PDA

View Full Version : Deus Ex: HR Director's Cut - possibility of a GOG.com release?



Oppopji
5th Aug 2013, 14:58
Is there any chance that we can get DXHR: DC released on GOG.com please? Square-Enix/Eidos are already signed up with GOG and have a number of games available there, including the first Deus Ex and Invisible War - it would be very nice to have DXHR: DC there as well to complete the collection. I'm sure it would sell very well on GOG.com - I'd definitely buy it there at least (even pre-order it if possible) and would greatly prefer to buy it there than from any other distributor.

Darthassin
5th Aug 2013, 15:07
+1

Shralla
5th Aug 2013, 20:17
Square-Enix likes DRM too much. No chance, just like when everybody was asking for a non-Steam version of HR to begin with. And like how everybody is asking for a non-Steam version of Thief. Square-Enix exclusively releases new titles on Steam.

Oppopji
5th Aug 2013, 20:55
Well, Square-Enix did sign up with GOG.com some time after DXHR was released and have so far released 26 games there (http://www.gog.com/games##devpub=square_enix). It's worth asking about getting DXHR: DC released there too.

Mezmerizer
6th Aug 2013, 09:18
I believed GOG had only old games :scratch:

Darthassin
6th Aug 2013, 09:25
I believed GOG had only old games :scratch:

That is not the case any more.

besyuziki
6th Aug 2013, 10:36
Since the game doesn't need Steam for anything except achievements, a DRM-free release would be a nice gesture, and GOG is a great service except for the occasional fiascoes (http://www.gog.com/forum/general/gog_arcanum_release_uses_warez_scene_crack/page1).

Let's wait and see.

Oppopji
6th Aug 2013, 12:39
I believed GOG had only old games :scratch:

GOG have been selling new games for quite some time now... when they started doing so they rebranded from "Good Old Games" to just "GOG.com".



Since the game doesn't need Steam for anything except achievements, a DRM-free release would be a nice gesture, and GOG is a great service except for the occasional fiascoes (http://www.gog.com/forum/general/gog_arcanum_release_uses_warez_scene_crack/page1).

Let's wait and see.

Heh, some "fiasco"... AFAIK it's quite common for publishers/developers to do that with their older games for digital re-releases; I remember this being the case with at least one of Max Payne games on Steam too. The reason for this is that very often they no longer have a clean .exe or the source code for their older games, or it would be very time consuming and costly to have someone recreate the development environment and compile a clean .exe. I don't see anything wrong with them doing that, provided they perform proper QA to ensure that it works properly & doesn't have any dodgy code bundled with it.

besyuziki
6th Aug 2013, 17:12
Heh, some "fiasco"...

It is actually, and being common doesn't mean it's okay. What are people supposed to believe when those complaining about piracy and cracks are using said cracks for their benefit?

For Arcanum, a long-abandoned game with a split-up studio, I see your point, it was probably too costly or downright impossible to come up with a DRM-free exe, so they simply used one which was readily available. Still, remnants of Troika, Activision, or whoever benefited from the GoG deal could do more than that, or at the very least be more open about it. When I buy a digital game on Steam or GoG, it should be the real deal, not an abomination resembling a scene release.

In the case of Max Payne 2 and Rockstar, thy are hypocrites, alongside most major publishers. After the crack was discovered and Rockstar was criticized, it really didn't take long for them to replace the cracked exe with a clean one. Why not do it in the first place? Why wait to be ridiculed for using a crack?

Oppopji
6th Aug 2013, 20:11
It is actually, and being common doesn't mean it's okay. What are people supposed to believe when those complaining about piracy and cracks are using said cracks for their benefit?

Cracks are unauthorised modifications to a game's code, which may not work exactly as they should (and may also be illegal, depending on where you live). As such, they are unsupported by the game's developer/publisher/distributors.

However when a publisher/developer/distributor decides to "adopt" a crack for an official release for whatever reason it becomes at least "semi-official", and they take responsibility for ensuring that it works and providing some degree of official support for it.



For Arcanum, a long-abandoned game with a split-up studio, I see your point, it was probably too costly or downright impossible to come up with a DRM-free exe, so they simply used one which was readily available. Still, remnants of Troika, Activision, or whoever benefited from the GoG deal could do more than that, or at the very least be more open about it. When I buy a digital game on Steam or GoG, it should be the real deal, not an abomination resembling a scene release.

I doubt there is more they could have done, but I'm certain they made sure that it worked exactly as it should. Does it really matter where it came from as long as it works properly, doesn't include any unwanted/potentially harmful code and is properly supported?



In the case of Max Payne 2 and Rockstar, thy are hypocrites, alongside most major publishers. After the crack was discovered and Rockstar was criticized, it really didn't take long for them to replace the cracked exe with a clean one. Why not do it in the first place? Why wait to be ridiculed for using a crack?

From what I remember, they didn't replace it with a "clean" one but just blanked out the tags hidden within the .exe that which were used to identify it in the first place.

Psychomorph
7th Aug 2013, 01:33
Yes, a GoG release, please!

Pavio
7th Aug 2013, 02:08
I'd also love a GOG release! While they're working on the Director's Cut would be the best time to make a DRM-free version.

Mezmerizer
7th Aug 2013, 06:10
GOG have been selling new games for quite some time now... when they started doing so they rebranded from "Good Old Games" to just "GOG.com".


Oh, makes sense now, thanks

besyuziki
7th Aug 2013, 19:21
Cracks are unauthorised modifications to a game's code, which may not work exactly as they should (and may also be illegal, depending on where you live). As such, they are unsupported by the game's developer/publisher/distributors.

However when a publisher/developer/distributor decides to "adopt" a crack for an official release for whatever reason it becomes at least "semi-official", and they take responsibility for ensuring that it works and providing some degree of official support for it..

Legally, they may be entitled to use a chunk of code as long as they assure it works, but ethically they ARE using someone else's hard work for personal benefit, which is my only grievance. I don't care about warez scenes or anything, I don't support them for "fighting the good fight" against "money grubbing evil companies". I just think it's hypocritical of the video game industry to constantly diss cracks and use them. That's it.

Whatever, this is not going anywhere. What matters is a GoG release for DX: HR Director's Cut would be great.

Oppopji
21st Aug 2013, 21:39
Bumping in the hope that this gets noticed by someone at Eidos/Square Enix & we hopefully get DXHR DC released on GOG.com :)

Also I saw this blog post a while ago: http://eu.square-enix.com/en/blog/note-phil-rogers-ceo and sent him an email about this too

AlexOfSpades
22nd Aug 2013, 04:58
Signed.

Eventhough if i was going to buy it, i'd buy it from Steam.