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-Mono-
22nd Oct 2015, 00:47
So, like everyone here I've recently finished episode 5. It was one hell of a ride, but it's over. (Sadly)
And as I sat there watching the ending credits, I thought to myself "what was the underlining message here?"
Now, everything got a little fuzzy towards the end. Numerous timelines ended and the writing on the wall got mixed in with everything else going on.
So I sat there and went over this question. Trying to find an answer. And I couldn't, For the record I chose to save Chloe and sacrifice arcadia bay. (I'll get to why I chose this later)
But I couldn't think of a message that summarises the story and the journey as a whole. I thought, friendship? Love?
But then remembered that only the ending in which Chloe survives involves these two things.
So I started to think, why did I choose the ending I chose. I saw the statistics. The majority saved arcadia bay. And with good reason. But why didn't I?

And then it hit me. The underlining message is that there isn't a clear underlining message. Each player has their own unique message. The story is set out so you as a player create your own reasonings for each choice and in turn the end of the game. When given a choice both options have positives and negatives. It just depends on where your priorities are set.
My personal reasoning was because as soon as Chloe was introduced I connected with the character. She became a reason to do certain things, to replay situations to better her's and max's situation. And as the game progressed, this connection grew and grew until it essentially effected the outcome of the game.
So basically, my end goal was effected by the way I played through the game. Each decision that I went over twice or three times to ensure everything was right did in turn change the ending of the game for me.

I may have chosen the same ending as other players, but the reasoning behind my decisions and the way I felt about the whole situation was completely unique.

Feel free to post any thoughts/arguments on any topics I covered.

KristaD
22nd Oct 2015, 00:58
I think everyone has their own reasons for choosing what they did. I decided (with some difficulty) to go back in time and let Chloe die for some personal reasons, I didn't even consider allowing Chloe to live for a second.

Corinth
22nd Oct 2015, 00:59
What I learned from Life is Strange:

Doesn't matter what you choose, your choices really don't matter in the end run whatsoever.

I know I sound a little bitter here, but telling me "Choices Matter" and then giving me a multiple choice answer that's the same no matter what at the end kinda irks me a little.

I've seen plenty of games that have 10, 12, 13+ endings based upon what you did during the game... and to build a whole game around "Choices Matter" and "This action will have consequences..." which is displayed at the top of the screen several times an episode and have it all boil down to the same A or B endings is just... nngh.

I dunno how else to say it.

airetam2342
22nd Oct 2015, 03:14
A message that summarizes the story and the journey as a whole: The road to Hella is paved with good intentions.

a.k.a. this action will have consequences

It's pretty much all summed up by watering the plant. You give Lisa a drink and end up killing it because you thought you where helping.

The story is such a terrific allegory of this concept, I think at least. Consider Max at the beginning of the game. She's insecure, very critical, unassertive and needs some help in the self-esteem department. She's unsure and full of self-doubt. Over the course of events Max learns to take action and stop staying on the sidelines. She stops being an observer in life and starts to live, interacting and making a difference. Soon Max goes in an extreme direction though. She goes back in time to the day Chloe's dad, William, dies. She changes fate then rewrites time when she can't live with the outcomes. She does it again and again. All for a good cause, of course. I think the story is about Max and the audience learning that even if time can be rewound and new, alternate paths traveled, should you do it? How can you judge if one path is better than another? Don't both have faults as well as merits? How can you say one is more suitable?

Which is my interpretation as to why the game ends with an A or B decision. Max realizes that the more she tries to fix things, the more things fall into chaos. She finally comes to the realization that there is no escape from the consequences of life. Even if she ends up rewinding time and forestalling unsavory outcomes, it will get to the point where she's frozen in time. Which is how she was living at the game's beginning; too afraid to act and letting time pass her by.

Max faces the consequences of time meddling in both endings, each taking on a different form. I actually really like both endings. I can't really say which I like more. Maybe if Max sacrificed herself? I dunno.

Sacrificing Chloe is a consequence that mends the timeline through erasure. It's like tying a knot in a loose thread and preventing any unraveling.

Sacrificing Arcadia Bay is a consequence that lets time play out. Its like a built up static charge defusing.

I guess it's more radical to save Chloe. Tearing the butterfly photo in two drives in the point of accepting consequences and refusing to take the easy way out. Max wants to face the music. She made her bed and knows she's got to lie in it. However, Chloe being shot and killed is also pretty radical, too. I guess it's all very polarizing...heh. :D

MisterWind
22nd Oct 2015, 07:44
I thought the ending was thought provoking with a catch 22 moral dilemma, but it was ill fitting to how I connected with the rest of the game. I also don't think the ending benefitted the target audience, or the story as a whole.

This is what I got from the ending:

Max receives a power to alter situations/Choose who lives and dies throughout the story; so in a way, she's playing God- while innocently trying to do her best. Then she begins to struggle internally, realizing that no matter what she does, mistakes are made. The invisible question that arises is: Who has the right to decide who lives and dies? Whose to say it wasn't meant to be?
This struggle leaves Max with a moral dilemma to erase it all and go back to the start; Or stop using the power and let Chloe live, and let time settle itself out. (which brings it all the way back to her very first life-and-death decision. Strangely, it takes a giant loop) (But its contradictory if she saves Arcadia instead, because Max had to use her power to save Chloe, and now she's using it to let Chloe die.) (Also: who is to say the storm wasn't on its way all that time regardless of the choice..., ALSO: no matter what you choose, the rest of the game becomes circumstantial and a bit forgotten)

...The conclusion leaves a bitter, yet thought provoking struggle for the player-A topic that boarders a age old discussion: if everyone in the world was going to die, but you could only save 10 people to start the new world, who would it be? and why?

Now my final thoughts:

To me, the conclusion didn't match the rest of the story or impact me the same. It also, in my opinion, doesn't benefit the young adult audience, because nobody has that kind of time powers in real life. But, we do have the choices we make right now, and they have consequences, and they matter. Max's power gives you an insight on how choices effect you and others for good or bad...The game made you think about the moral decisions Max faced, and to be thoughtful and observant( are you really listening to your friend?). NOW, the invisible question changes to: How do I want to live my life? to help others, or just help myself? etc...Because I don't have the power to rewind. I've got one shot.

With all the real life issues they tackled in this game -that young adults are struggling with especially: drugs, bulling/harassment, the party scene, relationships, suicide and depression, life goals, self-esteem. The ending they chose just didn't fit...I personally was in a situation like the one with Kate, and the game gave me chills on how realistic it was, especially when you could no longer use Max's power. I never thought a story in a video game would almost bring me to tears so many times; so to me, the daily encounters with her peers and best friend is what can be taken from this game and should have been carried all the way through, leaving the player with a sense of purpose, and maybe, even a little conviction for the things we are currently doing that may be hurtful to ourselves and others.


Ideas for how to make the last chapter: A whole novel of ideas could be written because the story had so much potential (especially with all the things not used in the final chapter, or things that became obsolete). But the game has already been finished...no need to go there now.

Thanks for posting this thread Mono.

Oh! and I chose to save Chloe and let time take over.



Sacrificing Chloe is a consequence that mends the timeline through erasure. It's like tying a knot in a loose thread and preventing any unraveling.

Sacrificing Arcadia Bay is a consequence that lets time play out. Its like a built up static charge defusing.

I guess it's more radical to save Chloe. Tearing the butterfly photo in two drives in the point of accepting consequences and refusing to take the easy way out. Max wants to face the music. She made her bed and knows she's got to lie in it. However, Chloe being shot and killed is also pretty radical, too. I guess it's all very polarizing...heh. :D

...Well Put!

Xeva-q
22nd Oct 2015, 08:05
If you ever saw a stranger being killed - do not even bother, let them die. Screw them.

And so, this game had not only weak script, but also some rotten morality. great

MisterWind
23rd Oct 2015, 04:27
If you ever saw a stranger being killed - do not even bother, let them die. Screw them.

...I hope you don't mean that for real, Xeva-9. don't let this game upset you too much....I hope you Live life to the fullest, and help those in need every chance you get.

...But the game did leave that kind of depressing vibe, at least to me, which ruined the rest of the game for me. In the end, Max didn't learn anything other than: every time she tries to do something good, it ends up being a mistake, so she's left with only two choices: just give up (and let the town die), or keep herself from helping someone, stay in the shadows like she was before, and let evil and tragedy take its course without interfering. Its a sad way to end it in my opinion. But obviously not everyone saw it that way. and that's good!. I suggest, Xeva-9, that you write your own story, that inspires others to live their one life on earth well, and when you do, send me a copy because I already want to read it. (I'm not being sarcastic)

Take care!

Xeva-q
23rd Oct 2015, 14:06
I hope you Live life to the fullest, and help those in need every chance you get.

I hope, dear MasterWeed you can tell the difference between a person and work of fiction. Otherwise you really should use some mental help. I'm not being sarcastic.

And yes, unlike authors of this game, i can tell right from wrong, at the very least, on the very basic level.


9, that you write your own story, that inspires others to live their one life on earth well, and when you do, send me a copy because I already want to read it.

here it is:

http://www.proza.ru/2011/05/17/1258

MisterWind
23rd Oct 2015, 19:19
I'm sorry Xeva-9, I must have misunderstood your post, and I think you misunderstood mine. ...unfortunately I couldn't read your story. If there's a version out there translated in English?, I'd still like to check it out. Or if you have a published novel out there?

Take Care!