PDA

View Full Version : Deus Ex pronunciation?



Mousehunt
31st Aug 2014, 09:54
Something that I've been curious about for a long time actually.

Do you pronounce Deus Ex;

Deuce Ex?

or

Dayus Ex?

Ashpolt
31st Aug 2014, 13:07
It's Dayus Ex.

AdrianShephard
31st Aug 2014, 14:58
"DAY-US EX"

Every reviewer for some reason pronounces it "DAY-OOS EX" and I just want to slap them. I think even one of the devs said it in an interview....though I would slap him for other reasons :rasp:

CyberP
31st Aug 2014, 16:41
Easy now, this place is already hateful enough. Say what you want about their work but they do deserve mutual respect. It's not like they half-assed HR. They clearly put a lot of love into it.

AdrianShephard
31st Aug 2014, 16:59
Easy now, this place is already hateful enough. Say what you want about their work but they do deserve mutual respect. It's not like they half-assed HR. They clearly put a lot of love into it.

Hey, hey it was a lighthearted joke! Of course no one deserves any slapping (except for politicians)

CyberP
31st Aug 2014, 17:32
zNL2d02NN5U

AdrianShephard
31st Aug 2014, 17:50
zNL2d02NN5U

Not my cup of tea.

Franubis
31st Aug 2014, 19:18
Dius Ex, that's how I pronounce it in Spanish. Read the i as an "ee"

xaduha2
1st Sep 2014, 00:51
"DAY-US EX"

Every reviewer for some reason pronounces it "DAY-OOS EX" and I just want to slap them. I think even one of the devs said it in an interview....though I would slap him for other reasons :rasp:

Ehm, it's Latin, plenty of source material

NhgRAZU52j8

Mousehunt
1st Sep 2014, 04:24
Thanks guys, I thought it was Day-us Ex. Though when I originally got it I was pronouncing it Deuce Ex.

I often use both pronunciations.

AdrianShephard
1st Sep 2014, 04:41
Ehm, it's Latin, plenty of source material.

That's nice. I pull up the dictionary and I get this (looked up 'deus ex machina', only included the 'deus ex' part):

dā-əs-ˌeks (Merriam-Webster (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/deus%20ex%20machina))

The upside down 'e', or schwa, has the sound of 'a' in alone and sofa...essentially it sounds like 'uh' (source (http://www.americanaccent.com/pronunciation.html))

Dictionary.com (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/deus+ex+machina) pronounces it: "dey-uh s eks"

Macmillan Dictionary (http://www.macmillandictionary.com/us/pronunciation/british/deus-ex-machina) agrees with the other 2 dictionaries.

Oxford Dictionaries (http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/deus-ex-machina)also agrees. So does Cambridge Dictionary (http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/pronunciation/british/deus-ex-machina).

If you want to pronounce it the Classical Latin way, then (there are some conflicting pronunciations, I found) yes, you would say "dey - oos". But the "English" way of saying it is provided in all of the links.

Saying it slower, I realize the way I phonetically spelled it in my first post is not what I meant to write. I pronounce it more like "Day-is" where "is" is the sound in the beginning of the word 'Istanbul'. Whether you say it how I say it, or you go by the dictionary sources I provided, it's almost identical if said quick enough.

Anyway...if you heard someone pronouncing 'Wiki' as "we-key", I bet you'd give them a funny look. You might be surprised, though, that they are actually saying it right (it's Hawaiian).

xaduha2
1st Sep 2014, 13:41
English way... r-i-i-ght (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghoti).
Anyway, please don't slap the Pope.

ColBashar
1st Sep 2014, 15:21
The way that I was taught, "day-oos" is the Ecclesiastic Latin pronunciation "day-us" is the Classical Latin pronunciation. Those who use the former are probably either Catholic or learned to say it from someone who was. "Deuce" is simply a popular contraction of the above.

Neither form is representative of how Latin was spoken in ancient Rome. "Classical" is a bit of a misnomer since it really references the Enlightenment period when the standardization process began. There are scholars today who posit that ancient Latin shared more similarities with modern German phonetics than that of the romantic languages, which is why in Fallout: New Vegas "Caesar" is pronounced similarly to "kaiser".

While the classical latin pronunciation is more commonly used in the Anglosphere, adopted as the standard for the medical and legal professions in the ABCA countries, there are no rules that govern how to pronounce it in reference to video games. The closest to an official pronunciation you can get is to mimick how Warren Spector says it (day-us); however, given the nature of the game I wouldn't be surprised if he suggested you make your own choice. <g>

xaduha2
1st Sep 2014, 15:55
I don't know the history of Catholic Church down to details, but I think it's safe to say, that they know best. 'Deus' is somewhat important word, you know. :worship:

P.S: Speaking of German phonetics, how about this (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amadeus_(disambiguation))?

x6FAwcsPpm0

P.S. #2:

Found this stupid thing, with a map!
Audio volume caution, varies quite a bit!
http://www.forvo.com/word/deus/

AdrianShephard
1st Sep 2014, 18:44
English way... r-i-i-ght (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghoti)

Oh please...did you not see the pronunciation guide? In case you missed it: dā-əs-ˌeks. The 'a' with the bar on top means it's a long 'a' sound. Upside down 'e'= 'uh' sound. You can figure out the rest I hope. If you don't like how every major English dictionary pronounces 'deus ex', then I suggest you email the respective companies.

And I thought we've been over the slapping thing ;)

xaduha2
1st Sep 2014, 19:37
Oh please...did you not see the pronunciation guide? In case you missed it: dā-əs-ˌeks. The 'a' with the bar on top means it's a long 'a' sound. Upside down 'e'= 'uh' sound. You can figure out the rest I hope. If you don't like how every major English dictionary pronounces 'deus ex', then I suggest you email the respective companies.

And I thought we've been over the slapping thing ;)

Ah, the Internet.
Address a part of a previous message, repeat your own and sprinkle some 'ad hominem'. A perfect answer.

P.S. strikes again:

Alright, let’s break it down.
Why I even got into this ‘someone is wrong on the Internet’ argument:



Every reviewer for some reason pronounces it "DAY-OOS EX"

Well, maybe they heard it before or just, you know, thought it should be pronounced this way, based on pronunciation of similar Latin words, which often end in 'oos' (possibly true for Greek also).

Regarding ghoti - English is a chimera of a language and it’s alive, unlike Latin.
You cannot compare 'wiki' with 'deus', really. Wiki entered every popular language on Earth, for all intents and purposes it’s a new word. But 'Deus' is an old word and since it doesn’t exist as a part of English on its own… I’d take the original pronunciation, thanks. Or the closest we can get.

"That's the way we pronounce 'Deus Ex' around these parts circa 2000" doesn't fly.

LeMoN_LiMe
1st Sep 2014, 23:21
I like bacon.

And Day-OOOOS X

nexusdx
2nd Sep 2014, 14:32
"Hmm, Deus Ex. Interesting name. What does it mean?"
"God From."
"Oh, of course..." [backs away slowly]
Seriously, I think Warren just wanted to shorten it a bit. And it does sound cool. Any name that's pronounced just like "Day of Sex" gets my vote. :)
(Hmm... "Theos Apo"... naaah.)


I've seen it Dues X, deus-ex, DoSex, and my personal favorite.. Dos Equis...
I think we should change the name of the game to Dos Equis.. we could all get free beer then..
I know how warren feels too.. nobody spells my name right.. cept gollywog.. (But he's just a fanboy)



i was out with some people last night who kept calling it dessex. i got frustrated early on and refused to correct anyone. i sat there, keeping quiet about the mispronounciation. each person who then heard the name and commented butchered it further and further. dessex became dirssux became dresdux. it was quite amusing.
maybe we should change the name to DXM: Deus Ex Machina. at least people could spell DXM.



[lark] Could you please set everyon straight on the way you pronounce "Deus Ex"?
[Harvey Smith] day-oos ex
[Bob_White] Doo-sex
[Chad Warren] Dos Equis

...

so we still have official forums but where are the developers of dx3-4???

Miyavi
3rd Oct 2014, 19:59
Idk, its kinda annoying to hear deoos ex

AdrianShephard
4th Oct 2014, 02:19
Ah, the Internet.
Address a part of a previous message, repeat your own and sprinkle some 'ad hominem'. A perfect answer. What exactly were you trying to accomplish by linking me to the "ghoti" article on Wikipedia? Your posts bleed arrogance...get off your high horse and stop being a snarky prick.



Regarding ghoti - English is a chimera of a language and it’s alive, unlike Latin.
You cannot compare 'wiki' with 'deus', really. Wiki entered every popular language on Earth, for all intents and purposes it’s a new word. But 'Deus' is an old word and since it doesn’t exist as a part of English on its own… I’d take the original pronunciation, thanks. Or the closest we can get.

"That's the way we pronounce 'Deus Ex' around these parts circa 2000" doesn't fly.

I do not understand why you are implying that a word being 'new' in a language makes it alright for it to be mispronounced...you yourself are arguing that a word should be pronounced in the original way, not the way it is commonly said in someone's respective society/language. Personally, I do not really care how you pronounce Wiki -- I myself say [wi-key] because that's the 'English way' -- but dismissing this point on grounds that you fabricated is hypocritical.

The bolded bits are of value, I think. I agree that English is alive; the language is continually evolving and the use, pronunciation, and definitions of words are subject to change (see Phonological Change). When a person encounters a non-native word (take the French word 'fin' for example), they try to pronounce it using sounds from their natural language (so an English speaker would pronounce the final 'n'). It follows, then, that a phonological change would also affect the pronunciation of non-native words. My point? "That's the way we pronounce **insert word here** around these parts circa **insert time here**" does in fact fly because we are applying our language's phonetics to the word. This is not saying that the original pronunciation is wrong, but there will be a growing divide between the correct and common pronunciations...especially, as you pointed out, since Latin isn't used as much anymore.

Now linking this back to "Deus Ex": applying our phonetics -- as all the major dictionaries do -- is the natural way of saying the word (assuming English is your primary language), regardless if it is the absolute correct pronunciation. When someone pronounces the word not using the phonetics that we grew up using, it sounds weird. This is sort of like if someone frequently says [wee-key] in a conversation...while that is technically correct, it just doesn't sound 'right'. Perhaps this wouldn't be the case if Latin was an integral part of our language. But as it stands, whether you like it or not, there is a documented shift (i.e. dictionaries) in how we as English speakers pronounce the words "Deus ex" and "Deus ex machina". You can pronounce it however you want, but don't be angry with me if I think the way you say it is weird.

xaduha2
4th Oct 2014, 12:28
My point? "That's the way we pronounce **insert word here** around these parts circa **insert time here**" does in fact fly because we are applying our language's phonetics to the word. This is not saying that the original pronunciation is wrong, but there will be a growing divide between the correct and common pronunciations...especially, as you pointed out, since Latin isn't used as much anymore.

That's the root of the issue.
In the grand scheme of things - it's a pronunciation of a Latin word/phrase with an 'English accent', if you will.
None of that for me, thanks.

AdrianShephard
4th Oct 2014, 19:54
That's the root of the issue.
In the grand scheme of things - it's a pronunciation of a Latin word/phrase with an 'English accent', if you will.
None of that for me, thanks.

Fair enough.