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AdobeArtist
6th Oct 2009, 20:05
With all the news of the next Tomb Raider movie focusing on Lara’s origin story, it got me to wondering what she was like when she was younger. But more importantly, what was she like before her tragic accident.

I know we’ve seen some glimpses of her childhood (like in the Legend flashback) but how much do we really know of her from back then as to what we know of her now as a world famous adventuring archaeologist?

Was she always so noble? Even in late childhood, was she well behaved, properly mannered, eager to learn, and overall a model British lady? Or perhaps one might speculate, that given her privileged upbringing, that she more likely might have been naïve, self-absorbed, possessing a sense of entitlement, ignorant (in the academic sense of the word, not derogatory), and dare I say… spoiled?

Now by spoiled I don’t mean a petulant child demanding every little thing she wanted, because she could expect to get away with such behaviour. More like having grown up surrounded by so much comfort and luxury, that she’d simply be used to a life of ease and therefore taken so much for granted, her innocence making her oblivious to the more rigorous truths of life that the common working class is so familiar with.

I guess what I’m driving at is; was Lara always on her way to becoming be the charming, sophisticated, intelligent, cultured philanthropist, strong, courageous, and independent woman we know her to be, regardless if the fateful tragedy happened or not?

Or did it actually take something like that, of having everything she took for granted violently taken away from her, to open her eyes and mature her towards being that aforementioned lady of culture and sophistication, with a thirst for knowledge?

What do the rest of you think?

Oh and I’m not meaning to generalize rich people either. I know better that they’re not all spoiled and self-absorbed, and many are charitable out of genuine interest in giving back to their communities.

_Love2Raid_
6th Oct 2009, 20:21
Or did it actually take something like that, of having everything she took for granted violently taken away from her, to open her eyes and mature her towards being that aforementioned lady of culture and sophistication, with a thirst for knowledge?


This. ;)

naraku
6th Oct 2009, 20:40
With all the news of the next Tomb Raider movie focusing on Lara’s origin story, it got me to wondering what she was like when she was younger. But more importantly, what was she like before her tragic accident.

I know we’ve seen some glimpses of her childhood (like in the Legend flashback) but how much do we really know of her from back then as to what we know of her now as a world famous adventuring archaeologist?

Was she always so noble? Even in late childhood, was she well behaved, properly mannered, eager to learn, and overall a model British lady? Or perhaps one might speculate, that given her privileged upbringing, that she more likely might have been naïve, self-absorbed, possessing a sense of entitlement, ignorant (in the academic sense of the word, not derogatory), and dare I say… spoiled?

Now by spoiled I don’t mean a petulant child demanding every little thing she wanted, because she could expect to get away with such behaviour. More like having grown up surrounded by so much comfort and luxury, that she’d simply be used to a life of ease and therefore taken so much for granted, her innocence making her oblivious to the more rigorous truths of life that the common working class is so familiar with.

I guess what I’m driving at is; was Lara always on her way to becoming be the charming, sophisticated, intelligent, cultured philanthropist, strong, courageous, and independent woman we know her to be, regardless if the fateful tragedy happened or not?

Or did it actually take something like that, of having everything she took for granted violently taken away from her, to open her eyes and mature her towards being that aforementioned lady of culture and sophistication, with a thirst for knowledge?

What do the rest of you think?

Oh and I’m not meaning to generalize rich people either. I know better that they’re not all spoiled and self-absorbed, and many are charitable out of genuine interest in giving back to their communities.

Well she's not just a rich person, mind you we've never seen her manage money. She's a Countess, with a Heraldry title. That comes with responsibility, and I would imagine, Lara being taught to be courageous and a cultured philantropist from the cradle. But that is not to say she would have never thrown a tantrum every now and then. ;)

Jason Miller
6th Oct 2009, 21:08
With all the news of the next Tomb Raider movie focusing on Lara’s origin story, it got me to wondering what she was like when she was younger. But more importantly, what was she like before her tragic accident.

I know we’ve seen some glimpses of her childhood (like in the Legend flashback) but how much do we really know of her from back then as to what we know of her now as a world famous adventuring archaeologist?

Was she always so noble? Even in late childhood, was she well behaved, properly mannered, eager to learn, and overall a model British lady? Or perhaps one might speculate, that given her privileged upbringing, that she more likely might have been naïve, self-absorbed, possessing a sense of entitlement, ignorant (in the academic sense of the word, not derogatory), and dare I say… spoiled?

Now by spoiled I don’t mean a petulant child demanding every little thing she wanted, because she could expect to get away with such behaviour. More like having grown up surrounded by so much comfort and luxury, that she’d simply be used to a life of ease and therefore taken so much for granted, her innocence making her oblivious to the more rigorous truths of life that the common working class is so familiar with.

I guess what I’m driving at is; was Lara always on her way to becoming be the charming, sophisticated, intelligent, cultured philanthropist, strong, courageous, and independent woman we know her to be, regardless if the fateful tragedy happened or not?

Or did it actually take something like that, of having everything she took for granted violently taken away from her, to open her eyes and mature her towards being that aforementioned lady of culture and sophistication, with a thirst for knowledge?

What do the rest of you think?

Oh and I’m not meaning to generalize rich people either. I know better that they’re not all spoiled and self-absorbed, and many are charitable out of genuine interest in giving back to their communities.

Honestly, this is the perfect chance to give Lara a lot more sex appeal. Since all of the fans have been preventing her from getting even a single boyfriend since she turned 20.:lol:

Ants_27_
6th Oct 2009, 21:38
I think she would have stamped her foot and whatnot, which to some degree would be quite humorous to see. But I highly doubt Lara was a well behaved child as far as childhood goes.;) But I do believe it took a 'event' to stop her taking everything for granted, like most people do during their childhood's.

Max 28
7th Oct 2009, 04:25
In Core's games she was into adventure, busting out from her life where she was smothered by her aristocracy. I think that's what it was, maybe I came up with that myself, or was it only after being inspired by Von Croy?

In the movies she was all eager to learn from her father.

In Legend she seemed babied to me. "You never have to be cold my Lara. Not if you don't want to be."
She would want to be cold? :confused:

Pulse
9th Oct 2009, 03:48
I think having her world ripped apart did it. Her mother died (NOT really! :o) and she probably matured a little bit and decided she'd go on digs with her father. THen when he died she made herself grow up, so she could be strong.

oraclebop
9th Oct 2009, 09:14
Analyzing the cutscenes of her as a child, I think she grew up with the privilege, but was more entranced by what her father did. She was probably curious (Yetis and when she touched Excalibur) and strong willed. (Trek back to Civilization)

AdobeArtist
18th Oct 2009, 17:53
I think she would have stamped her foot and whatnot, which to some degree would be quite humorous to see. But I highly doubt Lara was a well behaved child as far as childhood goes.;) But I do believe it took a 'event' to stop her taking everything for granted, like most people do during their childhood's.

lol, that's sorta my thinking. Cute imagery too, Lara stamping her feet. I also pictured her using puppy eyes on her parents when ever she wanted something.

I think there's a lot of opportunity in this origin movie to really show Lara's humanity, by showing us how normal and ordinary she once was, and what it took to forge her into the driven and ambitious woman she is today.

In this movie, I would actually love to see a naive and innocent portrayal, where even as a young adult (I'm guessing she'll be anywhere from 17-21 in this movie) she is still very much a "child", too used to the comforts that surround her, and taking for granted that she'll always be provided for.

In the immediate aftermath of the plane crash, from her life's limited experience, you'd expect she would simply "assume" she'll be rescued, because she just exects her social infrastructure to support her as it always has. But as time passes and and she can no longer carry the denial of her situation, but also be unable to come to terms with it. I picture a lot of screaming into the sky; about "it's not fair, this shouldn't happen to me, I just want to go home!!!", as if simply crying her demands will make all the badness go away. Lots of tearful scenes to accompany her frustrations where nothing in her priveleged life prepared her to cope.

Then finally, the dramatic transformation, where confonted with a more immediate life and death crisis (like maybe the first time being attacked by an animal and survual instincts just kick in), acts as a catalyst to bring to the surface an inner strength she never knew she had. I'm talking a really striking moment where she just snaps, and its all feral and savage, when she is forced to confront her own weaknesses and have to get past them, bitterly accepting the injustices of her old life being torn from her and that she'll never have that back.

Getting to see her lost innocence and the easy life she came from will really make her accomplishments that much more rewarding, and granting entitlement to her iconic status as having been truly earned.

-

On a side note, it seems to be an accepted given that the next movie will be titled "Tomb Raider: Origins". But if it were me on the studio board, I would call it "Tomb Raider: Rebirth". Not only is it a rebirth of the movie series, but the story itself exploring the rebirth of Lara herself, the character transformation from innocent heiress, to independant adventurer. Just my thoughts :)

tombraidergal
18th Oct 2009, 18:01
What I want to know is when did she learn gymnastics and climbing?

AdobeArtist
18th Oct 2009, 18:28
During her initial survival experience, she probably didn't employ any gymnastics tricks. She just wouldn't have those skills. But climbing, well anybody's childhood experience would tell us that can be intuitively learned. Who hasn't climbed a tree before, without any instruction needed.

It would have been after she got herself home, and taking responsibility for herself that she needs to look after her own needs, that she hired a trainer to teach her gymnastics, as well as other experts for all the other skills (martial arts, marksmanship, tracking, etc...) building on what she could have been able to develop when she was on her own, now tempered with proper instruction. Having matured from what she endured, she would make sure never to allow herself to be in a situation where she was unprepared again.

Ants_27_
18th Oct 2009, 18:35
In the immediate aftermath of the plane crash, from her life's limited experience, you'd expect she would simply "assume" she'll be rescued, because she just exects her social infrastructure to support her as it always has.

I know I will get flamed for this but I don't care as to me these things are important (to me):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0XmDxxBDJ0 I want lara to feel the cold if she is trecking through snow covered mountains, like our friend Mr Drake. I hope they get rid of Lara wearing shorts during a level set in the snow *cough* Anniversary.

Another example, MGS, the game(s) show it's characters feel pain and you know that you can relate o them because they are not made out to be some form of God that can't feel pain.

P.S. This wasn't about what game is better it was about the pretty obvious mistakes that ground things in reality (like hyperthermia, and general pain), and things that allow you to connect with the character more than I currently can.

AdobeArtist
23rd Oct 2009, 15:00
I know I will get flamed for this but I don't care as to me these things are important (to me):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0XmDxxBDJ0 I want lara to feel the cold if she is trecking through snow covered mountains, like our friend Mr Drake. I hope they get rid of Lara wearing shorts during a level set in the snow *cough* Anniversary.

Another example, MGS, the game(s) show it's characters feel pain and you know that you can relate o them because they are not made out to be some form of God that can't feel pain.

P.S. This wasn't about what game is better it was about the pretty obvious mistakes that ground things in reality (like hyperthermia, and general pain), and things that allow you to connect with the character more than I currently can.

I very much agree with this. But before I go on, let me clarify something too.

A lot of people have talked about TR learning from Uncharted, and have basically tried to reformat Lara's series into a TPS or even a clone of Uncharted. This should never happen! The appeal of Tomb Raider has always been as a game of mythic exploration, and must not lose that identity.

But humanizing Lara, so that she can be injured, has vulnerabilities (both physical and emotional), and can feel pain. That is absolutely RIGHT. Just look at how Sam Raimi treated Spiderman in his movie adaptations. Before you usually saw the costumed hero always looking clean with just the barest of dust to blow off after a fight. But poor Spiderman, in his battle with Green Goblin he got the **** kicked out of him!!! His costume was torn, you bruised and he BLED. And let me tell you, something like that, seeing that he could get hurt and potentially killed, really garnered empathy from the viewing audience. Raimi knew how to portray a character that the audience would connect and relate to.

That is the sorta treatment Lara needs. She can still be seen as sexy, but put in the human element, and no one will ever claim she is nothing more than an "object".

As for the gamplay elements, yeah TR could use some improvement (namely in the areas of camera) but still, it doesn't serve the series to simply imitate another game. That would just be an admition of defeat, when really this game should be remembered as the one that pioneered th 3D acrobatic platforming and exploration genre. It must always set itself apart, not get lost in the shadow of another.

Ants_27_
23rd Oct 2009, 16:43
I very much agree with this. But before I go on, let me clarify something too.

A lot of people have talked about TR learning from Uncharted, and have basically tried to reformat Lara's series into a TPS or even a clone of Uncharted. This should never happen! The appeal of Tomb Raider has always been as a game of mythic exploration, and must not lose that identity.

Don't get me wrong I didn't mean that TR should become like Uncharted (gameplay-wise) I just used that video to portray what I like in character development, that they feel pain. One thing I will add is the characters are relatable in uncharted (for me that is why I prefer them -in away- over Lara, sorry) it's the way they interact with each other, the humour they share; they act like my friends and family do and allows me to relate more to the characters.

This is what makes a game stand above the rest in my eyes, again another reason I love MGS (Also because of there epicness!):cool: