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gustavoams
21st Aug 2012, 15:49
Well, I just finished the game, and I am curious to see what other ppl think about the ending.
For me it was kinda of a let down, the events were a bit confusing at first and not really what I expected, I thought even if the whole game wasnt great as it could be , the ending would redeem the rest of it, but I got disappointed.
So what do you guys think about it? Lets discuss the ending and the game itself.

PS: dont tell any spoilers from XIII-2 bc I still have to buy it, and I dont care if there is a thread with that topic already because I bet it is old and no one sees it anymore so I am starting this one.

Saria3
21st Aug 2012, 16:58
I personally thought the ending was very good. I played/beat it shortly after it came out, so from my memory - I really liked how Lightning was happy and accepted Serah and Snow, and the fact that Dajh was ok and everything. Sure the Fang n Vanille sitch. kinda sucked, but all in all I think they atoned for "failing" before, so-to-speak.



and I agree that some parts of the game could have been better - I actually fell asleep mid-battle a few times, but apart from that (and maybe the lack of "open-worldness") I didn't think it was too bad of a game.






I dunno, what was it particularly in the end that dissapointed you? maybe there's something I don't remember?

and spoiler-free, I personally liked XIII-2 better, so maybe that one wont dissapoint you? :P

gustavoams
21st Aug 2012, 17:57
yeah, I dont think is a bad game either, not even close to how bad ppl like to say this game is. What disappointed me in the ending, i think it is what disappointed me in the story as a whole, the "villain" isnt much appealing like previous FF bad guys I mean, Bathandelus goal is basically to get you to kill him and all of his kind, how menancing is that? but in the end specifically, the last battle against Orphan is extremely easy for a last boss, and the way things happen there dont really pass the feeling I think it should.

Zench-XIII
21st Aug 2012, 18:10
You didn't get Barthandelus' true goal apparently. He wanted the Pulse l'Cie to kill Orphan, the battery of Cocoon. By doing this, millions of people would've died; now the reason to this is because the fal'Cie wanted to open the door to the Unseen Realm (mentioned in XIII-2) with the hopes of reuniting with The Maker

gustavoams
21st Aug 2012, 18:51
Well that doesn't change the fact that he unites with orphan or turns into it, other aspect of the ending I didn't really understand. wich leads to his death the same way. But I see your point, thanks for the answer.

member_10338739
21st Aug 2012, 19:00
As much as Bathandelus' kept coming back, and I found his logic hard to follow at times, one thing I did quite like was that at least it was a different take on a villain. What was good about Bathandelus, and for me the ending, was that he had the power of the whole society of coccoon behind him. Functionally, yeah, the battle was just a boss fight. But as for the story, I found the wide-spread cultural change impressive.

YoshiKatYoko
24th Aug 2012, 14:36
Barthandelus was trying to force the 6 ICie's to fulfill their focus and bring destruction to the Cocoon.

Kuja9001
13th Nov 2012, 02:14
If so, why?

member_10628951
14th Nov 2012, 19:28
Can you explain a little more what you mean by that?

Kuja9001
14th Nov 2012, 20:42
Can you explain a little more what you mean by that?



People claim 13's ending is a DEM because Etro decrystallized the party.

member_10687105
16th Nov 2012, 04:05
I don't, but I also understand why many people do. It's an event that the party had no direct control over, caused by a goddess who is barely mentioned in the course of the main plotline. For anyone who simply played the main plotline, the intervention would come out of nowhere, and thus appear to be a Deus Ex Machnia.


However, the game does foreshadow the intervention of Etro, primarily through the analects that can be obtained by completing various missions. We learn that Etro's intervention prevented Fang and Vanille from destroying Cocoon during the War of Transgression:



Ragnarok took wing; made to smite Cocoon, and thereby deliver us our


everlasting peace. But Her Providence would not let it be.


The Goddess pitied the fools who so blindly bowed to Lindzei's will, and so
She robbed Ragnarok of power, putting the l'Cie to an early crystal sleep,
Focus yet incomplete.

By inference, this tells us that Etro's intervention is the cause of Fang's scorched brand.


We also learn that Etro is motivated by pity and compassion, and that she is the source of the Eidolons that are sent to rekindle hope for l'Cie who despair.



Her Providence sought nothing.


Her Providence made nothing.
She but looked on, silent in Her sorrow.


The Goddess pitied mortals, destined as they were to die, and so She deigned
to intervene in the hour of their greatest peril. She averted cataclysm that
was to be, and put to rest the ones who would have robbed so many of what
time fate had ordained.


Her compassion did not end at this.


The Goddess pitied also those subjected to that fate of Focus, crueler still
than death. To them She sent Her messengers, to deliver hope when all was
lost.

The analects also explain that great amounts of death can open the passage to the unseen realm where Etro dwells.


With that foreshadowing, it's predictable that Etro would be moved to again intervene when all hope seemed lost. Her actions are motivated by the actions of the party, and are not a random event out of nowhere.


It's true that the party succeeds only because of divine aid, but that aid is both something they earn through their efforts and their determination, and something that can be somewhat anticipated from past events. Therefore I don't see the intervention as contrived, nor as unexpected, and Etro is not a previously unknown force. Those elements prevent the act from being a Deus Ex Machina.


t~

Kuja9001
16th Nov 2012, 09:09
I don't, but I also understand why many people do. It's an event that the party had no direct control over, caused by a goddess who is barely mentioned in the course of the main plotline. For anyone who simply played the main plotline, the intervention would come out of nowhere, and thus appear to be a Deus Ex Machnia.


However, the game does foreshadow the intervention of Etro, primarily through the analects that can be obtained by completing various missions. We learn that Etro's intervention prevented Fang and Vanille from destroying Cocoon during the War of Transgression:



Ragnarok took wing; made to smite Cocoon, and thereby deliver us our


everlasting peace. But Her Providence would not let it be.


The Goddess pitied the fools who so blindly bowed to Lindzei's will, and so
She robbed Ragnarok of power, putting the l'Cie to an early crystal sleep,
Focus yet incomplete.

By inference, this tells us that Etro's intervention is the cause of Fang's scorched brand.


We also learn that Etro is motivated by pity and compassion, and that she is the source of the Eidolons that are sent to rekindle hope for l'Cie who despair.



Her Providence sought nothing.


Her Providence made nothing.
She but looked on, silent in Her sorrow.


The Goddess pitied mortals, destined as they were to die, and so She deigned
to intervene in the hour of their greatest peril. She averted cataclysm that
was to be, and put to rest the ones who would have robbed so many of what
time fate had ordained.


Her compassion did not end at this.


The Goddess pitied also those subjected to that fate of Focus, crueler still
than death. To them She sent Her messengers, to deliver hope when all was
lost.

The analects also explain that great amounts of death can open the passage to the unseen realm where Etro dwells.


With that foreshadowing, it's predictable that Etro would be moved to again intervene when all hope seemed lost. Her actions are motivated by the actions of the party, and are not a random event out of nowhere.


It's true that the party succeeds only because of divine aid, but that aid is both something they earn through their efforts and their determination, and something that can be somewhat anticipated from past events. Therefore I don't see the intervention as contrived, nor as unexpected, and Etro is not a previously unknown force. Those elements prevent the act from being a Deus Ex Machina.


t~









Yes!!!, an intelligent post.

akjhu_
25th Feb 2013, 14:05
I agree. Bart was a different take on a villain. Some of my favorite characters in FF are the villians, but Bart certainly isn't one of them. The ending? Well, I can't really comment since I've played 13-2 and obviously, the end to this story won't be revealed until this fall, hopefully.

iTables
3rd Dec 2013, 01:17
The ending gave me what i wanted. Even though i kinda knew what was going to happen...

Serah and Dajh came back from crystal.

But what i didn't expect was Lightning and the other to come back from crystal. That got me good, in XIII-2 they explain why.

kadosho
25th Mar 2014, 19:47
XIII has been a humbling adventure, I have enjoyed the FF series since the beginning, and it has never left me with negative feelings. Nice to see some positive thoughts regarding the crossroads that this series saga takes on.