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BridgetFisher
1st Aug 2014, 20:36
I was watching a movie called "Robocop", its an old 70's 80's movie about a cop that is half cop, half human, and half robot, but all crimefighter. I noticed a commercial at the start of this movie which it has to set the tone for the viewer of the atmosphere of the time period. One of thees commercials featured a cyber heart by the company "Jensen". What a great way to come up with the name for Deus Ex from one of the best movies to really show a human all auged out.

FrankCSIS
1st Aug 2014, 22:33
Is this open-mic night on the Eidos Forums Comedy Club? ;)

WildcatPhoenix
1st Aug 2014, 22:52
I was watching a movie called "Robocop", its an old 70's 80's movie about a cop that is half cop, half human, and half robot, but all crimefighter. I noticed a commercial at the start of this movie which it has to set the tone for the viewer of the atmosphere of the time period. One of thees commercials featured a cyber heart by the company "Jensen". What a great way to come up with the name for Deus Ex from one of the best movies to really show a human all auged out.

They directly reference Robocop in DXHR. You overhear two guys talking about in while in the air vent at one point (can't remember exactly where, but somewhere in Detroit).

I would also like to point out that Robocop came out in 1987 and literally everyone on earth has heard of it.

CyberP
1st Aug 2014, 23:08
Our Bridget must be an inexperienced young'un?

Did anybody ever watch a low budget presumably American-made 80s sci-fi movie, I think it was called Cyborg or something? Set in the future, the earth's atmosphere is hazardous (portrayed as red mist-like pollution). The protag, a late 20's-ish male with a mech hand, is scavenging in the wastes equipped with breathing apparatus and he discovers a robot. Brings robot back to the city for salvage. Takes to his apartment first, screws his lover and robot activates and of course is murderous. Rest of the film consists of fighting the robot in the apartment complex which gets demolished in the process. Quite a ****ty-average movie but since it was Cyberpunk themed I'm wondering if someone may have seen it.
I believe the robot used a drill as it's primary weapon.

Edit: Of course a quick google search produces results, but it was interesting to reminisce. I was like 9 or 10 when I watched this film:


Hardware (1990, UK)

M.A.R.K. 13 prototype killer combat droid

In this low-budget, cyber-punkish sci-fi horror hybrid film, an android head-helmet was found in the radioactive desert wasteland (previously in an area of New Jersey before an apocalypse) by an unnamed scavenger nomad (Carl McCoy).

Moses Baxter (Dylan McDermott) acquired the junked robot and gave it as a Christmas gift to his metalwork artist/girlfriend Jill Grakowski (Stacey Travis) who used it in one of her blowtorch and chain-saw sculptures.

The multi-limbed, intelligent military droid was originally government-programmed to kill people, without prejudice, as a means of population control (via the 'Emergency Population Control Bill'). The droid was named after a Biblical verse, Mark 13 ("Let no flesh be spared").

The humanoid skull (with an American flag painted on its headpiece) came to life (on Christmas Day, significantly) in her sculpture - the droid reconstructed itself from the various pieces of junk hardware in Jill's apartment, with glowing red eyes and a computer motherboard in the shape of a pentagram, claws, and a powerdrill. It then went on a killing rampage (with high-tech lasers and weapons).

The misogynistic MARK 13 first targeted Jill alone in her secure apartment, and conducted a simulated rape by forcing a revolving metal drill between her legs. The droid's fatal flaw was an inability to insulate against moisture - Jill lured the killer machine into her shower where she smashed it into pieces.

Annnd it appears I mentally blocked robot drill molestation from my young innocent mind. I used to watch a lot of crazy 18 rated movies back then. Way more interesting than Power Rangers or what have you.

FrankCSIS
1st Aug 2014, 23:31
I'm sure there's an allegory about soldiers, wartime and rapes in there somewhere, but....A misogynistic robot. Really?

Really?

:p

CyberP
1st Aug 2014, 23:34
Apparently so. If programmed to be this way, or if it happened through sentient emergence then it's plausible enough ;) Still, it is a bit silly...OK it's downright ridiculous, but it's part of the cyberpunk family nonetheless :)

FrankCSIS
1st Aug 2014, 23:40
That's it. Now all I can think of is a small battalion of Daleks buzzing about, yelling in their mechanical voices. "Women ARE an IN-FEEEE-RIOR species. RAPE. RAPE. RAPE. RAPE. RAPE."

CyberP
1st Aug 2014, 23:47
Lol'd hard.

Let's see what wikipedia says:


Production[edit]
The film's script was inspired by a short 2000 AD comic strip. Other influences include Soylent Green, Damnation Alley, and the works of Philip K. Dick.[4] Writer-director Richard Stanley had previously made a post-apocalyptic short film when he was a teenager, and Hardware grew out of that film and responses he got from other, unproduced scripts.[5] Stanley had recently joined a guerrilla Muslim faction in the Soviet war in Afghanistan,[4] where he shot a documentary.[5] After he left there, started pre-production of Hardware almost immediately afterward. Psychic TV was an inspiration for the exaggerated television broadcasts. Stanley says that the robot does not know that it is committing evil, and it only obeys its programming, which could be likened to a spiritual quest.[4] The opening scene was shot in Morocco, and the rest of the film was shot in east London. The film was originally more specifically British, but Miramax insisted on American leads. Stanley then added a multinational cast to muddy the setting. Stanley wanted to emphasize themes of fascism and passive acceptance of authoritarianism, as he had recently come from the apartheid regime of South Africa.[5]



Reception[edit]
Rotten Tomatoes, a review aggregator, reports that the film received positive reviews from 50% of twelve surveyed critics; the average rating was 5.7/10.[12] On its original release, Hardware received mixed reviews from critics, who cited it as derivative of Alien and The Terminator.[13] Owen Gleiberman of Entertainment Weekly rated the film D+ and called it unoriginal, "as if someone had remade Alien with the monster played by a rusty erector set."[14] Variety wrote, "A cacophonic, nightmarish variation on the postapocalyptic cautionary genre, Hardware has the makings of a punk cult film."[15] Michael Wilmington of the Los Angeles Times called it a shallow splatter film whose exaggerated bleakness elevates it above the typical techno-thriller.[16] Vincent Canby of The New York Times described it as a future midnight movie and wrote, "Watching Hardware is like being trapped inside a video game that talks dirty."[17] Richard Harrington of The Washington Post called it "an MTV movie, a mad rush of hyperkinetic style and futuristic imagery with little concern for plot (much less substance)."[18]

Despite mixed reviews during original release, Hardware managed to become a cult film. Ian Berriman of SFX wrote, "It's one of those lovingly crafted movies where ingenuity and enthusiasm overcome the budgetary limitations."[19] Matt Serafini of Dread Central rated it 4/5 stars and wrote, "Hardware isn't quite the masterpiece that some its most ardent fans have claimed, but it's an excellent piece of low-budget filmmaking from an era when low-budget wasn't synonymous with camcorder crap."[20] Bloody Disgusting rated it 3.5/5 stars and called it "an austere and tripy film" with a narrative that is "a disjointed mess"; however, the film's excesses make it a cult film.[21] Todd Brown of Twitch Film called it "essentially a lower budget, more intentionally punk take on The Terminator" that has an "undeniable ... sense of style".[22] At DVD Verdict, Daryl Loomis called it slow-paced but stylistic and atmospheric,[23] and Gordon Sullivan called it "a hallucinatory and violent film" that has an overly detailed, slow-paced beginning.[24] Writing for DVD Talk, Kurt Dahlke rated it 3/5 stars and called it a "forgotten gem" that "is overwhelmed by style and gore",[25] and Brian Orndorf called it "an art-house, sci-fi gorefest" that is moody and atmospheric without buckling under its own weight.[26] Michael Gingold of Fangoria rated it 3/4 stars and wrote, "If the ingredients of HARDWARE are familiar, Stanley cooks them to a boil with a relentless pace and imagery that makes his future a tactile place"

Personally I wouldn't recommend it unless you are obsessive about your Cyberpunk, but hey, I was young when I watched this so my opinion obviously lacks weight. It is certainly no Terminator or any other 80's/90's classic though (all of which I was well into around that time also), I can say that much.

Instead I recommend a different, though also somewhat obscure old school Cyberpunk film, Fortress: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3U6oLx3xy8s
Yes, the one Viktoria and I were discussing shortly the other day.

FrankCSIS
2nd Aug 2014, 00:03
Reading the inspiration for a film always feels like visiting a local pub that brews its own beer. The waiter goes on about the beer of the month. "This one is called Shanty Dreams. An IPA with a floral essence reminiscent of the Bermudas, with subtle accents of nutmeg, aged in a chest barrel." Of course, all you ever taste is the bitterness.

Because, much like indie rock and indie films, "if it ain't bitter, it ain't indie"!

Still. The Hive got me into rewatching Mad Max 1 and 2, which I will most likely do during the night if nothing else comes up. I just may have to find this film afterwards!

CyberP
2nd Aug 2014, 00:13
Still. The Hive got me into rewatching Mad Max 1 and 2, which I will most likely do during the night if nothing else comes up. I just may have to find this film afterwards!

See my edit. Or maybe watch both Hardware and Fortress :)
Hmm, what other obscure sci-fi/Cyberpunk films have I seen? Screamers was one. Similar to Hardware: wouldn't recommend unless you're really into Cyberpunk and "Old school cool", should hold your attention but won't leave your system shocked.

FrankCSIS
2nd Aug 2014, 00:22
Christopher Lambert and Kurtwood Smith? God, I don't care how tacky it looks, I'm watching this!

I have fond memories of Screamers. Long time, it's been, though.

Annnnd, we've officially molested this thread. Apologies, young one ;) But hey, more old films for you to watch!

CyberP
2nd Aug 2014, 00:29
More on topic: Whilst I like Robocop I wouldn't consider it to be best of material.


Christopher Lambert and Kurtwood Smith? God, I don't care how tacky it looks, I'm watching this!

It's a great movie for what it is. Solid enough performances from these two also. Let us know what you think.



Annnnd, we've officially molested this thread. Apologies, young one ;) But hey, more old films for you to watch!

Hey, if we are introducing her to more Cyberpunk films then we need to point her to the best of the best:

Terminator 1 + 2
Akira
Total Recall

These are my favourites. Yes, that's correct, no Matrix, Blade Runner or Ghost in the Shell (though I do rate them highly of course).

FrankCSIS
2nd Aug 2014, 01:10
Well, can't argue there. I could probably watch T2 on loop for the rest of my life.

Which brings up a point. There aren't that many "pre-apocalypse" movies out there. With all the post-apocalypse stuff we've seen for 30 years, I've never fully realised how clever the T2 setting was.

AdrianShephard
2nd Aug 2014, 01:45
That could be where they got the name...I never cared since I hate the character. EM drew more inspiration from RoboCop and Blade Runner (one of my favorite movies BTW) than DX 1. What should've shown up as a few Easter Eggs (and they still did) ended up influencing the plot more than necessary...giving us the social implication of technology on humans that EM is obsessed about but never clearly shows the player. Where is this Human Revolution that you speak of, EM? Yes, I see some protests and unrest, but seems to me like Jensen is more interested in finding his lady-friend than exploring the already unengaging topic of morality of augmentations.

I'm pretty sure that the Jensen revenge crusade was inspired by Murphy's own hunt for the people that killed him. Ironically (or intentionally), both the companies/creators of RoboCop and Jensen aren't who they seem to be at first sight.

And the OP should definitely watch Blade Runner. Every cyberpunk/sci-fi film you've ever seen is likely taking a few pointers from Blade Runner. Also, it is revered as one of the best, if not the best, sci-fi films ever created along with 2001: Space Odyssey, and Star Wars. Blade Runner usually clocks in at number 1 for the "top __ best sci-fi films".

Lady_Of_The_Vine
2nd Aug 2014, 08:38
I don't rate Star Wars. Blade Runner gets my vote. :thumb: