PDA

View Full Version : PC Gaming Build Guide



Martelol
23rd Feb 2013, 13:12
Navigation:
PC Hardware (You are here)
Monitors (http://forums.eidosgames.com/showpost.php?p=1864668&postcount=8)
Keyboards and Mice (http://eidosforums.com/showpost.php?p=1865407&postcount=23)
Multi-Monitor Gaming & Super High-End System (Coming Soon)
Assembly Guide (Coming Soon)


UPDATE 2/23 - Replaced 1GB Radeon 7850 in midrange build with 2GB variant. Should help futureproof it better for minimal added cost.
UPDATE 2/26 - Replaced motherboard in high-end build. Previously listed board had gone up in price.

PC Hardware

A lot of people seem to be curious as to whether or not their systems will handle Tomb Raider, and unfortunately, not everyone's system will. I'm making this thread to simply serve as a guide to finding parts to build desktop systems capable of running the game at various settings, based on the given system requirements. Multiple builds will be listed, along with the reasons I've chosen each component. You will need to be willing to build your own computer for this to be of any direct use. It's daunting to many, but it's really quite simple these days. Even someone who has never touched anything inside a computer can read a guide online and go from parts to working system in a couple hours. If there's enough demand, I'll tear apart my HTPC and use it as a guide for assembling a computer :P

These builds have two goals: great bang-for-the-buck performance, and high reliability. Yes, there are better/faster components, and I'll certainly help anyone who wants to build a system where money is less of an issue, but that isn't the main purpose of this post. There are also certain components that may be easy to find cheaper, but sometimes it's worth it to spend an extra 20 dollars to get something that isn't going to blow up on you in a few months.

Unless otherwise specified, I'm assuming the game will be run at 1920x1080 resolution. I'm also assuming you will be reusing keyboards, mice, and monitors (though I will link to those in their own post). Links are to newegg, but you can buy the components anywhere you wish. And remember, these are all competent gaming machines. I'm going for affordable, but if you don't want to spend more than a console, buy a console.

As a final note, do understand that things like power supply capacity, type of optical drive (or even omitting one completely), case, and amount of RAM are completely up to you. I've listed my recommendations, but if you think something might be overkill for your uses, by all means, make some changes and save yourself some money. See the section about swapping parts near the end of this post for information on what can be easily swapped.

Alright, let's dig in.

First of all, operating system. None of the systems below include an OS. If you have a spare Windows key, you can use it. Otherwise, a Windows license is going to run you $100. Both links are for the 64-bit version of Windows. All systems below contain 64-bit processors, as 32-bit processors are on their way out. 32-bit processors can also only make use of 4GB of RAM, while every build here contains 8GB or more.

Windows 7:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832116986

Windows 8:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832416550

Both work great. Take your pick.


Budget System
This system should run the game on medium-high settings at 720p, and medium-ish at 1080p. It is not going to be very future-proof. It's cheap and will run a lot of games that are out right now decently, though.

CPU: AMD A10-5800K - $130
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819113280
This CPU actually has decent-performing integrated video, which will negate the need for a dedicated graphics card and save some money.

RAM: G.SKILL 8GB DDR3 1866 - $56
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231455
Why 8 gigs instead of 4 on the cheap build? Two reasons: RAM is cheap, and the CPU's integrated graphics will be stealing a gig of ram away for itself. People who know a bit about PC hardware will notice that this build actually opts for faster RAM than the other systems in this post. The reason for this is that the GPU in the processor sees great benefits from faster RAM. When we get into the systems with dedicated GPUs, having super-fast RAM makes almost no difference.

Case: Bitfenix Merc Alpha - $50
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811345014
A fairly no-frills case, but affordable and pretty well built.

Hard Drive: Seagate Barracuda 7200 RPM, 500GB - $60
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822148767
500GB is plenty for most people. You can spend another $15 or $20 and double your space, but this is meant to be cheap. If you want a larger hard drive, check the links in the beefier builds.

Optical Drive: Samsung 24x DVDRW - $18
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827151256
Nothing much to say. Reads and writes CDs and DVDs. Leave it out if you don't need it - I certainly never use mine.

Power Supply: Antec Earthwatts 380W - $50
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817371033
This is a low-wattage but very reliable power supply. It will handle a midrange dedicated GPU should you ever decide to buy one, but not a high-end one (not that you'd want to pair a high-end GPU with this CPU anyway).

Power Cable: 6ft - $5
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16812270406
Antec Earthwatts power supplies don't come with their own power cables. Luckily, they're cheap.

Motherboard: MSI FM2-A55M-E33 - $45
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813130661
This is the cheapest motherboard with an HDMI output. If you would rather have DVI, get this one (ASRock FM2A55M-DGS) instead:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157332

Total price: $414 + shipping



Midrange System
This system should run the game on medium-high (likely mostly high) settings at 1080p. It's a fairly large jump in price over the budget system, but will be significantly more future-proof.

CPU: Intel Core i5-3470 - $200
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115234
A good, mid-range quad-core processor. Not much else to say.

GPU: Sapphire Radeon HD 7850 2GB - $200
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814161426
A good card for a good price. The Radeon 7850 cards also overclock very well, so you can get a good amount of extra performance out of it if you put in a bit of time to overclocking it (will post a walkthrough later) NOTE: If you have not yet ordered Tomb Raider, this currently includes a free copy.

RAM: G.SKILL 8GB DDR3 1600 - $47
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231488
Sticking with 8 gigs here. We can use a bit slower memory because it does very little for day-to-day use, and we're using a dedicated GPU, so it won't have any effect on that.

Case: Corsair Carbide 200R - $60
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811139018
A bit bigger than the budget case, with an interior layout that will better accomodate the dedicated GPU.

Hard Drive: Seagate Barracuda 7200 RPM, 1TB - $75
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822148697
Doubled the space of the budget build. If you don't think you'll need the extra space, feel free to use the drive from the budget system above.

Optical Drive: Samsung 24x DVDRW - $18
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827151256
Nothing much to say. Reads and writes CDs and DVDs. Leave it out if you don't need it - I certainly never use mine.

Power Supply: Silverstone ST50F-ES 500W - $60
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817256061
Going for something beefier than the budget build as we have a dedicated, power-hungry graphics card.

Motherboard: ASRock B75M-GL - $60
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157326
This motherboard has 4 USB 3.0 ports, as well as two full-length PCI express slots, so you have the option of adding a second graphics card later, should you want to.

Total price: $720 + shipping



High-but-not-highest-end System
This system should have no issues running the game on high settings at 1080p and should be able to handle anything thrown at it for the duration of the upcoming generation of consoles.

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K - $230
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116504
Unlocked processor, meaning it's overclockable. You should be able to get around 4.2GHz with minimal effort. Why not an i7? Because it adds about $100 to the price, and the extra features of the i7 are only beneficial for a few very specific uses.

CPU Cooler: Arctic Freezer i30 - $40
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835186058
Say wha? Don't all of these processors come with coolers? Yes, they do, but this system is made to be overclocked. This will make sure things stay cool in there.

GPU - AMD: SAPPHIRE 100352-2L Radeon HD 7950 3GB - $300
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814202006
Very good performance without breaking the bank. If you'd rather have an nVidia card, you may want to consider...

GPU - nVidia: EVGA GeForce 660 Ti 2GB - $295
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130809
Very good performance without breaking the bank. If you'd rather have an AMD card, look up.

DO NOT BUY BOTH GPUS. PICK ONE OR THE OTHER. IF YOU HAVE NO BRAND LOYALTY, FLIP A COIN - THEY'RE BOTH GREAT

RAM: G.SKILL 16GB DDR3 1600 - $94
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231609
We're making the jump to 16 gigs on this build. You can drop down to the 8 gigs from the midrange build without much worry if you want to save a few bucks.

Case: Corsair Carbide 400R - $100
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811139008
Better cooling than the 200R and plenty of space for the large video cards.

Hard Drive - SSD: Samsung 840 120GB - $110
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820147188
Solid State Drives are expensive for the space you get, but are extremely fast. Almost anything installed to it will load anywhere from 4 to 10 times faster than a regular hard drive. If you want more space, search for the 250GB model (currently $190). If you want to save money, skip the SSD and just get the regular hard drive (but do get the regular drive even if you get the SSD)

Hard Drive - Mechanical: Seagate Barracuda 7200 RPM, 1TB - $75
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822148697
Doubled the space of the budget build. If you don't think you'll need the extra space, feel free to use the drive from the budget system. If you buy an SSD, you should still install games to the regular drive - with how much SSDs cost, it's just not worth it to have a game taking up so much space just so it can load a bit faster. You'll spend much more time playing than loading, and once you're in-game, the performance will be no different.

Optical Drive: Lite-On Blu-ray Burner - $70
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827106369
Reads and writes CDs, DVDs, and Blu-Rays. If you have no interest in blu-rays, you can swap this for a standard dvdrw from one of the previous builds, or omit it entirely.

Power Supply: Corsair TX850M 850W Modular - $125
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139029
Since this power supply has modular cables, you won't have a bunch of extra cables you don't need floating around inside your case. The 850W capacity also gives you plenty of headroom to add a second powerful graphics card.

Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 - $125
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157293
Has all the bells and whistles you're likely to need, and plenty of room to expand.

Total price (WITH SSD): $1564 + shipping
Total price (WITHOUT SSD): $1454 + shipping


A note on mixing and matching - Many, but not all, of the parts listed in this article can be mixed and matched. Here are the incompatibilities:

The CPU and motherboard from the budget build cannot be swapped for a different CPU/Motherboard from the other builds. You can swap BOTH, but not a single part. The midrange and high-end systems use Intel CPUs, which have a different socket from the AMD cpu used in the budget build. (You can interchange the CPU/Motherboards in the midrange and high-end builds, however).

GPU/Power Supply: Every build above can use any GPU or power supply from the other builds. However, if you're going to be using a dedicated graphics card, do not use the 380W power supply from the budget build. While it'll work with something like the Radeon 7850, you'll really be pushing it close to its limit. If you plan on running two graphics cards, I would also skip the 500W power supply used in the midrange build.



Highest-end system? Again, if there's demand, I'll link the parts for one, but these are intended to be systems that are reasonably affordable.

Hopefully some of you find this information useful. I'll be checking back periodically in case anyone has any questions or comments. It's past 5AM here, so I'm headed to bed, but I'll edit this when I get up to include monitors, keyboards, and mice.

Metalrocks
23rd Feb 2013, 13:22
wow. very helpful infos. :thumb:
im sure many will appreciate this thread you have made here.

Mike_B
23rd Feb 2013, 15:13
This looks ok. Although memory wise I would prefer Kingston and for SSD I would go for intel 520 series. Or if you prefer Samsung choose the Pro series. They're both more expensive but very reliable and a longer lifetime. For GPU and motherboard I would go for either MSI or Asus branded.

For the OS you might add to pick the 64bit version otherwise all that memory won't be usable. Personally I would stick with Windows 7 for now as it has proven to be very reliable.

Windows 8 is only useful if you have a touch screen if not IMO it's just an annoyance.


important note: if you are buying a new graphics card make sure you check which connections it has. The top models do not always have a connection for a VGA monitor (blue connector) which is still very common. If you want to use you current VGA monitor and want to connect it to a DVI-D (dvi digital only) port you will need this:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B0094H4IL2/ref=oh_details_o03_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

to convert the digital signal from the GPU to an analogue signal for the monitor. Plus you'll need a cable to connect that converter to the GPU.

Keiichi81
23rd Feb 2013, 20:28
I've got an AMD Phenom II X4 @ 3.6Ghz, a GeForce GTX 560 Ti and 8GB RAM. Should that be enough to run Tomb Raider on high settings with a decent framerate? All I can seem to find for system requirements are the minimum specs...

Relight-TRHQ
23rd Feb 2013, 21:00
All I can seem to find for system requirements are the minimum specs...
The recommended specs are in the first post of this thread:

http://forums.eidosgames.com/showthread.php?t=133428

Martelol
23rd Feb 2013, 21:07
This looks ok. Although memory wise I would prefer Kingston and for SSD I would go for intel 520 series. Or if you prefer Samsung choose the Pro series. They're both more expensive but very reliable and a longer lifetime. For GPU and motherboard I would go for either MSI or Asus branded.

For the OS you might add to pick the 64bit version otherwise all that memory won't be usable. Personally I would stick with Windows 7 for now as it has proven to be very reliable.

Windows 8 is only useful if you have a touch screen if not IMO it's just an annoyance.


important note: if you are buying a new graphics card make sure you check which connections it has. The top models do not always have a connection for a VGA monitor (blue connector) which is still very common. If you want to use you current VGA monitor and want to connect it to a DVI-D (dvi digital only) port you will need this:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B0094H4IL2/ref=oh_details_o03_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

to convert the digital signal from the GPU to an analogue signal for the monitor. Plus you'll need a cable to connect that converter to the GPU.


Brands are brands :) I've used just about everyone for memory; the system I'm posting from uses Crucial, my laptop uses Kingston, my HTPC and last couple builds for other people have been G.Skill. It's cheap and is of good quality. You certainly can't go wrong with either.

On SSDs, it gets tricky. Yes, Intel has the best reputation for reliability. However, Samsung is very, very close since the 830 series and tends to have better performance on top of that. There are definitely some brands and models I'd stay away from in the SSD market though. As far as lifetime, while yes, the 840 non-pro series will technically have the shortest life, realistically they'll last longer than the computer itself is likely to be in use.

Motherboards, yes, if money isn't a concern, I go for Asus, and users who want to spend a bit more should do the same. To most people, however, it's not going to make a difference. Do stay away from ECS, though ;)

No need to spend so much on a DVI->VGA adapter. The GeForce and Radeon 7850 cards come with one, and something like this will do the trick just fine for the 7950 (which has a DVI-I port, so it doesn't need active conversion):
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814998101

I did link the 64bit version of both versions of Windows, but yes, I will point that out when I edit the post. I've been using Windows 8 since August (MSDN Subscription, hence the early access) and while it took some serious adjusting and I didn't like it for a couple weeks, I now much prefer it to Win 7. I know I'm not everyone though, and that's why I linked both :)


I've got an AMD Phenom II X4 @ 3.6Ghz, a GeForce GTX 560 Ti and 8GB RAM. Should that be enough to run Tomb Raider on high settings with a decent framerate? All I can seem to find for system requirements are the minimum specs...

It'll probably be fine for medium-high. The thing when looking at system requirements is that they usually work like this: Minimum is really bare minimum and probably won't give an enjoyable experience, and recommended is good enough to give a good experience, but not necessarily to max everything out. You should be able to handle most settings on high I'd imagine, so I wouldn't worry :)

Martelol
24th Feb 2013, 00:38
Navigation:
PC Hardware (http://forums.eidosgames.com/showpost.php?p=1864412&postcount=1)
Monitors (You are here)
Keyboards and Mice (http://eidosforums.com/showpost.php?p=1865407&postcount=23)
Multi-Monitor Gaming & Super High-End System (Coming Soon)
Assembly Guide (Coming Soon)


Monitors

When looking for a monitor, your selection will largely be about what you want, not who makes it. Despite their reputation for cheap computers, Dell actually makes fantastic monitors, so don't be turned off by that name in my recommendations.

First, you need to decide what you want. There are three primary panel types: IPS, VA, and TN. With VA and IPS, you may see them listed as things like E-IPS, H-IPS, or PVA.

TN panels are cheap and have very fast response times, which typically makes them the preferred panel type for gaming. Their downsides are poor viewing angles and mediocre color reproduction. When I say mediocre color reproduction, be aware that it's not something most users will even notice - but if you're doing graphic design or photo editing at the professional level, steer clear of TN. A number of companies produce decent TN displays, so I'll recommend a couple.
Asus VH232H: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824236079
Samsung S22B350H: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824001549

If you want super-fast response times to eliminate ghosting and provide 3D capability (with proper video card and eyewear, of course), you really only get one choice of panel type: TN panel running at 120hz. I recommend the BenQ XL2420T, found here:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824014270



VA panels have a bit slower response times than TN, but much better color reproduction, contrast (actually the highest contrast of the three panel types), and viewing angles. These displays are becoming very rare, largely because IPS panels are better in most regards and have come down a lot in price over the last few years. The Dell 22440L is one of the few VA-panel displays in production.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824260106



IPS
Of the three panel types, IPS has the highest price and slowest response times (though for a game like Tomb Raider, which doesn't appear to be a fast-twitch game, it shouldn't be noticeable), but for that price you get excellent color reproduction and viewing angles. I'm going to recommend three Dell monitors here, all at different price points and serving different purposes.
Budget: Dell S2240L - http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/productdetail.aspx?c=us&cs=19&l=en&sku=320-9802
Midrange: Dell Ultrasharp U2412M - http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/productdetail.aspx?c=us&cs=19&l=en&sku=320-2676
High-end: Dell Ultrasharp U2413 - http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/productdetail.aspx?c=us&cs=19&l=en&sku=320-9567

If you just want a cheap IPS display, get the S2240L. If you want something nicer with a matte coating and much more adjustable stand, get the U2412M. If you're going to be doing a lot of serious graphic design or photo work, get the U2413.

A note on the Ultrasharp monitors: This is Dell's high-end display line, and there's one great benefit to that: if you find ANYTHING wrong with the display at all - a tiny bit of backlight bleeding, a single dead pixel, scuffed casing, you name it - they'll next-day you a new one along with a prepaid return label for the old one, no questions asked. They'll send you as many replacements as you want for 21 days, after which you're at the mercy of their regular warranty support.



PLS is a variation of IPS currently produced only by Samsung. They're a bit nicer than standard IPS displays, but as there's not much selection yet, they can be expensive.
Samsung S27A850D: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824001523



Backlighting
There are two primary types of backlighting - CCFL and LED. CCFL tends to have a bit better color reproduction, but brightness will fade over the years. LED backlit panels have improved tremendously recently, and won't suffer from reduced brightness for a very long time. All monitors linked here use LED backlighting. Like VA panels, CCFL-backlit displays are becoming harder to find.



Again, this is not a comprehensive list by any means, rather baseline recommendations and information on what to look for. This is much less clear-cut than my PC hardware lists, and is going to come down largely to user preference. Everything I've linked, however, should work great.

Mike_B
24th Feb 2013, 09:43
No need to spend so much on a DVI->VGA adapter. The GeForce and Radeon 7850 cards come with one, and something like this will do the trick just fine for the 7950 (which has a DVI-I port, so it doesn't need active conversion):
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814998101


Ah good I didn't check the link but indeed since it has a DVI-I port a cheap adapter will work :) It's just that I recently picked up a new GPU without paying attention to the connections and had to pick up such a converter since both my monitors are VGA and there was only one VGA connection on the graphics card, the rest was DVI-D. Just wanted to warn people about it but it seems that it isn't necessary.


I did link the 64bit version of both versions of Windows, but yes, I will point that out when I edit the post.

Ah good should really have checked those links.

Martelol
24th Feb 2013, 09:53
Ah good I didn't check the link but indeed since it has a DVI-I port a cheap adapter will work :) It's just that I recently picked up a new GPU without paying attention to the connections and had to pick up such a converter since both my monitors are VGA and there was only one VGA connection on the graphics card, the rest was DVI-D. Just wanted to warn people about it but it seems that it isn't necessary.

It's actually a good thing that you linked that, because it forced me to double-check what type of DVI connector was on the card. I kind of take it for granted I suppose, as most are DVI-I connectors, but someone might have been upset had it been DVI-D and all they had was VGA :P

On that note, to anyone who reads this: If you monitor has support for connections other than VGA, use them instead. Buy a cable if you have to, they're cheap from places like monoprice.com and even Amazon. You don't need gold plated connectors with special shielding on the cable and all that bull. When it comes to digital connections, if it works at all, it works 100%. Modern video cards lack VGA outputs for a reason :)

Lara Croft 1993
24th Feb 2013, 11:02
Martelol im sure many will appreciate your hard work,you put effort in this post,like a real pro.
Great job!:D

Martelol
24th Feb 2013, 11:22
Martelol im sure many will appreciate your hard work,you put effort in this post,like a real pro.
Great job!:D

Thanks :D I plan to continue adding to it over the next few days. I still need to do keyboard/mice, and I'm going to add a section to it regarding multi-monitor gaming, since Tomb Raider supports it (this will also contain an ultra-high end build). Anyone who has questions, feel free to ask. If anyone wants a build tailored specifically to their budget, I'm happy to provide those as well.

Lara Croft 1993
24th Feb 2013, 11:35
Thanks :D I plan to continue adding to it over the next few days. I still need to do keyboard/mice, and I'm going to add a section to it regarding multi-monitor gaming, since Tomb Raider supports it (this will also contain an ultra-high end build). Anyone who has questions, feel free to ask. If anyone wants a build tailored specifically to their budget, I'm happy to provide those as well.


OK i have question,what do you think about my configuration and how long will i be able to play games on ultra high settings:

Asrock Z77 Pro4
Intel i5 2500K
Sapphire Radeon 7870 2GB
LG Burner
560W
320GB HDD(i know it's not much,but it's enough for me :D)

PS

What do you think about Crossfire between XFX Radeon 5770 1GB and Sapphire Radeon 7870 2GB (if it's possible)?

Martelol
24th Feb 2013, 12:12
OK i have question,what do you think about my configuration and how long will i be able to play games on ultra high settings:

Asrock Z77 Pro4
Intel i5 2500K
Sapphire Radeon 7870 2GB
LG Burner
560W
320GB HDD(i know it's not much,but it's enough for me :D)

PS

What do you think about Crossfire between XFX Radeon 5770 1GB and Sapphire Radeon 7870 2GB (if it's possible)?

Here's the thing: The Playstation 4 and new Xbox are coming out around the end of this year. When consoles increase their graphical capability, PC games also benefit. The downside is that it makes it very difficult to predict how well new games are going to run, say, 2-3 years from now. While your system will certainly be fine for games out now and coming out in the next year or two, you may not be able to handle everything at maximum settings in a couple years. Everything should certainly still be playable, but reducing settings may end up making games look more similar to how they look on consoles, rather than being able to turn settings way up and make the PC version look much better.

Over the next couple of years, I think you'll be just fine to run most things on high. If you're using the stock Intel CPU cooler, I recommend getting an aftermarket cooler and overclocking your CPU - almost every i5 2500k I've worked with has hit 4.5ghz with very little effort.

On the video card front, you may need to upgrade that eventually. The 7870 is a good card (I have an overclocked 7850 in my HTPC), but I won't be 100% sure of its long-term capability until the next gen consoles arrive. As I said above, you'll almost definitely have to start running at slightly reduced settings within the next couple years.

You do have the option of adding a second video card. Right now, AMD has some pretty serious problems with stuttering in Crossfire mode - the average framerate will be high, but stuttering will make the game seem choppy (I'll explain below). Nvidia SLI is much smoother. If you go the two card route, you'd probably also want to upgrade your power supply a bit.

Explanation of the AMD stutter issue: Currently, AMD has a bit of a problem, and luckily they're working to fix it. Nvidia figured out a while ago that frames-per-second isn't the only important performance metric, but also seconds-per-frame. Think of this: when you measure something at 60FPS, that means each frame took an average of ~16.67ms to render. The problem with that is that it's an average. What could really be happening (and the problem AMD is facing) is that most of the frames are rendering faster than that - let's say 58 of those frames take 15ms to render, for a total of 870ms - and the remaining two frames each take 65ms to render. The result is that while you have a great average framerate, there is a noticeable jerkiness/stutter to motion. On the technical level, AMD has identified it as a problem in the way their drivers manage memory on their cards. Fixing it will take a full rewrite of their memory management driver, which they're working on, but it will take a number of months of development and testing before it's released. In the meantime, they've been releasing beta drivers containing fixes for individual popular games (ie Skyrim). Now, for Crossfire - while AMD hasn't talked about Crossfire stuttering specifically, I have a suspicion that Crossfire stuttering is caused by the same memory management issue,and it gets amplified by the fact that there are multiple cards doing it instead of just one. If this is the case, Crossfire's stuttering may end up being fixed when AMD is done with the new memory management driver.


Finally, to address your question of running the 7870 and 5770 in Crossfire - no, you can't. You can have them both in the same system and use both cards to drive displays (in fact, I have a GeForce GTX 580 and a Radeon 5770 in my system, because I have 3 displays and the 580 only supports 2), but the only circumstance under which you can run mismatched cards in Crossfire is if they're part of the same product line. For AMD cards, this means the first two digits of the model have to match - you can run a 7870 and 7850 in Crossfire, but not a 7870 + 7770 or a 7870 + 6870. When running mismatched cards in Crossfire mode, the faster card will underclock itself and disable shader units as necessary so that it essentially becomes a matched version of the slower card.

Lara Croft 1993
24th Feb 2013, 12:29
Here's the thing: The Playstation 4 and new Xbox are coming out around the end of this year. When consoles increase their graphical capability, PC games also benefit. The downside is that it makes it very difficult to predict how well new games are going to run, say, 2-3 years from now. While your system will certainly be fine for games out now and coming out in the next year or two, you may not be able to handle everything at maximum settings in a couple years. Everything should certainly still be playable, but reducing settings may end up making games look more similar to how they look on consoles, rather than being able to turn settings way up and make the PC version look much better.

Over the next couple of years, I think you'll be just fine to run most things on high. If you're using the stock Intel CPU cooler, I recommend getting an aftermarket cooler and overclocking your CPU - almost every i5 2500k I've worked with has hit 4.5ghz with very little effort.

On the video card front, you may need to upgrade that eventually. The 7870 is a good card (I have an overclocked 7850 in my HTPC), but I won't be 100% sure of its long-term capability until the next gen consoles arrive. As I said above, you'll almost definitely have to start running at slightly reduced settings within the next couple years.

You do have the option of adding a second video card. Right now, AMD has some pretty serious problems with stuttering in Crossfire mode - the average framerate will be high, but stuttering will make the game seem choppy (I'll explain below). Nvidia SLI is much smoother. If you go the two card route, you'd probably also want to upgrade your power supply a bit.

Explanation of the AMD stutter issue: Currently, AMD has a bit of a problem, and luckily they're working to fix it. Nvidia figured out a while ago that frames-per-second isn't the only important performance metric, but also seconds-per-frame. Think of this: when you measure something at 60FPS, that means each frame took an average of ~16.67ms to render. The problem with that is that it's an average. What could really be happening (and the problem AMD is facing) is that most of the frames are rendering faster than that - let's say 58 of those frames take 15ms to render, for a total of 870ms - and the remaining two frames each take 65ms to render. The result is that while you have a great average framerate, there is a noticeable jerkiness/stutter to motion. On the technical level, AMD has identified it as a problem in the way their drivers manage memory on their cards. Fixing it will take a full rewrite of their memory management driver, which they're working on, but it will take a number of months of development and testing before it's released. In the meantime, they've been releasing beta drivers containing fixes for individual popular games (ie Skyrim). Now, for Crossfire - while AMD hasn't talked about Crossfire stuttering specifically, I have a suspicion that Crossfire stuttering is caused by the same memory management issue,and it gets amplified by the fact that there are multiple cards doing it instead of just one. If this is the case, Crossfire's stuttering may end up being fixed when AMD is done with the new memory management driver.


Finally, to address your question of running the 7870 and 5770 in Crossfire - no, you can't. You can have them both in the same system and use both cards to drive displays (in fact, I have a GeForce GTX 580 and a Radeon 5770 in my system, because I have 3 displays and the 580 only supports 2), but the only circumstance under which you can run mismatched cards in Crossfire is if they're part of the same product line. For AMD cards, this means the first two digits of the model have to match - you can run a 7870 and 7850 in Crossfire, but not a 7870 + 7770 or a 7870 + 6870. When running mismatched cards in Crossfire mode, the faster card will underclock itself and disable shader units as necessary so that it essentially becomes a matched version of the slower card.


Woow man :eek:
Your sure know much about computers.
It all makes sense now.
I will sell 5770 and run single 7870.
I should also upgrade monitor because i have 19'' (1280x1024) ,but that's different story,right now my mom wants to kill me because i will spend about $1100 :D

PS

Do you work or did you consider to work as PC technician because you have great knowledge about it.

Martelol
24th Feb 2013, 12:40
Woow man :eek:
Your sure know much about computers.
It all makes sense now.
I will sell 5770 and run single 7870.
I should also upgrade monitor because i have 19'' (1280x1024) ,but that's different story,right now my mom wants to kill me because i will spend about $1100 :D

PS

Do you work or did you consider to work as PC technician because you have great knowledge about it.

No, by trade I am a software developer and UI designer. Friends, family, and a couple local businesses are aware of what I know though, so while I don't advertise myself as a PC technician, I earn a little from it on the side from those in-the-know.

Metalrocks
24th Feb 2013, 12:42
he sure is useful in this section. even when i had a course in pc hardware (which was back in 2005), there are still many things i have to learn as well.
i personally cant follow the progress of the hardware anymore but i know enough. but even me, need help and advice, so i would consult him as well if something is unclear.

Lara Croft 1993
24th Feb 2013, 12:56
he sure is useful in this section. even when i had a course in pc hardware (which was back in 2005), there are still many things i have to learn as well.
i personally cant follow the progress of the hardware anymore but i know enough. but even me, need help and advice, so i would consult him as well if something is unclear.

I totally agree.
You can't possible know everything about every PC component,but i see your showing very much knowledge too.
I will be honest and say:i didn't see better PC experts in a long time,and im member of many PC forums ;)

Metalrocks
24th Feb 2013, 13:15
I totally agree.
You can't possible know everything about every PC component,but i see your showing very much knowledge too.
I will be honest and say:i didn't see better PC experts in a long time,and im member of many PC forums ;)

yeah, they are hard to find. i know some really good once in a german forum. they even recommended the suitable hardware for the pc i have now, so as my last pc.
just for me it was weird to understand their help because my system is in english and therefor it makes it harder when they explain a path in german because the names are different.
some of it i can figure out but the rest turns out in to a guessing game.

but since i know enough, i hardly have problems and can help others as well if its in my knowledge. so i sure will keep an eye here as well and help out were i can.

Martelol
24th Feb 2013, 13:30
yeah, they are hard to find. i know some really good once in a german forum. they even recommended the suitable hardware for the pc i have now, so as my last pc.
just for me it was weird to understand their help because my system is in english and therefor it makes it harder when they explain a path in german because the names are different.
some of it i can figure out but the rest turns out in to a guessing game.

but since i know enough, i hardly have problems and can help others as well if its in my knowledge. so i sure will keep an eye here as well and help out were i can.

The more, the merrier I say! It's even beneficial to have people of differing knowledge levels like this. I try to explain things in a way that users without a lot of PC knowledge can understand, but even some of that flies right over peoples heads. Those who know a fair bit about hardware but aren't the total nerds I am are good at translating my techno-babble into something a little more regular-person friendly ^_^

Metalrocks
24th Feb 2013, 13:42
The more, the merrier I say! It's even beneficial to have people of differing knowledge levels like this. I try to explain things in a way that users without a lot of PC knowledge can understand, but even some of that flies right over peoples heads. Those who know a fair bit about hardware but aren't the total nerds I am are good at translating my techno-babble into something a little more regular-person friendly ^_^

true. i always try to keep it as simple as possible that people can follow. i guess you have noticed that im not a total nerd here :D

Martelol
24th Feb 2013, 13:44
true. i always try to keep it as simple as possible that people can follow. i guess you have noticed that im not a total nerd here :D

Yep, but I've also noticed that you know enough that you can often give solid advice :D

Metalrocks
24th Feb 2013, 13:52
Yep, but I've also noticed that you know enough that you can often give solid advice :D

yes i can. as long its in my knowledge. :D

Martelol
25th Feb 2013, 11:23
Navigation:
PC Hardware (http://forums.eidosgames.com/showpost.php?p=1864412&postcount=1)
Monitors (http://forums.eidosgames.com/showpost.php?p=1864668&postcount=8)
Keyboards and Mice (You are here)
Multi-Monitor Gaming & Super High-End System (Coming Soon)
Assembly Guide (Coming Soon)



Keyboards and Mice

Like monitors, this is going to be another subjective section. I will only make a couple recommendations, and will instead focus more on discussing features you should look for in gaming keyboards and mice.



Keyboards

There are two primary types of keyboards - membrane-based, and mechanical.


Membrane keyboards are by far the most common - a large piece of rubber is in the keyboard, with raised domes under each key. When the dome is pushed down as a result of the user pressing on a key, an electrical connection is made on a circuit below the rubber membrane, registering the key press. The two main advantages of membrane keyboards are price and noise - they tend to be very quiet, and are cheap to produce. On the other hand, you typically have to press the keys all the way down in order for a key press to register, and they don't provide much tactile feedback.


Mechanical keyboards - remember the old, insanely loud, clicky IBM keyboards from back in the day? Those are mechanical keyboards, and they're making a comeback. Things are a bit different this time around, though. The most popular switches, called Cherry MX switches, are identified by 6 colors, with varying properties:

Cherry MX Black - Quiet, non-tactile, high actuation force
Cherry MX Red - Quiet, non-tactile, low actuation force
Cherry MX Brown - Quiet, tactile, medium actuation force
Cherry MX Clear - Quiet, tactile, high actuation force
Cherry MX Blue - Clicky, tactile, high actuation force
Cherry MX White - Clicky, tactile, choice of low or very high actuation force

The way these switches work is that every key has an individual mechanical switch inside. When the user presses a key, the switch will close to complete a circuit, registering the key press. What's so great about this as opposed to membrane keyboards? Other than the option to have clicky and/or tactile keys - which is personal preference, and you'd have to try to find them at a store to really know what you prefer - you only have to press the keys about 1/4 of the way down before the key press registers. Because of this, you never miss a keypress. As you adjust and learn not to press keys all the way down, you will also be reducing the impact stress placed on your fingers.


Features to look for

Anti-ghosting: This is the most important thing to look for. Cheaper keyboards will often only support two or three simultaneous keypresses - if you try to press another, it simply won't register. To make matters worse, it can depend on what keys you're pressing - one combination may limit you to two simultaneous keys, while another may limit you to four. You may not immediately think that you ever press that many keys at once, but it happens more often than you think - what if you're holding shift to run fast, W and A to go forward and strafe left, and try to jump? Perhaps your jump doesn't register, and your character plummets to its death. Or perhaps the spacebar overrides another key, throwing your trajectory off. It's annoying. Look for a keyboard with anti-ghosting. These keyboards typically allow you to press anywhere between 6 and 20 simultaneous keys (again, sometimes depending on the actual keys being pressed) - a much more difficult number of simultaneous keypresses to reach.

Macro Keys: Some people love these. Most (including me) never use them. If you think you want them, I suggest looking for a keyboard where the macro keys don't occupy much space. Adding a couple inches to the width of your keyboard can create more issues than you'd think, especially if you're using a cramped keyboard tray.

Backlighting: This is one of those things that nobody cares about until they have it, then lose it. If possible, look for a backlit keyboard.

Recommendation: Corsair Vengeance K90 (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005QUQP94). This keyboard uses Cherry MX Red switches (the most common type for gaming, as they require the least force to press), is backlit, and has macro keys. One thing to note is that the macro keys F1-F12 keys, and the pgup/pgdown/del/end/etc cluster above the arrows keys are membrane based. The main keyboard area (including numbers) and the numpad are mechanical. Corsair has announced the K95, in which all keys are mechanical, but it hasn't hit the market yet.




Mice

Mice can be tricky - you have regular optical mice, laser mice, wired mice, wireless mice, mice with a few buttons, mice with 20 buttons - the list goes on.

First and foremost, though, you should look at comfort. Go to an electronics store and use the mice they have out for demos. Move it around. Test the wheel's scrolling force and ability to press down. See how easy any side buttons (if present) are to press. If anything isn't quite right - if you find your finger isn't in a comfortable position to click the scrollwheel, for example - move on to another mouse. If the mouse itself and frequently used buttons don't feel natural to you, don't get it. It's less an issue of "I do/don't like how this mouse feels" and more an issue of long-term health. It's no secret that using a mouse all day can be rough on your wrists over the years, so find something that's comfortable for you.

Latency and polling rate are important factors for games - especially fast-twitch games like shooters. Latency is how long it takes from the time you move the mouse until it's registered on the computer. Polling rate is how many updates the mouse sends to the computer per second. Higher polling rates result in greater accuracy. These areas are where wired mice pull ahead of wireless mice - wired mice have lower latency simply due to the fact that there's no signal to broadcast wirelessly, process, and then send to the computer. Wireless mice also operate at a much lower polling rate to conserve battery. Wireless mice have come a long way in the last few years, but if you're planning on playing fast-paced games, I'd recommend sticking to wired mice.

Laser vs Optical. The names are a little misleading, as lasers are, of course, a form of optical technology. Either way, it indicates precision - laser mice have much more precision, and as such work on more surfaces (optical mice frequently have trouble on plain-colored surfaces [especially white] and glass) and are less likely to cause your mouse pointer to jump around when moving the mouse very quickly. There is an exception to this rule, which I'll point out in my recommendations below.




Recommendations

Perhaps the biggest names in gaming mice are Logitech and Razer. Fanboys will argue over which is better, but it all comes down to preference. Personally, I much prefer Logitech's ergonomics, so they will be my recommendation. Do look up mice from other companies, though, as you may find something you like more.

Logitech G500 (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B002J9GDXI) - This is the mouse I use personally. It fits my hand like a glove, is very precise, and the free-spinning scrollwheel (which is toggled - it can click like a normal scrollwheel as well) is absolutely fantastic for scrolling through long webpages.

Logitech G400 (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0055QZ216) - Variations of this mouse have been around for a while - it's an evolution of the MX500, MX510, and MX518. The body shape hasn't changed - though the paintjob has. The sensor has also been improved with subsequent releases. While this is a standard optical mouse as opposed to laser, many gamers swear by this mouse due to its ridiculously low latency. I had (and still have sitting on my desk, actually) an MX518 before switching to the G500, and it's a fantastic mouse - I do prefer the ergonomics of the G500, though (and the scroll wheel).

Dishonorable Mention: Mad Catz R.A.T. mice. A number of people like these mice, but they have a fatal flaw - they have a dynamic polling rate and offer no way of disabling the feature. In a select few games, this causes the mouse sensitivity to fluctuate at random, making them extremely difficult to play with this mouse.



Wrap-up

There's not much else to say. If you're unsure of what to get, you should really try to find some of the keyboards and mice you think you may want in person, and give them a try. These really boil down to personal preference, so asking "should I get this one?" won't do much good.

Metalrocks
25th Feb 2013, 12:30
dint know about the keyboards being slow to react to several button mashing at once. mine was just 20$. a swiss keyboard from dell because i need ü ö ä for german. have it several years now and no problems.

i also have a G5 mouse from logitech. payed over 120AUD for it. its the best mouse i ever had. its big and comfortable in the hand. plus, you can insert weights in to it, to suit your movements. got it since 2007 or 2008 and still works today :D
jwsgde_logitech-g5-2007.jpg
thats exactly the one i have.

i love the 2 buttons on the side. makes it so much easier and faster to switch back and forward on websites.
also many games support these buttons which makes it easier for other functions. but some dont which is sad and weird for what ever reason:(

in BF3 i use one buttons for knifing and the other for throwing grenades.
or in max payne 3 for melee and the other for bullettime. so much faster if you are in a heavy firefights and your left hand is busy with dodging bullets, etc.

so yes, i can highly recommend this mouse. best buy for sure. :thumb:

Lara Croft 1993
25th Feb 2013, 12:43
dint know about the keyboards being slow to react to several button mashing at once. mine was just 20$. a swiss keyboard from dell because i need ü ö ä for german. have it several years now and no problems.

i also have a G5 mouse from logitech. payed over 120AUD for it. its the best mouse i ever had. its big and comfortable in the hand. plus, you can insert weights in to it, to suit your movements. got it since 2007 or 2008 and still works today :D
jwsgde_logitech-g5-2007.jpg
thats exactly the one i have.

i love the 2 buttons on the side. makes it so much easier and faster to switch back and forward on websites.
also many games support these buttons which makes it easier for other functions. but some dont which is sad and weird for what ever reason:(

in BF3 i use one buttons for knifing and the other for throwing grenades.
or in max payne 3 for melee and the other for bullettime. so much faster if you are in a heavy firefights and your left hand is busy with dodging bullets, etc.

so yes, i can highly recommend this mouse. best buy for sure. :thumb:

I never could imagine having a different mouse like yours.
I always admire people like you,because i can't play or do anything with more then 3 buttons mouse.
I was at my friend long time ago,and he had mouse like yours,i try to play with it and was constantly keep pressing those extra buttons by accident.
I have new keyboard with little smaller keys and it's have multimedia buttons,and i keep doing same thing i did with that mouse :mad2:
I still prefer and i believe i will always prefer old mouses like mine.
This is my mouse

josryb_46404fdbbe9a1.jpg

Model Logitech RX300

Metalrocks
25th Feb 2013, 13:03
I never could imagine having a different mouse like yours.
I always admire people like you,because i can't play or do anything with more then 3 buttons mouse.
I was at my friend long time ago,and he had mouse like yours,i try to play with it and was constantly keep pressing those extra buttons by accident.
I have new keyboard with little smaller keys and it's have multimedia buttons,and i keep doing same thing i did with that mouse :mad2:
I still prefer and i believe i will always prefer old mouses like mine.
This is my mouse

josryb_46404fdbbe9a1.jpg

Model Logitech RX300

lol, used that mouse at a friends place and i found it pretty uncomfortable. always funny the preferences people have :lol:
thats funny that you keep pressing these buttons on the side. right beneath it is a big place for the thumb to rest and move the mouse.
to press these buttons i just move my thumb up.

Martelol
25th Feb 2013, 13:03
<g5 snip>

The G5 is a nice mouse. My G500 is actually a warranty replacement of my G5, which met an untimely end. On that note, the G5 is no longer in production. The reason they sent me a G500 is because it replaced the G5 in their product lineup :)

Metalrocks
25th Feb 2013, 13:08
The G5 is a nice mouse. My G500 is actually a warranty replacement of my G5, which met an untimely end. On that note, the G5 is no longer in production. The reason they sent me a G500 is because it replaced the G5 in their product lineup :)

seriously?? dint know that. proof again that i dont keep up with hardware :nut:
thats funny, i thought i saw my mouse still in stores. but could be i was mistaken, then i dint really look that close. was just a quick look.
so what the big difference between a G5 and a G500??

Martelol
25th Feb 2013, 13:10
seriously?? dint know that. proof again that i dont keep up with hardware :nut:
thats funny, i thought i saw my mouse still in stores. but could be i was mistaken, then i dint really look that close. was just a quick look.
so what the big difference between a G5 and a G500??

Much higher resolution sensor and the free-spinning scroll wheel.

Metalrocks
25th Feb 2013, 13:15
Much higher resolution sensor and the free-spinning scroll wheel.

so this high resolution sensor means that its more sensitive? dont understand the free spinning wheel.
well, i still keep my mouse for as long as possible. i never throw away a mouse or keyboard until it really doesnt work anymore. :D

Lara Croft 1993
25th Feb 2013, 13:20
lol, used that mouse at a friends place and i found it pretty uncomfortable. always funny the preferences people have :lol:
thats funny that you keep pressing these buttons on the side. right beneath it is a big place for the thumb to rest and move the mouse.
to press these buttons i just move my thumb up.

Maybe it's because i have stronger grip then most of people.:scratch:
Just to get impression,check how i holding my(and all other)mouse:

jcquet_Picture-6.jpg

jssijt_Picture-8.jpg

I know it's kind a stupid i put pics but see how small free space i have on it?:D

Metalrocks
25th Feb 2013, 13:23
ok, now i see why you would press these buttons all the time. you are left handed.
yes, my mouse is clearly made for right handed people. but im sure there is a left handed mouse as well of this type.

Lara Croft 1993
25th Feb 2013, 13:29
ok, now i see why you would press these buttons all the time. you are left handed.
yes, my mouse is clearly made for right handed people. but im sure there is a left handed mouse as well of this type.

Yeah,that's probably a reason why i press them.
However,in less then a week,i will buy new components for PC,so i will stop at that shop and check left handed mouses.
But can you tell me-can i put those extra buttons,instead keys on my keyboard,for example:if i put mouse button 4 i will have same effect on mouse like im pressing CTRL?
If that's possible,i will really consider about taking that kind of mouse,because playing Sleeping Dogs without dir. arrows was disaster.

Metalrocks
25th Feb 2013, 13:37
Yeah,that's probably a reason why i press them.
However,in less then a week,i will buy new components for PC,so i will stop at that shop and check left handed mouses.
But can you tell me-can i put those extra buttons,instead keys on my keyboard,for example:if i put mouse button 4 i will have same effect on mouse like im pressing CTRL?
If that's possible,i will really consider about taking that kind of mouse,because playing Sleeping Dogs without dir. arrows was disaster.

do you mean key bindings??
as i said, not every game supports these side buttons for some reason. i press the key on the mouse i want to bind and nothing happens. but thats really only on a hand full of games.
anyway, yes, if you find a left handed mouse you can even use these sides buttons for either the flashlight, crouching, aiming...what ever you like to bind it on. like these examples i mentioned earlier for BF3 and MP3. :D

Lara Croft 1993
25th Feb 2013, 13:46
do you mean key bindings??
as i said, not every game supports these side buttons for some reason. i press the key on the mouse i want to bind and nothing happens. but thats really only on a hand full of games.
anyway, yes, if you find a left handed mouse you can even use these sides buttons for either the flashlight, crouching, aiming...what ever you like to bind it on. like these examples i mentioned earlier for BF3 and MP3. :D


Yeah i meant key bindings.
I wasn't sure that was possible,but it's really cool.
See,since im left handed i must play on arrows,and Sleeping Dogs didn't support arrows,so i had to play on closest left key on keyboard and that were Croatian *ČĆŽ and other buttons around them.
But i get use to.
I only hope Tomb Raider will support arrows,because that's my only concern about new Tomb Raider.

EDIT:i check mouses on that store,and there is no mouses for left handed guys-and i check about 50 of them.
Well that only confirms statistics that there is 90% right-handed peoples and 10% of left handed.

PS

While i was looking them,i saw these....mouses?:eek:

jlhmmj_101.503.348.jpg

jafcrr_101.503.276.jpg

Do you have any idea could you,or anyone you know be able to control those things???

Martelol
25th Feb 2013, 14:12
so this high resolution sensor means that its more sensitive? dont understand the free spinning wheel.
well, i still keep my mouse for as long as possible. i never throw away a mouse or keyboard until it really doesnt work anymore. :D

Better tracking, both in the sense that it's less likely to go nuts if you move the mouse quickly (which hasn't been an issue for some time), but it mainly assists in tracking on surfaces that are typically difficult for optical mice (glossy and/or very plain, untextured surfaces)




jafcrr_101.503.276.jpg

Do you have any idea could you,or anyone you know be able to control those things???

I edited my keyboards+mice post with a note on this mouse. It's toward the end, I'd take a look at it if that mouse interests you.

Lara Croft 1993
25th Feb 2013, 14:30
I edited my keyboards+mice post with a note on this mouse. It's toward the end, I'd take a look at it if that mouse interests you.[/QUOTE]


:lol: That mouse scares me!

I was thinking about getting mouse like Metalrocks,this mouse looks like plane cockpit:eek:

Metalrocks
25th Feb 2013, 14:33
thats some fancy mouse there. saw the first one in some stores. but they also charge a lot of money for it.
i think ebay would be a place to look for a left handed mouse. stores are usually selling right handed mice.

Lara Croft 1993
25th Feb 2013, 14:38
thats some fancy mouse there. saw the first one in some stores. but they also charge a lot of money for it.
i think ebay would be a place to look for a left handed mouse. stores are usually selling right handed mice.

Oh God,i totally forgot i have account on eBay,since mouses are pretty much cheap,i may found something,thanks for the info man;)





EDIT:

I was expecting a bit more,but ebay browser gave me only 88 left handed mouses.
I found this one for 50$ not inc. shipping.:


jevuvg_-KGrHqFHJE-FEN1-s-YBBRHk2FiY4Q-60_35.JPG


That was probably best from what i manage to find.

Metalrocks
26th Feb 2013, 11:33
Oh God,i totally forgot i have account on eBay,since mouses are pretty much cheap,i may found something,thanks for the info man;)





EDIT:

I was expecting a bit more,but ebay browser gave me only 88 left handed mouses.
I found this one for 50$ not inc. shipping.:


jevuvg_-KGrHqFHJE-FEN1-s-YBBRHk2FiY4Q-60_35.JPG


That was probably best from what i manage to find.

glad i could help.

yes, i hear a lot of good thing from this brand. and the price sounds good as well. lets hope shipping is not too expensive.

Lara Croft 1993
26th Feb 2013, 12:28
glad i could help.

yes, i hear a lot of good thing from this brand. and the price sounds good as well. lets hope shipping is not too expensive.


Yeah, i heard it's good brand too.
In few days I'll probably buy one.:D

Someonelse
27th Feb 2013, 20:16
Navigation:
PC Hardware (You are here)
Monitors (http://forums.eidosgames.com/showpost.php?p=1864668&postcount=8)
Keyboards and Mice (http://eidosforums.com/showpost.php?p=1865407&postcount=23)
Multi-Monitor Gaming & Super High-End System (Coming Soon)
Assembly Guide (Coming Soon)


High-but-not-highest-end System
This system should have no issues running the game on high settings at 1080p and should be able to handle anything thrown at it for the duration of the upcoming generation of consoles.

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K - $230
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116504


CPU Cooler: Arctic Freezer 13 - $40
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835186039

Replace this with a Hyper Evo 212 Plus which is 10 bucks cheaper and has great reviews.

GPU - AMD: SAPPHIRE 100352-2L Radeon HD 7950 3GB - $300
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814202006


GPU - nVidia: EVGA GeForce 660 Ti 2GB - $295
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130809

I'd personally go for the 7950 because of the 3 gigs of vram and higher memory bus.


RAM: G.SKILL 16GB DDR3 1600 - $94
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231609

16 gigs of ram is overkill for gaming in my opinion, so I'd stick with 8.

Case: Corsair Carbide 400R - $100
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811139008

Change this with an Antec 300 for 40 bucks less

Hard Drive - SSD: Samsung 840 120GB - $110
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820147188

If you're on a budget I'd skip this

Hard Drive - Mechanical: Seagate Barracuda 7200 RPM, 1TB - $75
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822148697

Optical Drive: Lite-On Blu-ray Burner - $70
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827106369

A Blu-ray player isn't really necessary so I would skip this also.

Power Supply: Corsair TX850M 850W Modular - $125
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139029

850 watts is kind of overkill even you do plan on to crossfire I'd say a quality 700 watt would suffice


Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme6 - $142
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157295

This shows up as 160 dollars on the site...I would switch it with a Asrock Extreme 4 which is only $125 and is pretty decent



This should save you around 300 dollars or more and still be pretty powerful.

Martelol
27th Feb 2013, 20:48
This should save you around 300 dollars or more and still be pretty powerful.

Thanks for your suggestions. Here are counter-points to some of them.

Cooler: I actually had the wrong cooler listed - though the one I intended to list is the same price as what I had. The Hyper 212 Evo is a great cooler and is what I have in my own system, but I've done a number of builds with the AC Freezer and have simply found it to be better.

RAM: Yes, 16 is a bit overkill for many people, hence my note about using an 8 gig kit from the cheaper builds if they desire.

Case: Antec 300 is a good case and is just fine if used with the components listed, but due to the front-to-back configuration of hard drives, I have concerns about video card clearance should someone opt for a larger card. I looked at the 300, and passed over it specifically for this reason.

SSD: Agreed. Again, the note, and reason for listing two prices.

Blu-ray drive: Agreed, I need to update the note on that one to let people know they can swap it for a non-bluray or omit it altogether.

Power supply: For the listed cards, you're correct. If someone ops for a higher-end card that requires two PCIe power connectors, however, most 700w power supplies only include 2 or 3 PCIe power connectors total, making Crossfire/SLI require a power supply upgrade in that case.

Motherboard: It was 142 when I listed it, but you're right, the price has gone up. I'll switched it to the Extreme 4.

I also added a note to the top, letting people know they should make changes if they think something might be overkill for their needs.

SheriMccarthy
19th May 2013, 11:54
do you mean key bindings??
as i said, not every game supports these side buttons for some reason. i press the key on the mouse i want to bind and nothing happens. but thats really only on a hand full of games.
anyway, yes, if you find a left handed mouse you can even use these sides buttons for either the cheap led flashlights (http://www.robustbuy.com/led-lighting-gadgets-led-flashlights-c-505_1027_730.html), crouching, aiming...what ever you like to bind it on. like these examples i mentioned earlier for BF3 and MP3. :D

Side buttons does make gaming more exciting activity.But it is fortunate most games does not support it. I have some games supporting these side butons :):)

Daftvirgin
15th Jun 2013, 14:57
I'm browsing the website of my local PC shop. They have 2.5" and 3.5" hard drives listed. What's the difference between these besides the size? Does it impact the required size for your motherboard?

Weemanply109
15th Jun 2013, 16:28
Nice thread. :D