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DemonAlcohol
30th Aug 2012, 18:37
Hello,

I just finished Dues Ex: Human Revolution for PC. I wanted to send you a quick message stating how much I loved the game. Not only was the game play fun and exciting (I loved being able to choose different approaches to a situation), but the story and the issues that it dealt with were very thought provoking and done in a mature and intelligent manner. The team who are responsible for this game have a new lifelong fan, and I eagerly anticipate the next project; whatever it may be.

Thank you,
Bryan Dean

PS: Going to get the original now!

JCpies
30th Aug 2012, 19:27
Hello Bryan Dean, I now know where you live.



I'm just joking. Have fun with the original game.

AlexOfSpades
30th Aug 2012, 20:21
Awww, so nice! The birth of a new fan.

Good luck with the first Deus Ex! Tell us your impressions while you play it!

no149
31st Aug 2012, 22:36
Finished the game few hours ago and feel same as the OP.

Suffice to say, I shed a few tears when Adam enters the Hyron project's room and strokes face of one of those poor female drones attached to that demonicomputer.
Those poor humans exploited as lab mice in the Omega Ranch. :( I admit the game sort of made me feel depressed for all the overall atmosphere and themes it portrays so delicately.

Throughout the game I was saying to myself, it all must be prevented from happening in real life. One can hope...

Lady_Of_The_Vine
1st Sep 2012, 00:46
Tell us your impressions while you play it!

Agreed. It would be nice to read the viewpoint of someone who played DX:HR first and then played the original.

no149
1st Sep 2012, 09:57
I've played only the first level of the original and already feel like it doesn't immerse me as much as HR. Maybe it's the outdated visuals or the music, because I think story-wise, it is not sub par.

Pinky_Powers
1st Sep 2012, 12:12
I've played only the first level of the original and already feel like it doesn't immerse me as much as HR. Maybe it's the outdated visuals or the music, because I think story-wise, it is not sub par.

Story-wise the original is far better than the new game. I would stick with it if you can. Everything about the game is far more interactive than HR, and will surprise you if you let it.

hybridex
1st Sep 2012, 15:07
I agree.. with DX1, it was a bit more interactive. However.. I think you get more bang for the buck with HR. It seems it keeps on getting better when you go back and playthrough HR because you should discover more ways of doing things and finding more things, paths, and locations than before. I can count more than my fingers and toes of how many times I went back through HR, and I haven't gotten bored yet. What's more amusing is the AI in HR sometimes will surprise you on their actions from your previous plays. Either way, both DXs are phenomenal in its own right..

So DemonAl, just like Lays's chips (you just can't have one), you can't just playthrough DXHR just once and fully experience what it has to offer. Congrats on your first completion.. now go back and play it again and again..till you're bored. Haaa!

Falcon084
1st Sep 2012, 15:40
Awww, so nice! The birth of a new fan.

Good luck with the first Deus Ex! Tell us your impressions while you play it!


What he said!:thumb:

Lady_Of_The_Vine
1st Sep 2012, 17:08
Story-wise the original is far better than the new game. I would stick with it if you can. Everything about the game is far more interactive than HR, and will surprise you if you let it.

Agreed. The original game just gets better and better as you continue to play.
It also felt a lot less linear to me than DX:HR, tbh. Just my opinion though. :)

Romeo
1st Sep 2012, 18:08
Gameplay-wise, sure, DX1 is so much more open that Human Revolution it might as well be night and day. But story-wise, I TOTALLY understand where he's coming from. When you can see the pixelation on characters, your mind is constantly saying: This is a videogame. That creates a block to emotional connection.

Hell, going from Invisible War to Deus Ex I had a bit of difficulty getting immersed because of the graphic devolution. I can only imagine how incredibly hard it would be for someone who just came off today's graphics to do so...

JCpies
1st Sep 2012, 18:26
If you've grown up with those 'pixelated characters' they're like friends.

Pinky_Powers
1st Sep 2012, 22:06
If you've grown up with those 'pixelated characters' they're like friends.

This is the glorious truth. :thumb:

Romeo
1st Sep 2012, 22:52
If you've grown up with those 'pixelated characters' they're like friends.
Oh believe me, I'm aware. But you just pointed out what I was saying: If that was your baseline, it's AOK. Morrowind is still incredibly immersive to me, because that's where I came in to the Elder Scrolls. Someone who just started at Skyrim though is probably going to have one hell of a time trying to get past the atrocious graphics in order to get in to the world. Like I said with Deus Ex, I came in at Invisible War first (Yes, yes, get it out of your system), so while the graphical gap wasn't as pronounced, it was still detracting sometimes to see such simple graphics (Dialogue, I'm looking at you). For someone stepping in at DX:HR, the original is almost a completely different animal, because the jerky animations, massive pixelation and unrealistic details (Lighting, shadows, water, reflections, etc) are so jarring that getting in to the setting wont even be a possibility.

nomotog
1st Sep 2012, 22:54
People have blinders on when they think of DX1. The story was wackadudle. I mean it had alien space clones.

sonicsidewinder
2nd Sep 2012, 00:10
Morrowind is still incredibly immersive to me, because that's where I came in to the Elder Scrolls. Someone who just started at Skyrim though is probably going to have one hell of a time trying to get past the atrocious graphics in order to get in to the world.

Huh?! Skyrim is not the 1st gayme?!


heehee

68_pie
2nd Sep 2012, 00:19
I agree.. with DX1, it was a bit more interactive. However.. I think you get more bang for the buck with HR. It seems it keeps on getting better when you go back and playthrough HR because you should discover more ways of doing things and finding more things, paths, and locations than before. I can count more than my fingers and toes of how many times I went back through HR, and I haven't gotten bored yet. What's more amusing is the AI in HR sometimes will surprise you on their actions from your previous plays. Either way, both DXs are phenomenal in its own right..

So DemonAl, just like Lays's chips (you just can't have one), you can't just playthrough DXHR just once and fully experience what it has to offer. Congrats on your first completion.. now go back and play it again and again..till you're bored. Haaa!

I don't know, I played through HR 1.5x and I felt like I pretty much found everything. I've played through DX about once a year since it came out and I still don't feel like I've found everything - I found something new the last time I played it.


But story-wise, I TOTALLY understand where he's coming from. When you can see the pixelation on characters, your mind is constantly saying: This is a videogame. That creates a block to emotional connection.

I don't really understand what that has to do with the story but maybe I'm not comprehending very well.


Someone who just started at Skyrim though is probably going to have one hell of a time trying to get past the atrocious graphics in order to get in to the world. Like I said with Deus Ex, I came in at Invisible War first (Yes, yes, get it out of your system), so while the graphical gap wasn't as pronounced, it was still detracting sometimes to see such simple graphics (Dialogue, I'm looking at you). For someone stepping in at DX:HR, the original is almost a completely different animal, because the jerky animations, massive pixelation and unrealistic details (Lighting, shadows, water, reflections, etc) are so jarring that getting in to the setting wont even be a possibility.

I feel both sorry for those people and incredibly angry with them. It's just so incredibly myopic. It's as bad as people who refuse to watch black and white films.

Shouldn't this be in the "Filthy Casuals" thread? :rasp:

xaduha
2nd Sep 2012, 00:53
When you can see the pixelation on characters, your mind is constantly saying: This is a videogame. That creates a block to emotional connection.


AuvbZpH1QuE

Maybe there is a way around it, some gaming abstinence and/or some gradual retro gaming?
And a guide like http://kentie.net/article/dxguide/ always helps.

Things are not that bad for DX or Morrowind, but take a look at a game like System Shock 2
http://www.gog.com/wishlist/games#order=votes_total
No proper way to buy, not user-friendly at all

ColBashar
2nd Sep 2012, 01:11
I think I understand where Romeo is coming from. There are some games, some very good games I'm sure, that I just have difficulty getting in to as a result of the passage of time. I feel very fortunate to have come from time when having sixteen colours on the screen (cyan and magenta FTW) was considered high tech. Even so, I don't think I'll ever really play System Shock just because the clunky interface feels torturous after playing Deus Ex. Likewise I can see why people could have difficulty getting in to Deus Ex after experiencing the polish and sophistication of Human Revolution.

With regard to developing an emotional attachment to characters, though, I have difficulty seeing graphics pose an obstruction. Look at cartoons or anime, they don't have to look realistic or even be rendered particularly well to draw an emotional response or be accepted as characters. It's more a matter of the writing and how it is executed. A stark example of this is the Companion Cube in Portal. It has -no- human characteristics or features whatsoever, it's just an inanimate object. But because of the way Glados anthropomorphizes it through the sheer force of monologue, it's developed into an actual character. I've even seen pictures of people dressed up in a Companion Cube costume.

With regard to Deus Ex's story, as much a fan as I am even I have to admit it's wonky. It's just consistently well put together wonkiness. The real strength isn't so much in the story, but in how it is executed. It's the characters that I find compelling and provide the necessary grounding to keep the story from going haywire. I think that's part of why so many who play Deus Ex for the first time don't really start to appreciate the game until they complete Liberty Island and get to UNATCO HQ.

Romeo
2nd Sep 2012, 02:30
I feel both sorry for those people and incredibly angry with them. It's just so incredibly myopic. It's as bad as people who refuse to watch black and white films.
I think that's a fairly poor response. It isn't peoples' faults what they enjoy, or what's important to them. I absolutely adore the realism and feel of Forza Motorsport. To me, having something that I can fairly accurately use for telemetry, and that feels like my local racing does is the number one thing. I wouldn't pity or be angry with someone who adores Mario Kart or Need for Speed, however.

Besides that, I feel like you may be misinterpreting me. I'm not saying "graphixx r teh most emportant thing about teh game." Rather, if you're accustomed to Deus Ex (Or any game) looking sharp-as-a-tack, it is a subconscious block when you see something that looks... Well, fake. Let's compare two situations: When you see "Itchy and Scratchy" on the Simpsons, your mind doesn't see "a cat dying". It sees "cartoon". Now, if that same scene played out with damn-near photorealistic graphics, your mind would be recoiling in horror - it becomes "real".

I think I understand where Romeo is coming from. There are some games, some very good games I'm sure, that I just have difficulty getting in to as a result of the passage of time. I feel very fortunate to have come from time when having sixteen colours on the screen (cyan and magenta FTW) was considered high tech. Even so, I don't think I'll ever really play System Shock just because the clunky interface feels torturous after playing Deus Ex. Likewise I can see why people could have difficulty getting in to Deus Ex after experiencing the polish and sophistication of Human Revolution.

With regard to developing an emotional attachment to characters, though, I have difficulty seeing graphics pose an obstruction. Look at cartoons or anime, they don't have to look realistic or even be rendered particularly well to draw an emotional response or be accepted as characters. It's more a matter of the writing and how it is executed. A stark example of this is the Companion Cube in Portal. It has -no- human characteristics or features whatsoever, it's just an inanimate object. But because of the way Glados anthropomorphizes it through the sheer force of monologue, it's developed into an actual character. I've even seen pictures of people dressed up in a Companion Cube costume.

With regard to Deus Ex's story, as much a fan as I am even I have to admit it's wonky. It's just consistently well put together wonkiness. The real strength isn't so much in the story, but in how it is executed. It's the characters that I find compelling and provide the necessary grounding to keep the story from going haywire. I think that's part of why so many who play Deus Ex for the first time don't really start to appreciate the game until they complete Liberty Island and get to UNATCO HQ.
I agree and disagree. There is no doubt that emotional impact, story and characters can all be well-done without looking... Normal. However, I will always say that "less impressive" graphics negatively impact those elements. Mass Effect 1 is in no way realistic - we have ridiculous aliens, robots and your homebase is a space-ship. And that's fine, one can still get immersed, because it still follows the rules of reality - animations are still smooth and realistic, graphical clarity is fairly sharp, things are reflected properly, etc. The only times one gets booted from the immersion is when something "unreal" happens. Someone's head is facing backwards in a conversation, something is shaking wildly, textures pop in. Things that aren't an aesthetic choice, but ruin the immersion. Now, imagine if someone passed you Mass Effect 2 and suddenly it was 8-bit, had no animations and all that. You'd have a much, much harder time getting in to it. Because you have Mass Effect 1 to compare it to, and you know how "the reality" works. That's your standard.



As I've said, it is different for an original player. If you started on Deus Ex way back when, that was your basis of graphics, so you didn't have that barrier of entry to get immersed. But if you're used to the modern graphics of Human Revolution, seeing someone's mouth simply open and close without any animations takes you out of the experience, immediately. The story, emotion and characters simply wont resonate to the same degree, because they look utterly ridiculous in comparison.

ColBashar
2nd Sep 2012, 04:29
When you see "Itchy and Scratchy" on the Simpsons, your mind doesn't see "a cat dying". It sees "cartoon". Now, if that same scene played out with damn-near photorealistic graphics, your mind would be recoiling in horror - it becomes "real".

Contrast that to just about every Adam Sandler movie ever made, where in physical violence or human injury are used to evoke laughter. You can't get more realistic imagery than live action video yet my mind can still abstractly appreciate that the visual stimuli I am receiving is just pretend, make-believe. Likewise, I'm sure I could find an example of animation, and not particularly good animation, that would cause me to "recoil in horror". Heck, I've read books that I've found disturbing enough to close the cover before finishing. The visual stimuli alone does not define my emotional reaction, what does is the context in which I am receiving that stimuli and the manner by which it is designed to evoke a response.

I don't put so much weight in graphics because what I see on the screen is really just a placeholder, or an avatar for the character who exists in my imagination. I don't need photorealistic graphics because my mind will fill in the blanks. Heck, I have no idea what you look like, Romeo, but I have a visualisation of you in my mind's eye. I'm sure it's -completely- wrong, but I can assure you it's a heck of a lot better rendered than anything in DXHR. Just so if we were to meet in Deus Ex multiplayer and have this conversation.

But I'll grant you this much, superior graphics does offer game developers an additional tool, namely in providing atmosphere, or what you might call "immersion". But it's one tool among many and not necessarily a defining one.

Just look at something like Skyrim. I think the graphics in that game are some of the best I've ever seen, even better when modded, but they don't do anything to make me feel more attached to the characters. Seeing Paul's cadaver in the MJ12 base moves me far more than the death of anybody in Skyrim, no matter how visceral. The only character I actually like from Skyrim, and am liable to even remember ten years hence, is Parthanax, the dragon. I'm not sure how well "realism" applies to a fantastic creature, but I still sympathise with the character.

no149
2nd Sep 2012, 12:37
Well wow, look what I did to this thread. *smug* ;D

Let me get something straight. I agree the graphics aren't everything, hell just read my post on the hive thread to understand how I play games. There, I said that story for me includes not only the script, but also the music and the atmosphere, plus the character development; Given the mentioned features are done well, realistic looking graphics certainly helps the player feel the game's atmosphere more deeply to a level of total immersion (case in point, I got sort of depressed and mesmerized everytime I played HR). Now, the MOST important element in such a complete game, which the lack of it would lower the game's attachment to half level or less, is of course the story telling. This element comprises of all the elements mentioned above, it is developed with the help of them.
In HR, it is done top notch , same goes to Max Payne 1 and 2 even to this day. And story telling is much more than the sequence of events.

You can't downplay the role of cinematic scenes of HR which help in developing player's attachment to the game's atmosphere, which by the way, are another projection of great graphics. Take the beginning scene of HR and compare it to that of the original game. The voices sound more real and human to ears, the visuals' difference is just night and day. I can feel the game with all my senses.
I just can't feel the same level of tension in the beginning scenes of DX, the voices sound robotic to me and void of feeling and the poor graphics don't help improve the realism either. It pretty much ruins the story telling for me. Likewise, in Max Payne I totally enjoyed the way the story was presented, it just pulled me into the games atmosphere ad because if this I literally cried at the end of the 2nd game.

Both of these awesome games have one thing in common: heavenly AWE.SOME music. And this is one important element in developing an immersive story telling.

In a book, there are no visuals , no graphics no sounds, only and only the script in your hands. You create the visuals and you create the sounds in your head to go by the storyline and in the end it all can add up to a compelling story telling provided the storyline itself is fine.

Something of note just occured to me: I did play the original game before playing HR, and went past the first two levels as far as I can remember. YET, I simply couldn't attach my self to the game, hence I decied to buy HR and play the original only after finishing it (another deciding factor for me was the timeline of events in the two games).

That being said, I might try to play more of the original game and see if it can hold me into it. But I really doubt that, because simply better gameplay (meaning the interaction between the game objects and the player) for me isn't of utmost importance. It's very fun when you can throw almost any object in DX for instance, but if pure fun was the principal factor for me when deciding to play a game, I would be playing Super Mario every day. I really don't know how to explain it more so some of you can understand, I mean when talking about the game with my family, you know what word I used in place of 'game'? You guessed it, movie; I couldn't just refer to it as a game. Maybe that's why the masters at hollywood have decided on producing a movie based on HR.

68_pie
2nd Sep 2012, 13:53
I think that's a fairly poor response. It isn't peoples' faults what they enjoy, or what's important to them. I absolutely adore the realism and feel of Forza Motorsport. To me, having something that I can fairly accurately use for telemetry, and that feels like my local racing does is the number one thing. I wouldn't pity or be angry with someone who adores Mario Kart or Need for Speed, however.

You're comparing different game series. I'm saying that I would have no problem playing the N64 version of Mario Kart even if the first version I played was the one on the Wii.


Besides that, I feel like you may be misinterpreting me. I'm not saying "graphixx r teh most emportant thing about teh game." Rather, if you're accustomed to Deus Ex (Or any game) looking sharp-as-a-tack, it is a subconscious block when you see something that looks... Well, fake.

I guess I don't have that problem - I'm more concerned with the internal consistency. In my head I can think "this is a game from 2000, this is what it should look like, okay now let's play the game". TBH as soon as I play the game for a while I pretty much forget graphics entirrely.


I agree and disagree. There is no doubt that emotional impact, story and characters can all be well-done without looking... Normal. However, I will always say that "less impressive" graphics negatively impact those elements. Mass Effect 1 is in no way realistic - we have ridiculous aliens, robots and your homebase is a space-ship. And that's fine, one can still get immersed, because it still follows the rules of reality - animations are still smooth and realistic, graphical clarity is fairly sharp, things are reflected properly, etc. The only times one gets booted from the immersion is when something "unreal" happens. Someone's head is facing backwards in a conversation, something is shaking wildly, textures pop in. Things that aren't an aesthetic choice, but ruin the immersion. Now, imagine if someone passed you Mass Effect 2 and suddenly it was 8-bit, had no animations and all that. You'd have a much, much harder time getting in to it. Because you have Mass Effect 1 to compare it to, and you know how "the reality" works. That's your standard.

But Mass Effect 2 is a sequel, thus that would be a regression and much more stark. If you played ME2 first then ME I don't see why there would be an issue.


As I've said, it is different for an original player. If you started on Deus Ex way back when, that was your basis of graphics, so you didn't have that barrier of entry to get immersed. But if you're used to the modern graphics of Human Revolution, seeing someone's mouth simply open and close without any animations takes you out of the experience, immediately. The story, emotion and characters simply wont resonate to the same degree, because they look utterly ridiculous in comparison.

I guess I don't have that problem. Graphics have never had a significant impact on immersion for me.




You can't downplay the role of cinematic scenes of HR

This is where I should have stopped reading.


I just can't feel the same level of tension in the beginning scenes of DX, the voices sound robotic to me and void of feeling and the poor graphics don't help improve the realism either. It pretty much ruins the story telling for me. Likewise, in Max Payne I totally enjoyed the way the story was presented, it just pulled me into the games atmosphere ad because if this I literally cried at the end of the 2nd game.

So bad graphics in DX are a problem but bad graphics in MP aren't? :scratch:



That being said, I might try to play more of the original game and see if it can hold me into it. But I really doubt that, because simply better gameplay (meaning the interaction between the game objects and the player) for me isn't of utmost importance.

So gameplay, the most important aspect of playing a game isn't important to you...


I really don't know how to explain it more so some of you can understand, I mean when talking about the game with my family, you know what word I used in place of 'game'? You guessed it, movie; I couldn't just refer to it as a game.

Banging. My. Head. Against. A. Wall.

I don't understand why you are playing games.

ColBashar
2nd Sep 2012, 14:54
Okay, before this gets out of hand, let's just remind ourselves of the fact that different people play different games for different reasons. Or, more to the point, people play the -same- games for different reasons.

I can completely understand why a person who has played Human Revolution might be disappointed in Deus Ex and I can understand how and why the dated graphics play a part in that. DXHR has really, -really- good atmosphere. I'm not sure it will stand the test of time versus, say, VTMB, but it has more spit and polish in 2011 than Deus Ex had even in 2000. If you're coming in to these games looking for that "immersive" atmosphere, then I would agree, I think DXHR is going to win out under just about any circumstance.

The argument I'm making here is that not everybody puts the same weight in that atmosphere as others. It depends on your individual perspective and what it is you're looking to get out of the game. Moreover, that perspective changes from instance to instance so that some games I may place more value on atmosphere to carry the game while others I can get just as much enjoyment out of an interface developed with GDI+.

For people like 68_pie and myself, the dated graphics don't detract from Deus Ex as much as they apparently do for Romeo and no149. Hey, I have no quarrel with that. I'm sure there are plenty of games you two think are the bomb that I just wouldn't find as interesting or engaging. Different strokes for different folks. But I get a little touchy when people make blanket statements based on their own personal experiences. Graphics can certainly help as one component in generating a visceral experience (no194 brings up music and sound which are also important parts) but if I'm not going in to the game for a visceral experience then DX1's dated technology isn't going to phase me.

no149
2nd Sep 2012, 14:55
This is where I should have stopped reading.


Whatever. They do have a role in making me think of the characters as real humans. Just like movies.


So bad graphics in DX are a problem but bad graphics in MP aren't? :scratch:


You didn't get my point. MP graphics and specially the 2nd game is superior to the original DX, but that's besides my point.


So gameplay, the most important aspect of playing a game isn't important to you...

Don't twist my words. I never said that. Gameplay alone may not be the most important element in a game for me, and it really depends on the game. For GTA it is, but for Deus Ex it is just important.



Banging. My. Head. Against. A. Wall.

I don't understand why you are playing games.

Bang harder.


...
Thank you. You summed up my view very well. :) I mean, GTA:Vice City has dated graphics comparatively and little weight to its characters and atmosphere yet I very much enjoy playing it.

hybridex
2nd Sep 2012, 15:18
Oh yeah! Looks like we took this one out to the atmosphere :lol: All DemonA did was to introduce himself as a new DXHR conqueror. Bryan, look what you had started.. Haaa! You can't pit DX against DX. That's civil war, people! like pitting brothers against brothers. :nut: Both versions are a masterpiece in its own rights.

no149
2nd Sep 2012, 15:52
Well wow, look what I did to this thread. *smug* ;D

Let me get something straight. I agree the graphics aren't everything, hell just read my post on the hive thread to understand how I play games. There, I said that story for me includes not only the script, but also the music and the atmosphere, plus the character development; Given the mentioned features are done well, realistic looking graphics certainly helps the player feel the game's atmosphere more deeply to a level of total immersion (case in point, I got sort of depressed and mesmerized everytime I played HR).
I should correct myself here. A deep atmosphere to make you feel mesmerized as if you live in the game, stems from all those elements I mentioned, combined: the music and voices, the characters development, the storyline, and as important as the others, the GFX; In the future, another element will be virtual reality.

Smoke Screen
2nd Sep 2012, 18:26
Imho DXHR is a to some extent well done timely rehash of the original gamemechanics.
Overall a couple doubtable design decisions and some flaws in the gameplay tarnishing
the gaming experience somewhat but not in a way that it pulls the fun out of it.
It surely is a very welcomed break from the sickening boring standard formulars nowaday
peddled as fps,but is it on that ground alone a masterpiece ? Certainly not. Simply be-
cause it took more than a decade for the industry to make a enjoyable clone and it
fails to bring something new or at least better to the table except for technicalities.
With DXHR the devs did a lot more right than wrong. Anyway personaly i find that games
like Bioshock or Dark Messiah of Might and Magic are a notch better rounded and betatested.

EricaLeeV
5th Sep 2012, 17:41
Just to put my 2 cents in on the old DX graphics thing.

I think it's a bunch of hoo-ha. I did not give a crap about the graphics when I first played the original Deus Ex...which was roughly 2 years ago.


I think the story in the original is far superior as is the depth of gameplay. DXHR is great and all...I mean the original trailers for it got me interested in Deus Ex in the first place, but the original beats it hands down for me in most departments. The graphics do not look great on the original, but for me it wasn't a deal breaker at all.

JCpies
5th Sep 2012, 19:53
Human Revolution is superior in graphics, sound engineering and art/design.

I hope one day media makes use of other senses, I'd love to walk through Heng Sha and smell the food cooking, the pollution, the perfume and the sewers.

Okay, forget the sewers it would be a pain disabling the 'smell' feature whenever you had to go in the sewers. I wouldn't mind the occasional patch of urine in an alleyway though.

EricaLeeV
5th Sep 2012, 19:59
Human Revolution is superior in graphics, sound engineering and art/design.

I hope one day media makes use of other senses, I'd love to walk through Heng Sha and smell the food cooking, the pollution, the perfume and the sewers.

Okay, forget the sewers it would be a pain disabling the 'smell' feature whenever you had to go in the sewers. I wouldn't mind the occasional patch of urine in an alleyway though.

In the future we iz teh video games. We are gonna get so fat on candy bars.


I really like the art and design aspect of Human Revolution. It really makes me want to see what can be done with the original...but that game is too much to be remade today properly.

JCpies
5th Sep 2012, 20:14
I just went back on and gave Human Revolution a spin for fifteen minutes just marvelling Heng Sha locations and smashing stuff.

Anyone recommend any games that have environments on Human Revolution's level of intricacy and beauty and genius? Don't say Mirror's Edge, I already love Mirror's Edge, but even ME doesn't come close to Human Revolution in my opinion.

God, I can't wait for the sequel.

It makes me want to apply to join EM, not that I would be able to contribute anything useful aside from tea and motivation.

hybridex
6th Sep 2012, 03:14
God, I can't wait for the sequel.

It makes me want to apply to join EM, not that I would be able to contribute anything useful aside from tea and motivation.

I'm there with you.. Gave a thought many times about a career change and heading back to learn game development in the media arts. Then, I realize how long the schooling would take.. isn't there a fast-track on-the-job training available??

Senka
6th Sep 2012, 04:27
I'm there with you.. Gave a thought many times about a career change and heading back to learn game development in the media arts. Then, I realize how long the schooling would take.. isn't there a fast-track on-the-job training available??

No, but there are hundreds/thousands of self taught artists all aiming to get into the industry. 'schools' for game dev / 3d are generally frowned upon too. Okay if you've got the money but usually poor training anyway (from what I read). You'd be better off spending the money on training dvds from professionals, like from gnomon workshop. If you want to try, download trials and tutorials of 3d modelling programs (or whatever), try tutorials, browse the net for guides, etc.

hybridex
7th Sep 2012, 03:44
Kinda difficult to believe one can get good at game design from watching self-taught DVDs. I figured game design and computer animation is an artform, much like hand drawing and painting. Not to sell myself short, but I'm much better with hands-on and live person instruction. Much appreciated with your information, however.

Senka
7th Sep 2012, 04:28
DVD's, tutorials etc are helping you get started, the majority of it is working hard to perfect your skills. If you're interested, here is a thread where artists have posted their own stories of how they got into the industry:

http://www.polycount.com/forum/showthread.php?t=89972

Generally browsing polycount will probably give you a lot of info on starting out too.

JCpies
7th Sep 2012, 09:58
Kinda difficult to believe one can get good at game design from watching self-taught DVDs.

I don't find it hard to believe.

Sounds like you're suffering from the pitiful education systems used in a lot of countries.

hybridex
7th Sep 2012, 23:14
Not at all.. depends on who's teaching or the instructor that makes or break the education system. Again, I'm more hands-on and much prefer live instructions where you can interact face-to-face with the instructor. Even the online courses, which is the only options I'm afforded right now, is kicking my butt big time. Maybe the increasing effort of online classes is attributing to the pitiful education system.. Haaa!

MaxxQ1
8th Sep 2012, 02:41
I agree.. with DX1, it was a bit more interactive. However.. I think you get more bang for the buck with HR. It seems it keeps on getting better when you go back and playthrough HR because you should discover more ways of doing things and finding more things, paths, and locations than before. I can count more than my fingers and toes of how many times I went back through HR, and I haven't gotten bored yet. What's more amusing is the AI in HR sometimes will surprise you on their actions from your previous plays. Either way, both DXs are phenomenal in its own right..

In a way*, I have to disagree with HR giving more bang for the buck. I got it on release day, played through it once, and tried to play it again a couple weeks ago. No dice. Couldn't get into it enough to keep going, even though I was trying different things. OTOH, I keep replaying DX *at least* once a year, and like someone mentioned above, I'm *still* finding new things, or going through dialogue options I don't recall having seen before.

HR isn't as bad as IW, but I don't think I'll be playing it again.

*What I mean by this is that I basically got DX:HR for free, since I took advantage of the GameStop fiasco where they offered to refund the money people paid when they pre-ordered the game (GS opened the cases and removed flyers for some online game service that was competing with their own, then sold the games as "new"). From an actual cost standpoint, yeah, HR was worth everything I paid (then got back), but I'd take the original as a desert island game long before HR, and there are at least 5 other games I would also take before I started considering HR.


So DemonAl, just like Lays's chips (you just can't have one), you can't just playthrough DXHR just once and fully experience what it has to offer. Congrats on your first completion.. now go back and play it again and again..till you're bored. Haaa!

For me, one full playthrough, and another couple hours for a second attempt was enough for me to get bored.

nomotog
8th Sep 2012, 04:26
I also haven't been replaying HR as much as I use to replay DX. It's a common thing it seems. You can blame that on the fact that there is less content. I place the blame on the burden on knowledge. It took me three playthrughs to learn that shotguns can "open doors" in DX. With HR, I already knew that it would work, so I couldn't discover it. I basically started HR three plays in.