most expensive laptop but in the end you are limited by how the heat is dispensed. If your laptops gets too hot it will slow down or throttle as it's called and your performance will suffer. So if you do buy a gaming laptop keep that in mind and do plenty of searching on line on user experience, some gaming models are especially bad at this despite costing a premium.

Agree with the i5 recommendation although I believe on mobile they are sometimes dual core instead of quad core. Intel uses different suffices on their mobile chips, some chips are aimed specifically for low energy cost for example so they are slower despite having the same clockspeed. Regarding graphics card I've seen that MSI already has laptops with the 10xx series so I'm sure other manufacturers have those as well.

I would suggest getting a device with an SSD though. If you are buying a new machine these days there's really no reason not to. If you want a large enough one to store your games on it's going to be costly so I'd think it's best to have a 256 or 512 GB main SSD drive for the OS and other programs and search for a laptop that has a second mechanical drive for your games.

Are you going to use your laptop for anything else than gaming?
I'd like to point out that I've never had a gaming laptop so can't share more experiences other than general concepts.

Metalrocks
1st Dec 2016, 16:02
oh yes, heat is certainly an important factor here. because its so compact, it easily gets very hot in there. especially if the game requires a lot of power. this problem you wont have with a desktop since its more opener with better airflow and you can build in a better fan too that can cool of the CPU more effectively.
i personally do not use the standard fan of the CPU since it could not keep up with some games and me living in a hot environment.

Mike_B
1st Dec 2016, 16:16
Ah yes didn't even think of a living in a hot environment, that's an extra factor. I've always been able to use the stock intel cooler without issues but it doesn't get as hot here.

I did a quick look on dell's site regarding the Alienware 13 and actually the basics of the model it looks like they have a reasonable price now with decent specs. Also seems like there are mobile i5 that are quadcore as well.

AdobeArtist
1st Dec 2016, 18:20
I would suggest getting a device with an SSD though. If you are buying a new machine these days there's really no reason not to. If you want a large enough one to store your games on it's going to be costly so I'd think it's best to have a 256 or 512 GB main SSD drive for the OS and other programs and search for a laptop that has a second mechanical drive for your games.



The reason I recommended a traditional mechanical HDD is the storage limitations of SSD. And where having only a single drive is an option, storage becomes more important than speed. On a side note, do many laptops really come with both an SSD and HDD? I always saw the ones that are SDD to trim down the profile, considering the aesthetics over the specs, and again at the cost of mass storage capacity.

But even if a dual drive laptop is an option, it brings up the cost factor. Same as with having a desktop for gaming separate from a notebook for work (or what ever projects) on the go. These are considerations only our friend here can answer. I'm going with a baseline recommendation approach with the flexibility to try and respect his operating budget as much as possible.

Metalrocks
2nd Dec 2016, 01:07
The reason I recommended a traditional mechanical HDD is the storage limitations of SSD. And where having only a single drive is an option, storage becomes more important than speed. On a side note, do many laptops really come with both an SSD and HDD? I always saw the ones that are SDD to trim down the profile, considering the aesthetics over the specs, and again at the cost of mass storage capacity.

But even if a dual drive laptop is an option, it brings up the cost factor. Same as with having a desktop for gaming separate from a notebook for work (or what ever projects) on the go. These are considerations only our friend here can answer. I'm going with a baseline recommendation approach with the flexibility to try and respect his operating budget as much as possible.

when i was at uni, our lecturer told us that laptops/notebooks only have SSD drives because of none moving parts. after all, a laptop is designed be carried around while with a magnetic HDD this is not the case. also the space is a factor too.

at this stage he hasnt given us any price limit. depends also in what country he lives in. only he prefers a notebook and wants to have a small sized screen. which for me means he carries it around a lot. only this i would not recommend since rise does require a lot of power to run and would drain the battery quickly too.


Ah yes didn't even think of a living in a hot environment, that's an extra factor. I've always been able to use the stock intel cooler without issues but it doesn't get as hot here.


where i live, its always hot. constantly in the 30 degree area (celsius). its a tropical environment so of course i have to consider a good cooling system. thats why i have gotten a good tower as well were the heat can escape properly. especially since my GPU can run really hot with some games.
but the funny thing is, even when i lived in hong kong and it was winter (gets below 10 degree), i had struggle to play assassins creed 4 smoothly. i was certainly over the recommended requirements, and yet the game was stuttering when i was in a town/city. looking at the floor/sky ran smoothly again but not when looking straight.
"bad pc port" you think at first, but in technical forums they have told me that the CPU gets really hot. i have always used the standard intel fans but looks like i had to find something else. so i was recommended to get a pipe cooler. so i have currently this one here.
http://www.deepcool.com/product/cpucooler/2013-12/7_481.shtml

im really happy with it. huge difference in temperature. also much quieter. and the best part is: its much easier to clean. no dust gets really caught in to it and most importantly even; not a single dust flake lands on the CPU, creating unnecessary heat.

pengtuck
2nd Dec 2016, 09:40
Thanks for the input from everyone. I still do not want to go any bigger than a 13.3" notebook, so I am thinking of trying an Alienware 13 gaming notebook. Any thoughts, pro/con, on that idea?

If you have to get a Alienware, go for the Alienware 15 but don't get the old one. Get the new one. The new ones have a nice looking external housing, re-designed cooling and one of the newer GPU's (1060-1070).

It's a very capable laptop but as someone else mentioned in the thread they can cost quite a fair bit.

Mike_B
2nd Dec 2016, 14:16
The reason I recommended a traditional mechanical HDD is the storage limitations of SSD. And where having only a single drive is an option, storage becomes more important than speed. On a side note, do many laptops really come with both an SSD and HDD? I always saw the ones that are SDD to trim down the profile, considering the aesthetics over the specs, and again at the cost of mass storage capacity.

But even if a dual drive laptop is an option, it brings up the cost factor. Same as with having a desktop for gaming separate from a notebook for work (or what ever projects) on the go. These are considerations only our friend here can answer. I'm going with a baseline recommendation approach with the flexibility to try and respect his operating budget as much as possible.

I can understand where you are coming from with your recommendation. I guess I just feel that if you buy something new today a SSD is a must as it has basically surpassed *more RAM* as the main performance boost. Especially for laptops as most mechanical drives are 5400 RPM vs 7200 or 10.000 on the desktop counterparts. Large SSD's are still pricey though I agree.

I did a quick look and for both ASUS and MSI's gaming line-up it looks common enough to have both a smaller ssd (128 to 256 GB) with an additional mechanical HDD. That's for the 15" and up, for a 13" I don't think there's a lot of choice out there.

fenpeppertree
3rd Dec 2016, 06:08
Not to break into the 'techie' talk, but whoa, I am like the Noobie with a new game that does not seem to work on a machine that I just used to play Tomb Raider 2013.

About SSD drives, I have a Samsung 850 EVO 500GB 2.5-Inch SATA III Internal SSD that I bought almost a year ago for about $210. I see now though, that Amazon has got it for about $160.

I know games take up a lot of space, but to me, there is only one game in the world that shows any merit, and that is Tomb Raider. Actually, I think it is going from 'possible' to 'join the club'. In other words, the Tomb Raider Trilogy series, 2006, 2007, and 2008, were 'possible', but then came Tomb Raider 2013, 'join the club' combat. Now I am 'throttling' mercenaries, when before it seemed I was finding lost artifacts, revealing hidden phenomena, and battling, at times (which isn't what I like best of my gaming experience) mythical or fantasy-based creatures. Of course, there are the 'bad guys', but not in the same sense of the word, they're less 'prominent' for lack of a better word. I can do without any of the combat, maybe a 'Boss' battle (I don't know), but I like a more easy-going experience with the goal progression stemming from puzzle solving, not combat experience and kills acquired. I just don't like that part of gaming. I know I don't fit the gamer profile of today's gamer, but "life is but to dream". Ha Ha
I know these combat games seem to be wildly popular, but not for me. They all remind me of the simple "Fate" series of games that I have purchased at Wild Tangent Games; you walk along till you encounter a gaggle of monsters to annihilate, sometimes you overcome the odds, and sometimes it is totally impossible, so you need to upgrade your armor, your strength, your magic, whatever.
The trilogy series with the 3rd person format, which is the only format I like, has some puzzling and when you figure out this or that maybe you progress. In other words, these games are a lot more interesting to me.

Sorry, I didn't mean to rant on. Back to topic. Does anyone have any thoughts on the 3200 x 1800 screen resolution?

Metalrocks
3rd Dec 2016, 13:16
only because you could play TR 2013 on it, doesnt mean the next title few years later will. thats why we try to explain why its better to do some research for a better rig instead of just getting one that has a good price.

and dont worry, you are not the only one here who thinks TR should cut back on the combat.

if you want to play at 3000x1800, you really need a very good GPU that can handle this and a monitor that can go that high up. but they arent very cheap. so in this case you are looking at a desktop computer since a laptop can not support it. now most new GPUs can go that high, so i think you wont be having much trouble finding one. again, it depends what brand and money you are looking at.

i personally are very happy with 1920x1080 since it still looks clear and can have all the effects switched to max without any problems. because the GPU does consume a lot of power that requires a good power supply and a motherboard that can support your card.

fenpeppertree
3rd Dec 2016, 16:22
To everyone still on site, I have decided, after reading this article titled:The complete list of laptops with Nvidia GTX 1070 and GTX 1080 graphics,
and especially after reading this line: "While details are still scarce for now, you should expect the mobile Pascal solutions to be 40 to 180% faster than the Maxwell mobile chips (GTX 970M and 980M), and only about 5-10% slower than their desktop counterparts"

http://www.ultrabookreview.com/10939-laptops-nvidia-1070-1080/

that I am going to wait for laptops to upgrade to the Nvidia Pascal graphics chips, and then see where things are.

Thanks to everyone.

Metalrocks
4th Dec 2016, 00:28
good for you and that we were some help to you. i hope once its out that it will last for a long time and you can enjoy all the games you want on it.

pengtuck
4th Dec 2016, 10:44
To everyone still on site, I have decided, after reading this article titled:The complete list of laptops with Nvidia GTX 1070 and GTX 1080 graphics,
and especially after reading this line: "While details are still scarce for now, you should expect the mobile Pascal solutions to be 40 to 180% faster than the Maxwell mobile chips (GTX 970M and 980M), and only about 5-10% slower than their desktop counterparts"

http://www.ultrabookreview.com/10939-laptops-nvidia-1070-1080/

that I am going to wait for laptops to upgrade to the Nvidia Pascal graphics chips, and then see where things are.

Thanks to everyone.

Uh they are available now. Check MSI, Asus and the Alienware website :)

fenpeppertree
4th Dec 2016, 19:17
Uh really, where? :nut:

Here's the thing though, I have a few specs I will not sacrifice. Number 1, the most scarce, is a double whammy; I have to have a 13.3" screen size or maybe, I saw there are some Zenbooks at 12.5" or something, which would be better than fine, but they also have to have the 360 or flip-style design. I think this combination is impossible to find, and now with the new Nvidia Pascal graphics chip, I guess I can forget about it.

As for price, $2000 is not going to happen. I would rather not go over $1000, and that would be on an installment plan, soooo... my options keep dwindling.

AdobeArtist
4th Dec 2016, 22:31
I'm never one to question anybody's budget. It's your money and not ours, so we all have to respect that. But at the same time you should expect to be at a limited performance range given the cost/power ratio found in laptops. It won't be impossible to get a decent modern laptop in that price range, just go in with realistic expectations for the gaming performance; most likely a mix of Med and High. Which would still be an improvement over what you had before, and if lucky can still achieve above 40 fps.

What I'm most curious about is why your screen can't go above 13"? Would going at a mere 15" size really conflict with your standards that much? Because in most cases you can find relatively well spec'd out models (and still at a reasonable price) in that size class which can't be found in the more compact bodies of a 13". And that extra 2 inches is still very portable. So why such a constrained limitation?

Metalrocks
5th Dec 2016, 12:34
@adobe
im pretty sure is for transportation. thats why the screen size. my father also has a 13" screen and he is very happy with it since he doesnt want anything bigger. but he also doesnt play games.

@OP
well, i can understand why you dont want to pay that much, but if you ever want to enjoy future games, inclusive rise, you have to cash out more to get a good rig that can handle them. otherwise you will never be able to run games on medium or even on low.
what you are asking for is simple laptop that is good for surfing the net and operating MS office but thats it. you have reached its limits.

otherwise, do as i have suggested before, get a good desktop or laptop that can handle games and you use it only for games and use your 13" for what ever you use it for. you just torture your self and lose money when you try to get to your requirements.

AdobeArtist
5th Dec 2016, 16:10
lol, I KNOW that TC's decision is centered around mobility. That's the reason anyone chooses a laptop over a desktop. But in that regard, does 15" screen size (just a measly 2 inches) really make that much difference? Does it make it so much harder to carry around and use in the most cramped work spaces? I mean.... just how is 15" over 13" an issue? :scratch:

fenpeppertree
6th Dec 2016, 18:39
To put minds at rest as to why I will not settle for a 15" laptop, I will try to explain. I have had an Acer 15" laptop before, which has been about 5 years ago now, but I actually would prefer it over what is out today. It mainly has to do with the one-piece track pad that is on all laptops now; I can't use them. On the old-style, where the right-click and left-click buttons were separated from the tracking pad, I did not have a problem having more than one finger on the track pad and clicking buttons at the same time (like one finger on the left click button and one finger on the track pad). With the new version laptops, I have to keep only one finger on the track pad at a time (like one finger on/one finger off all the time).and I must say, I'm not good at it and I just don't like it. That is my main gripe with laptops of today, but just in general, I rarely sit at a table or desk, and 15" is just to big, heavy, and awkward to be comfortable and easy to use. I do not use my 13" in my lap either; I have a cantilever shelf next to my bed, and I keep it flipped back in a stand I made myself, then I use an air trackball clicker (sorry, I just hate to use the M-word) to do everything I need to do. Of course, if I'm playing TR I have a game controller I use. Lastly, I think laptops, like you say, are not quite like desktop "performance", I guess is the word.

Ok, I just tried using the track pad, and if I just use my right hand and keep my left hand completely off the track pad maybe it could work, I will try this method and see; but I rarely take it off the shelf, I just grab my portable keyboard from the drawer next to my bed, and it stays in the stand.

But I absolutely can't buy a laptop that is not at least a flip-style, or what I would really like, and I don't think it even exists, is one that does the 360 and also detaches, but like I said, I don't think they exist.

I am planning to get a better than fair desktop maybe some time in 2018; but not right now. once again though, I do not want to go over 19.5".

I'm thinking computers are all about "small", so why couldn't I even get a 13" desktop to set on my shelf next to my bed; just thinking.

pengtuck
9th Dec 2016, 23:56
Gaming on the go is not a cheap endeavor. You will pay a premium even if you are going with something like Clevo.
So you have several requirements or expectations that in unison rule out most laptops for you.

Computers come in all sorts of sizes, small -> really big.
I suppose you could be a candidate for the Nintendo Switch but then again if all you are ever going to see is first party Nintendo games then it might not suit you as well.

I'd go with building your own desktop - just set a baseline target performance and put in the parts to match.

Oh, here's a review of the Alienware 13. It's small, does 1080p but unfortunately quite pricey as well. Not available in all regions the 13 inch model

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dtjllca-AaQ

fenpeppertree
11th Dec 2016, 11:18
To even think about "building" my own desktop gaming computer is a little too geek-extraordinaire for me. I really just want to get a small compact notebook, preferably a 13.3"; which I guess is only available in the Alienware 13 line of gaming laptops.

Right now, I'm wondering if the devices listed as having the Nvidia GTX 1060, 1070, or 1080 are the only devices with the new Pascal GPU, or are there others.

I found another article touting the new Nvidia Pascal GPU titled "Don’t Buy a Gaming Laptop Without Pascal, Unless You Hate Yourself"
http://www.laptopmag.com/articles/should-you-buy-pascal-gaming-laptop


Thanks for the Alienware 13 link, still over my budget, really though. I think I am going to try to find a good Alienware 13 on Amazon at a "Used/Like New" or maybe "Used/Very Good" rating; then maybe I can get within my budget. Still thinking I should definitely buy a device with the Pascal GPU, though.

AdobeArtist
12th Dec 2016, 04:49
I'm sure you can get a 13/15" notebook with GTX 1060 (or 1070) at a far better price than Alienware, going with another brand such as ASUS, MSI, Lenovo, Acer, or Gigabyte. Like I said before, Alienware charges significantly more for having mostly the same internal components, only with the Alienware packaging, by means of branding their product as "gaming specialty PCs". It's a marketing tactic designed to lure in the susceptible consumer under the premise that a "regular PC" isn't good enough for gaming, that they need to spend more on theirs specifically. It's not too dissimilar from Apple packaging and branding that let's them justify selling their product at a premium. And let me tell you most experienced PC gamers consider Alienware a scam, even if going by a box model rather than a custom built rig.

fenpeppertree
12th Dec 2016, 19:37
Ok, but isn't MSI the same thing, a gaming laptop at comparable prices?

Never heard of Gigabyte, will check into.

I have decided I would really like to have not the 15", but the 13.3".

FHD (1080 x 1920)

I would like to get at least a 2.7 GHz processor, (especially since Assassins Creed III (2012) has a CPU requirement of 2.66 GHz; which I can barely/hardly believe), but all I ever seem to find is 2.6 GHz. I just got this game for free through a CNET Cheapskate deal, and in my opinion it does not quite compare to the Tomb Raider series, even though TR seems to have gone in a bad direction, in my opinion. I still haven't got very far in the game, so I should probably reserve my overall estimation of the game for later, I suppose. It really doesn't peak my interest or make me want to get back to it any time soon. Ha Ha

I am also wondering about Intel's Turbo Boost, and how that works. Does it work in a burst effect or does it sustain a 3.2 GHz 'boost' if gaming? Is it really worth having at all, or just more hype?

I would like a matte finish screen display.

And definitely the Nvidia Pascal GPU.

No one answered my question about the Nvidia Pascal GPU; are the GTX 1060, 1070, and 1080, the only Pascal GPUs I'm likely to find when looking for a laptop for gaming?

I found an article that said the best gaming laptop is the MSI Dominator Pro which is a 15", and it's priced around $1500, so over my budget, unless in 6 months or so I could get a 'used' device for less; and I would be willing to go with a 15" instead of the more compact 13.3", my ideal choice.

Battery life isn't very important to me, because I really never go "portable"; I'm always plugged in.

I really don't like that none of the "gaming" laptops have the 360 capability.

pengtuck
13th Dec 2016, 01:32
No one answered my question about the Nvidia Pascal GPU; are the GTX 1060, 1070, and 1080, the only Pascal GPUs I'm likely to find when looking for a laptop for gaming?
No. They are not the only ones but they are the newest non mobile GPU's available for laptops. You will find a range of Maxwell GPUs like the 980m, 960m etc... They are generally poorer value for mobile gaming since they have been gimped substantially to meet thermal and power requirements. The Pascal GPUs are better suited for mobile gaming since they address thermal and power requirements without too much compromises (mainly on max GPU and memory speed is a little lower). Occasionally you will see a few laptops with AMD, probably you will want to avoid these as well.


Battery life isn't very important to me, because I really never go "portable"; I'm always plugged in
Err so why bother with a laptop :D ? The budget and portability requirements are killing your desires :D


I really don't like that none of the "gaming" laptops have the 360 capability.
There are. They just have very high end specs and cost a lot. Dual 1080s etc... Here's a link
http://www.clevo.com.tw/clevo_prodetail.asp?id=950&lang=en
They are a OEM for a lot of manufacturers like Asus, MSI, Gigabyte, Origin PC etc.. . Not Dell/Alienware (which is a custom design).

fenpeppertree
13th Dec 2016, 13:24
Err so why bother with a laptop ? The budget and portability requirements are killing your desires

From what I'm gathering, and I've just started, mind you, very new to this; anything besides a laptop for gaming, meaning a desktop version, comes with a "tower". So, even though I stay plugged in, I still appreciate the ability to just pick up the device and set it somewhere else, if I would like to. It's kind of like comparing a cellphone with a refrigerator, just to over-exaggerate a bit. Yeah, it's mainly about small confined spaces. and not having to be chained to a desk.



There are. They just have very high end specs and cost a lot. Dual 1080s etc... Here's a link
http://www.clevo.com.tw/clevo_prodet...id=950&lang=en
They are a OEM for a lot of manufacturers like Asus, MSI, Gigabyte, Origin PC etc.. . Not Dell/Alienware (which is a custom design).


I don't understand the link given for the 360 capability, nothing there for 360 capability. I'm taking about the flip-style or convertible possibilities that enable tablet-mode, and tent-mode; which also, of course, always includes touch-screen capability.

pengtuck
14th Dec 2016, 01:06
I don't understand the link given for the 360 capability
Ok apparently neither do I since when you say 360 I think you mean VR. Anyway what you are asking for is (the flipping bit) is not something these laptops focus on.